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"■■-"Television Digest 

© 1963 Television Digest, Inc. 

The authoritative service for executives in all branches of the television arts & industries 

NAB LIBRARY 



Index to Television Digest, 1961 

Volume 17, Issues No. 1 through 37 and 
New Series (NS) Volume 1, Issues No. 1 -A through 15 

References are grouped into three major categories: General (pages 1-6), Manufacturers and Merchan- 

disers (pages 7 & 8), Supplements (page 1). Index attempts to cover only items considered to be of more than 
passing interest. Reference numbers following each item designate issue and page of Newsletter in which 
item appeared. 



General 



ADVERTISING 

advertisers 

auto industry, 4:2, 7:11, 8:6, 9:10, 13:8, 
17:10 

beer, 2:8, 4:3, 7:11, 14:13, 21:12 
cigarets, 6:5, 9:5; 21:11, 23:11 
defense contractors, 14:13 
Oil cos., 5:6, 6:5, 10:3, 17:12, 18:10, 
22:10 

toy industry, 2:8, 10:14, 13:9, 20:15 
TvB: category studies, 1:13, 9:1*0, 12:6 
13:12, 16:7, 18:10, 19:7, 22:10, 23:11, 
24:6, 25:10; top 100, 25:10 
A AAA, 14:13, 17:9 

Advertising Council, 12:9, 14:15, 24:14 
AFA, 4:3, 6:4, 19:11, 22:9, 23:10 
agencies 

billings, 7:11 
Gardner, 20:15 
JWT, 4:2, 13:11 
M-E, 4:3 

Minow, reactions to, 20:6 
Y & R, 23:10, 24:6, 25:9 
ANA, 11:13 
billboard, 25:7 
budget trends, 11:3 
commercials 

American TV Festival, 6:5, 8:13, 12:9, 
19:11 

"best", 1:13 

Broadcast Advertisers Reports Inc., 22:9, 
23:10 

Cascade Pictures of Cal., 23:15 
cost control, 24:6 
criticism, 13:9, 21:11 
"good" defined, 13:9 
hard-liquor, 3:16 
product protection, 13:8 
30-min. , 19:11 
Y&R, 23:10, 25:9 
co-op adv. , 10:14 
CPM, ABC's lowest, 14:14 
credibility poll, 17:9 
criticism, 2:7, 6:4 
daytime sales, 11:9 
forecast, 1:4&5 
legislation, 6:4 

local TV sales successes, 8:11, 10:14, 15:14 
17:7, 23:11 



magazine concept, 3:6, 5:12, 7;3&10, 21:10, 
23:7 

market brand preference studies, 2:7 

media buyers, 24:7 

media costs, 5:7; profits, 17:10 

National Advertising Week, 6:4 

NBC's booklet, 'TV & Modern Mktg. ', 14:3 

network sales outlook, 9:5 

'Printers' Ink' figures, 5:7, 14:13, 23:6 

program control, 21:12 

Reps 

agency survey, 19:11 

Avery-Knodel groceries & drugs survey, 13:8 
Branham best. div. , 20:15 
business outlook survey, 8:2, 9:9 
Crosley Bcstg. Corp. , 16:9 
rate-card revisions, 1:13, 18:11 
Station Reps Assn. , 9:13, 15:14 
Storer TV Sales Inc., 6:12 
spot rate revision, 10:13 

spot TV, 6:5, 8:2&12, 9:9, 10:13, 14:2, 18:10, 
22:10, 24:6 

spot TV payment headaches, NS-5:3 



station break, 42-sec., 16:7, 17;8&9, 18:1, 19:10 
21:7&11, 24:1, 26:11 
timebuyers, 7:11, 8:7, 24:7 
"Top 100" advertisers, I960, 30:12 
"Top 100" TV spenders, 30:2 

TvB: membership, 12:11; network gross time / 
billings, 3:8, 6:10, 10:6, 15:8, 18:9, 19:6, 
22:13, 26:6; sales clinics, 15:13, 26:11; 

'TV Basics 4', 18:10 

volume: I960, 8:2; 1961 prediction, 2:9; 1961 
TV ad forecast, 31:3 

ALLOCATIONS 



Canadian-U. S. agreement, 14:11 
channel shifts, 7;7&8, 8:15, 26:14 
deintermixture 

Bakersfield, 11:6, 13:6 
Fresno, 7:8, 8?8, 9:9, 11:11, 12:11, 
legislation, 13:15 
petitions, 19:16 
digital TV technique, 5:6 
FCC policy, 2:1, 5:1, 18:4 
forecast, 1:5 



16:4 



Supplements and Special Reports Published During 1961 

References are to issue of TELEVISION DIGEST with articles pertaining to the supplements. 



Directories 

Annual AM-FM Directory of Jan. 1; with weekly 
Addenda reporting current FCC decisions, ap- 
plications, etc. Listings of all AM-FM sta- 
tions by states and frequencies, all applications 
by states and frequencies, call letter lists, etc. 
(includes other North American stations). 

Semi-Annual TV Factbook (Spring-Summer, No. 
32) with weekly Addenda reporting current 
FCC grants, applications, new stations on air, 
etc. 

Special Supplements 



FCC Rules on Stereophonic FM Broadcasting . Full 
text (Vol. 17:17). 

Addresses by FCC Chmn. Newton N. Minow and 
NAB Pres. LeRoy Collins to the 39th Annual 
NAB Convention. Full text. (Vol. 17:20). 

Financial Data on Electronics St Broadcasting 
Companies. "Statistical summaries of reports 
of leading publicly-owned companies. Prepared 
by Greenebaum & Associates, financial con- 
sultants in electronics. (Vol. 17:21). 

Television Households by States & Counties. ARB 
survey-based estimates as of January 1, 1961. 
(Vol. 17:26). 



Index to Television Digest, I960; Volume 16. 

Index to I960 Television Digest Newsletters & 
Special Reports. (Vol. 17:4). 

FCC Public Notice on Program Forms. Full text 
of FCC's Public Notice 61 -223 393. (Vol. 17:9). 



FCC*s Revised Proposed Rules on Program Forms 
&i Logging Requirements. (Vol. 17:28). 

Special Reports 

Telefilm Candidates for Next Season's Programs. 
(Vol. 17:3 pp 3&9). 



The Television Network and American Society . An 
address by Robert W. Sarnoff. (Vol. 17:15). 



Tentative Network Program Lineups for Fall . 
Chart. (Vol. 17:14 pp 6& 7). 



international agreement, 7:8 
multi-city identifications, 6:12, 18:6, 21:9, 
26:14 

Rochester 3rd vhf, 17:6, 19:14 
site changes, 14:12, 15:13 
spectrum space, 2:3, 4:10, 10:1 
Syracuse 3rd vhf, 17:6 

uhf: Ch. 37 for radio astronomy; scatter, 16:4; 
shift to all-uhf, 1:9 

AM (Standard) BROADCASTING 

ABC Radio, 4:11, 10:7, 14:24 
amateur radio week, 6:13, 13:16 
clear channel FCC decision, 19:16, 25:9 
criticism, 9:12 

daytime hours legislation, 4:11, 5:9, 9:11, 12:4 
Edison radio amateur award, 6:7, 9:5 
EIA figures: retail sales, 2:16, 7:16, 12:16, 
20:21 

forecast, 1:4&6 
Kahn stereo system, 24:5 
KBLT Big Lake, Tex., 19:16 
Mexican-U.S. agreement, 25:11 
National Radio Month, 15:12, 17:16 
Radio Free Europe, 5:14, 20:10 
Samoan licenses, 19:17 
shipboard radio equip., 9:11* 13:16 
station totals, 4:2 
WBZA Springfield, Mass. , 6:12 
Station Sales 

Buffalo, N. Y., WBNY, 31:14 
Chicago. 111., WGES, 32:17 
Cincinnati, O. , WSAI, 5:13, 11:11 
Concordia, Kan., KFRM, 6:12 
Dayton, O. , WGNE & WIFE, 14:15 
Denver, Colo., KHOW, 6:12 
Des Moines, la., KIOA, 19:16 
Elmira, N.Y., WENY, 28: 5 
Flint, Mich., WTAC, 11:11 
Glendale, Cal., KIEV, 9:10 
Houston, Tex., KTHT, 8:15; KXYZ, 23:5 
Los Angeles, Cal., KRKD, 1:9, 13:6 
New York, WINS (cancelled), NS-5:15 
Palm Springs, Cal., KCMJ, 17:7 
Paterson, N.J., WPAT, 21:16 
Tulsa, Okla. , KTUL, 30:7 
Canada 

Toronto, Ont. , CKEY, 8:8, 10:13 

AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY (ABC) 
"ABC Final Report", 15:6 
ABC International TV Inc., 15:8, 17:12 
ABC News, 9:5, 12:6 
AB-PT 

financial reports, 10:24, 13:24, 18:18, 21:23, 
32:24, NS- 8; 12 
foreign interests, 10:7 
Hazel Bishop Co. suit, 26:11 
Selmur Productions, 1:12, 6:9 
sit-in demonstration, 24:12 
stock increase, 16:20 
Visual Electronics Corp. 16:8 
affiliates, 9:3, 10:13, 14:14, 19:1, 20:10, 26:6 
"American Business Briefing", 22:5 
Bing Crosby special, 12:6, 20:16 
foreign network sales, 4:11, 13:17 
Hagerty, James C., 3:8, 8:5, 18:9, 26:5 
"The Islanders", 3:15 
Miami meeting, 2:13, 3:7 
National TV Sales, 26:6 
newsfilm by wire, 20:5 
"Peter Gunn", 11:5 
reruns, 25:12 

"The Roosevelt Years", 12:7 
schedule, fall, 11:3, 14:6, 15:7 
signal synchronizer, 15:13 
"Silents Please", 6:7 
standards converter, 21:12 
station break, 40-sec., 16;7, 17:8&9, 18:1, 
19:10, 21:7&11, 24:1 
Treyz, Oliver Pres. , 16:11 
"The Untouchables", 3:14, 4:7, 5:9, 6:6, 8:3, 
9:12, 11:5, 12:7, 13:9, 14:6, 15:5&9, 16:6, 
25:14 

urges drop-in speed, 34:6 

"The Valiant Years," 8:4, 18:13, 24:12 

West Coast expansion, 25:16 

ANTITRUST (See also Patents) 

electrical equip, price-fixing, 7:8&18, 10:19, 
12:18, 13:6, 14:1, 15:18, 21:21, 25:21 
House hearings, 23:4 
RCA-NBC, 14:2 

resistor price-fixing conspiracy, 4:18, 24:18 
tube pricing, 24:18 



APPLICATIONS fe CPs FOR NEW TV STATIONS 
Initial Decisions 
Columbia, S. C. , Ch. 25, 16:5 
Greensboro, N.C., Ch. 8, 11:7 
Lafayette, La., Ch. 3, 24:5 
Medford, Ore., Ch. 10, 14:12 
New Bedford, Mass., Ch. 6, 17:6 
Panama City, Fla., Ch. 13, 7:7 
Portland, Ore., Ch. 2, 10:12 
Reno, Nev. , Ch. 4, 18:6 
Final Decisions 

Christiansted, St. Croix, V.I. , Ch. 8, 6:12 
Medford, Ore., Ch. 10, 22:12 
Court Decisions 
Beaumont, Tex., Ch. 12, 8:15 

ASSOCIATIONS (not listed under other categories) 
Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, 

22:8 

Academy of TV Arts & Sciences, 5:10&11, 13:13, 
14:8, 19:8, 20:10 

American Woman in Radio & TV, 17:7, 19:14 
Broadcast Pioneers, 4:12, 20:10 
Bcstrs. Promotion Assn. , 4:6, 7:6 
Federal Bar Assn., 6:4 
Fla. Assn, of Bcstrs., 25:11 
Inter-American Assn, of Bcstrs., 20:10 
Maximum Service Telecasters, 15:13, 19:16, 
20:11 

National Automobile Dealers Assn., 6:4 
National Religious Bcstrs. Inc., 5:14 
Radio-TV Correspondents Assn., 9:13 
Radio & TV Exec. Society, 14:15, 22:14 
Radio-TV News Directors Assn., 11:13 
Society of TV Pioneers, 20:11 

BOOSTERS fe TRANSLATORS 
application forms, 17:6 
rebroadcast permission, 2:9 
uhf boosters: on channel, 4:5, 21:5 
uhf translator burned, 14:12 

vhf boosters: applications, 4:4, 13:17; hearings, 
7:24, 10:8; protests, 1:10 
vhf translators: applications, 4:5; on air, 9:10, 
station ownership, 21:9 
Western Translator Conf. , 8:10 

CLOSED-CIRCUIT "MEETING" TV 
automotive industry, 10:8 

Dalto Electronics' portable TV projector, 4:12 
forecast, 1:7 

Giantview General projector systems, 13:17 
hotel network, 13:16 
medical TV, 17:24 
TNT, 14:12, 24:7, 25:22 

COLOR 

black & white system, 16:9 

forecast, 1:16 

GE, 14:18, 16:15, 20:4 

Internat. Home Furnishings Market, 2:15, 3:20 
Japan, 9:17 

Lawrence tube, 14:18, 24:15 
NBC, 10:5, 19:6, 25:18 
Philco, 24:15 

RCA, 2:15, 4:19, 14:18, 20:4 
roundup, 16:15 
Sears Roebuck, 20:19 
single gun tubes, 14:18 
TNT closed-circuit, 14:12 
Zenith, 9:2&14 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM (See also 
CBS Inc, under Mfrs. ) 

"Adventure Theater", 22:5 

affiliates, 7:10, 18:14, 19:1, 20:10, 21:10 

"Big City--1980", 5:6 

Boone, Richard, 8:12 

"Candid Camera", 9:12 

"The College of the Air", 19:8 

CBS News, 6:10, 10:6, 12:6, 17:13 

CBS Spot Sales renamed, 27:12 

"Eyewitness to History", 2:10 

Foundation: fellowships, 17:12; grants, 24:12 

Garland, Judy, 3:7 

"Gunsmoke", 4:7 

"Harvest of Shame", 4:7, 5:6, 6:13, 7:14, 8:14, 
13:4, 14:17 
IATSE walkout, 15:8 
"Malibu Run", 14:8 
medical-care documentary, 9:11 
"Million Dollar Incident", 17:13 
Moore, Garry, 19:11 
newsfilm by wire, 20:5 

2 



COMMUNITY ANTENNA SYSTEMS 
Canadian CATV, NS-6:3 
closed-circuit, 26:9 

FCC legislation, 3:4, 8:10, 9:4, 15:4, 16:10, 
19:17 

o&o's, 11:11, 24:12 

participations, 3:6, 5:12, 7:3, 21:10, 23:7 
"Perry Mason", 6:10, 21:14, 23:14 
"Playhouse 90", 21:4 
plugola, 12:6 

"The Power and the Glory", 20:16 
Production Sales unit, 4:11 
programming 

pre-emptions, 7:10 

public-affairs, 14;6, 24:9 

schedule, 8:14, 11:2, 14:6, 15:7, 21:10, 

23:7 

ratings, 23:6 

review, year-end, 3:5 

"Spy Next Door", 6:6, 10:8 

standards converter, 21:12 

Stanton, Frank Dr., 22:3, 24:12 

station break, 24:1 

studio consolidation, 2:13 

Sullivan, Ed, 4:7, 8:3, 11:5, 12:7, 24:14 

Television City, 20:14, 21:13 

Thomas, Danny, 13:10 

"The Twentieth Century", 2:10, 11:13 

"Washington Conversation", 8:9 

"Way Out", 15:6 

"Witness", 3:15 

forecast, 1:6 

H & B American, 24:7, 25:22, 31:14; Canadian 
CATVs, 35:8 

Investors like CATV, NS-2:3 
Jerrold Electronics Corp. 2:9, 4:5, 24:7 
microwave grants, 2:9, 4:5, 13:17, 15:4, 22:11 
Montreal, 24:7 

NCTA, 12:12, 24:7, 25:6, 26:2&9 
Rediffusion-Superior TV Ltd., 4:5 
RTES Workshop, 4:4 

sales, 4:5, 7:24, 10:8, 13:17, 16:10, 17:7&24, 
24:7, 25:22 

Salt Lake stations not infringed, 27:2 
Sammons buys Oil City, 31:14 
Systems Management Inc., 4:5 
TelePrompTer buys 2 systems, 35:8, NS-8:4 
uhf field, entry into, 19:9 

CONGRESS 

anti- sabotage bill, NS-4:6 
forecast, 1:3 

House Commerce Comm., 2:4, 4:11, 7:14, 8:9, 
9:11, 14:16 

House Commerce Legislative Oversight Sub- 
committee, 1:10, 2:2 

House Communications & Power Subcomm. , 

11:12 

House TV & radio coverage, 2:3, 8:9, 9:11 
legislation 

bcstg. interests of congressmen, 11:12 
Budget, Joint Committee on, 5:9 
communications probe, 5:8 
Congressmen's finances, 17:16 
crime, 6:13 
defamation, 8:9 
gambling, 21:7 

network regulation, 2:2, 8:9, 20:12 
sabotage, 23:3, 26:14 
subversive activities, 13:16 
regulatory agencies 

Administrative Conf. of the U. S. , 3:5, 16:5, 
19:15, 20:13, 22:12, 26:13 
ethics, 5:4, 6:13, 9:11, 18:2, 19:15, 20:12, 
23:4, 24:13 

FCC reorganization plan, 23:2, 24: 3, 26:4, 
34:3 

Landis Report, 1:1, 2:2, 3:3&18, 5:48*7, 

6:4, 7:7, 8:14, 10:14, 13:6, 14:16, 15:1, 
16:1, 17:6 

legislation, 2:3, 5:8, 7:14, 13:15; assails 
industry, 33:4 

records, public access, 16:6 
Regulatory Agencies Subcommittee, 10:9 
reorganization, Kennedy plan, 16:1, 17:16, 
18:2, 19:3, 20:12, 21:1, 22:1, 23:2, 25:3 
White House control, 12:4, 13:15, 14:16 
satellite plan, NS- 5:2 

Senate Commerce Committee, 2:2, 3:16, 7;7, 
8:9, 14:17, 19:17 

Senate Commerce Freedom of Communications 
Subcommittee, 2:4, 4:11, 5:8, 6:2&13, 10:11, 
11:12, 12:4, 13:15, 14:4 
Senate Judiciary Administrative Practice & 
Procedure Subcomm., 14rl6 



Senate Judiciary Antitrust & Monopoly Sub- 
comm. , 14:16, 1 6: 1 3 

Senate Juvenile Delinquency Subcomm. , 23:3, 
24:2, 25:7, 26:3 
Senate salutes Sarnoff, 36:7 
Sports Bill, 37:3 

station (radio) income data sought, NS- 14:1 

EDUCATIONAL TV 

Albany, N. Y. ETV, 13:14 

Assn, of Professional Bcstg. Ed., 17:8, 20:10 

AT & T lowers rates for ETV, NS-9:3 
Cal. recommendations, 10:10 
courses, 15:11, 20:18 
Defense Education Act of 1958, 18;7 
ETV's needs, NS-15:1 
Fla. Ed. Assn. Convention, 15:11 
Ford Foundation survey, 17:24 
forecast, 1:6 

grants: Ford, 2:12, 3:15, 11:7, 17:24, govt., 
10:10 

Inst, for Ed. by Radio-TV, 15:11, 18:10 
Joint Council on Ed. Bcstg. , 7:24 
Jefferson Standard Bcstg. scholarship, 22:14 
Kennedy news-conf. films, 2:12 
Learning Resources Institute, 19:8 
legislation, 2:3, 3:15, 4:10, 6:14, 9:10, 10:9. 
11:7, 12:3, 13:2, 14:17, 15:5, 19:17, 20:8, 
21:8, 22:11, 25:22 
Maine, WPTT Augusta CP, 10:10 
Miami-Bahamas link, 36:11 
Milwaukee uhf-vhf operation, 7:24 
MPATI, 6:14, 13:14, 17:24, 19:9. 21r8, 37:9 
National Assn, of Ed. Bcstrs. , 17:24 
NET, 20:18, 22:10 

N.Y. & L. A. vhfs, 14:2, 18:6, 19:15, 22:12, 
23:7 

N.Y. uhf CPs, 11:7 
Pa. statewide network, 2:12 
patronage trends, 10:10, 13:14 
teacher-training course, 10:10 
Texas closed-circuit system, 7:24 
Washington ETV, 11:7 
Wilmington Ch. 12, 15:11 



ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIES ASSN. (EIA) 
ad practices code, NS-1:14 
Board meeting, 12:13&tl5, 13:21 
convention, 37th annual, 21:20, *22:15&16 
electronic-equip. , industrial sales statistics, 
5:18 

Japanese embargo petition, 23:17 
Medal of Honor, 1961, 12:15, 22:19 
microwave service, 15:13 
'Plus Values', 2:17 
Renegotiation Act of 1951, 7:20 
Sandwick joins staff, NS-1:14 
Spring conf. , 7:21, 12:13&tl5 
TV-radio code, NS-1:1A 



ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY 

analysis of excise taxes, NS- 1:8 
Census Bureau's TV homes, NS-1:15 
Commerce Dept, predictions, 5:16 
components: minimum wage,* 21:19; prod., 
7:21 

consumer electronic 1961 dollar volume, NS- 
1:12 

employment picture, 7:19 

'Financial World' profiles, 2:19 

Fortune's 500 largest firms, 1961, 30:23 

Fortune's top foreign electronics firms, 32:22 

industrial electronics plant needs, 9:18 

Japanese threat, 4:17 

micro-circuit program, 29:16 

sales volume prediction, 12:16 

"small business" definition, 5:18 

Top defense firms, I960, 28:17 

TV's annual electricity bill, NS- 1:4 

TV-radio sales, 1961, NS-1:15 

TV-set ownership in 19 markets, 28:15 



ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS 
consumer, new, 10:18 
Eidophor theatre-TV, NS- 1:10 
highway, 26:18 

hospital TV showcase, NS- 1:9 
industrial electronic-equip. sales, 5:18 
molecular electronics, 26:15 

picture-on-wall breakthrough seen in '62, 1: 7 
satellite TV for homes, NS- 1:9 



EQUIPMENT, TELECASTING 
Cameras 

GE's low-light orthicon tube, 22:6 
NAB convention, 20:4 
Towers 

FAA proposals, 25:8; rules relaxed, 30:3 
legislation, unused, 5:4, 6:13, 7:14, 19:17, 

21:7 

lighting demonstration by WMTV Madison, 7:4 
Miscellaneous 

automatic logging apparatus, 3:5 
automation systems, 20:4 

bi-directional TV distribution system, 1:11 
sound film system, 10:15 

Triangle buys into ITA Electronics, 22:6, 24:5 
trip-cue cartridge tape recorder, 1:9 
TV monitors, 10:15 
TV projection systems, 13:17 

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (FCC) 
about-faces on Moline TV grant, 27:6 
all-channel sets, 5:1, 6:1, 12:13, 13:6, 16:4, 

24:5, 26:14 

allocations - TV meeting, 30:1; Lee's views, 

30:6; proposals, 31:2 
AM-FM financial data, I960, NS- 1:9 
AM overcrowding, NS- 1:10 
Bartley, Comr., 12:4 
Boston Ch. 5 case, 5:3, 20:13, 22:12 
budget, 4:10, 10:9, 13:6, 23:4, 24:13 
clear channel decision, NS-1:1A 
deintermixture analysis, 30:4 
fee schedule for licenses, 27:1 
fines for violations, 19:17, 24:13, 26:14 
Ford, Comr., 7:7, 16:3, 17;6, 18:6 
forecast, 1:3 

forfeiture actions-KDWB, St. Paul, 31:7; radio 
KOMA, NS- 1:11 
Indianapolis Ch. 13 case, 25:8 
Jacksonville Ch. 12 case, 16:5 
joins FTC on deceptive practices, NS- 1:8 
Kingstree, S. C. obscenity case, 32:8 
Lee, Comr., 1:9, 11:7, 15:5 
legislative program, 1:7 

license renewal, 1:8, 2:6, 4:10, 5:4 8:14&15, 

12:1, 13:6, 14 : 1&12, 16:4, 18:6, 19:15, 20:11, 
22:12, 23:5, 24:4&5 
licensees fee system, 5:14, 21:9 
Miami Ch. 7 case, 11:7, 12:1 
Miami Ch. 10 case, 1:8, 13:5, 21:16 
Miami Ch. 10 decision upheld, 28:3; WLBW-TV 
takes over from WPST-TV, NS- 1:6 
Miami Ch. 6 case, 1:5 

Miami Ch. 7 awarded to Sunbeam TV, 31:3 
Minow, Newton N. Chmn. , 3:1, 4:10, 6:1, 7:2, 
8:2, 9:10, 10:2, 11:1&7, 17:16, 20:1, 7fc8, 

21:2, 4&5, 22:2, 4, 1 1 & 12, 23 : 8&9, 24:4, 25:1& 

8, 26:3&14; hits censorship "false alarms, " 
NS- 1:15; child-TV plan, 1:2; views on program 
censorship, NS-1:4 
NAB convention panel, 20:9 
network controls proposed, 33:2 
network hearing, 13:4, 21:9, 22:12, 23:5, 25:9, 
26:5, 27:8, NS-1:10 
"network" definition sought, 24:12 
option time debate, NS- 1:13 
ordered to hear Philco vs. WRCV-TV, 27:9 
Orlando Ch. 9 case, 9:10 
payola, 8:14, 18:3, 22:12, 24:5, 26:14 
plugola, 20:13, 25:9 

procedures, 2:6, 7:14, 8:9, 11:7, 12:4, 13:16, 
18:2&7, 19:17, 25:8, 26:14 
"public interest" definitions, 2:5 
receiver radiation, 23:17, 24:f» 
reorganization: Kennedy plan, 18:2, 19:3, 20:12, 
21:1, 22:1, 25:3; FCC's plan, 23:2, 24:3, 

26:4 

reverses examiner on CATV microwave, NS- 1:14 
revokes license of radio WIOS, NS- 1:1 5 
review, I960, 1:8 
rules & regulations 

automatic logging, 3:5 

Form 324, 6:3 

multiple ownership, 23:3 

option time, 17:3, 19:2, 21:9 

program-form, 3:4, 8:1, 9:2, 10:11, 13:6, 

15:5, 17:3, 18:6, 19:16, 20:13, 23:5 
spot-rep decision, 10:2 

station applications, 2:6, 3:6, 6:13, 20:13 
station sales, 3:6, 4:1, 5:4 
tower evaluation, 2:6, 3:16, 5:4 
violations, 6:13, 13:1 
St. Louis Ch. 2 case, 8:15 
satellite proposal, NS-1:9 

Senate Appropriations Subcomm. hearing, 25:2 



short-term renewals-KDB & WKKO, NS-l:lA; 

WHOL, NS- 1:4 
Spartanburg, S. C. case, 1:9 
spectrum commission opposed, 32:4 
stations warned on promises, 29:1 
Suburban Bcstrs.'s FM application rejected, 27:1 
Tampa-St. Petersburg Ch. 10 case, 6:13 
tools for "program improvement", 28:1 
TV film hearings, 5:4, 7:8, 11:3, 12:5, 13:4 
TV station I960 income, 36:3 
uhf project under way in N.Y., NS-1:12 
vanishing Vs, Lee's plan, NS- 1:3 
withdrawal rule, NS- 1:5 

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION (FTC) 
budget, 4:10 

Dixon, Paul Rand Chmn., 7:3, 11:12, 12:2, 13:8, 
15:14, 16:13,17:4, 19:4&10, 20:15, 23:10 
Elman, Philip, 16:13, 17:9; views on FTC's 
role, NS-4:2 

false advertising, 2:8, 3:178*18, 5:7, 10:148*15, 
12:8, 13:9, 15:18*5, 17:9, 18:11, 19:10, 20:15* 
21:1 18*12, 22:9, 23:10, 25:10, 26:11 
forecast, 1:3 
Kern, W.C.. 3:18 

Kintner, Earl W. , 2:8, 3:17, 5:7, 7:3 

MacIntyre, A. E. , 19:10 

new enforcement rules, 28:2 

payola, 13:14, 14:15, 15:12, 16:8, 17:7, 26:10 

FILM 

Bing Crosby Productions, 2:11 
blacklisting suit, 1:13, 8:13, 12:9 
blockbooking, 5:5, 7:15, 17:12 
business conditions, 12:9 
Cal. National Productions, 22:8, 23:6 
Carousel Films, 2:11 
cartoons, animated, 1:12 
CBS Films, 20:17, 24:10 
Communists, employment of, 4:8 
costs, 7:13 

Desilu, 7:12, 8:13, 10:3, 1 1:9& 1 1. 13:10, 18:12, 
19:13, 21:14, 24:10 
exports, 5:10, 22:2, 24:10, 25:148*15 
FCC hearings, 5:4, 7:8, 11:3, 12:5, 13:4, 21:9 
Film Producers Assn, of N.Y.,’ 1:12 
forecast, 1:6; 1962 foreign sales, 30:10 
Four Star TV, 6:9, 10:4, 19:12, 21:14; buys 
Marterto, 36:9 
import legislation, 22:11 
Intercontinental TV Inc. , 4:8 
ITC, 11:8 

Japanese import policy, 16:2 

MGM-TV, b:8, 13:10, 17:14, 19:12, 20:17, 25:15 
Minow, executives reaction to, 20:6, 21:4 
museum, movie 8* TV, 1:12, 11:8, 12:10, 16:12 
network sales boxscore, 13:10 
NTA, 7:12, 8:13, 10:3, 11:8, 14:9, 15:9, 18:12, 
21:13, 24: 108*1 1 

NT8*T, 14:9, 16:12, 17:15, 24:8 
Official Films, 13:13, 20:17 
Paramount, 14:8, 15:9 

pilots: Also see N.Y. 8* Hollywood Roundups: 
1:11, 3:3, 6:8, 9:6, 13:10, 16:12 
production: network, 26:12; producers, 9:7; 

small cos., 9:6, 25:13; volume, 20:17 
Revue Studios, 9:6, 18:12, 25:13 
RKO General suit, 11:8, 12:10 
Screen Gems, 16:12, 23:14 
selling a series, 18:11 
series sales, 8:12, 18:12, 19:13 
Seven Arts Productions, 14:10 
syndication, 1:6, 9:7, 17:15, 19:38*12, 21:13, 
22:78*8, 23:14, 25:13 

syndicators in Mexico, 32:14, NS-11:12, NS- 
13:12 

Transfilm-Caravel, 1:12, 7:13 
20th Century-Fox, 2:19, 6:8, 7:12, 11:8, 19:13, 
24:11, 25:14, 26:12 
veteran personalities, 22:7 

Warner Bros., 1:13, 3:8, 6:7, 9:8, 14:9, 17:14, 
24:10 

Ziv-UA, 15:10 
Backlogs to TV 
buying analysis, 22:6 
forecast, 1:6 

NAB screening, 20:5, 24:11 

post- '48 sales, 2:11, 14:10, 15:98*11. 18:12, 

20:17 

Film Producers and Distributors Financial 
Reports 

ABC Films, 25:14 
Allied Artists, 8:20, 22:22 
Capital Film Labs, 25:24 



3 



Columbia Pictures, 4:20, 14:23, 24:20 
CBS Films. 2:11, 24:10 
Desilu, 6:19, 9:20, 22:22, 26:19 
Filmways, 9:19 

Four Star TV, 9:20, 20:24, 21:24, NS-11:12 

Guild Films, 8:19, 10:23, 13:11 

MGM, 3:24, 4:19, 9:20, 12:20, 16:20, NS-10:12 

Metromedia, 36:16 

Movielab Film Labs, 16:20, 25:24 

MPO Videotronics, 7:23, 10:21 

NTA, 8:20, 12:18, 15:20 

Official Films, 9:20 

Paramount, 7:22, 12:18, 14:21, 18:18, 19:24, 
24:20, NS- 12:1 1 

Republic, 7:23, 9:16. 15:20, 24:20 
Screen Gems. 2:20, 7:24, 8:19, 14:23, 15:20, 
23:20 

Seven Arts, 24:11 

Stanley Warner, 3:24, 15:20 

Sterling TV, 7:23, 25:20 

Television Industries, 21:24, 23:14 

Trans-Lux, 16:20, 21:24, 37:16 

Twentieth Century-Fox, 19:24, 21:13, NS-12:11 

United Artists, 9:19, 17:23, 25:24 

Universal Pictures, 6:20, 13:24, 26:20 

UPA Pictures Inc., 23:14 

Walt Disney Prod. , 3:24, 7:23, 18:18&20, 21:23 
Warner Bros., 6:20, 13:23, 16:19, 23:20, 24:20 
35:20 

FINANCIAL ACTIVITY, GENERAL 
Manufacturing 

electronics profit roundup, 12:14 
small-business investment cos., other, 9:19, 
11:18, 17:22, 24:20 
Avionics Investing, 9:19 
Axe Science & Electronics, 12:19 
Electronics Capital, 3:23, 7:24, 17:22, 22:21, 
25:23 

Electronics Investment, 10:23, 23:19 
TV-Electronics Fund, 9:19, 22:21 
TV Shares Management, 23:20 
Telecasting (See Also Advertising) 
forecast, 1:4 

Capital Cities Bcstg., 8:20, 25:24 
Crowell-CoUier Pub. , 12:18 
Famous Players Canadian, 12:20, 25:24 
Goodwill Stations Inc. , 12:20, 19:14 
Gross Telecasting, 15:20 

Meredith Publishing, 6:19, 7:23, 8:20, 19:24 
MetroMedia, 10:22, 14:24, 20:24, 26:10 
NAFICorp., 4:6, 11:20, 19:24, NS-11:12 
NT&T, 7:23, 11:20, 21:24, 26:20 
Reeves Bcstg. & Development, 14:23, 26:19 
RKO General, 14:24, 17:7 
Rollins Bcstg., 10:22, NS-11:12 
stations' I960 profits, 29:2 

Storer Bcstg. , 1:20, 3:24, 8:20, 12:20, 16:9, 
17:23 

Taft Bcstg., 5:20, 20:24, 23:19, 24:20 
Tele-Broadcasters, 20:22, 23:20 
Time, 14:23 

Times-Mirror, 14:23, 22:22 
Transcontinent TV, 24:19, 25:24 
Westinghouse loses affiliation tax case, 3 6:1 
Wometco, 2:20, 12:20, 16:19, 19:24, 21:21 

FOREIGN TRADE 

American -Radio Importers Assn., 13:22, 19:22 
exports: U.S. figures, 2:16, 5:17, 7:18, 11:17; 

violations, 10:21 
forecast, 1:17 
imports 

British, 3:23, 9:18 
Canadian, 26:19 
ELA, 12:13, 22:20 
German, 3:23, 13:20 

IBEW boycott. 4:17, 5:15, 9:17, 11:18, 12:13, 
16:18, 17:20 

International Home Furnishings Market, 3:21 
Italian, 19:22 

Japanese, 2:16&17, 3:23, 4:16, 5:17, 6:15, 
9:17, 10:20, 11:18, 12:13, 13:22, 14:19&20, 
16:16&18, 23:17, 26:17 
U.S. figures, 2:16, 5:17, 6:15, 11:17 
Japanese securities, 4:19 
legislation, 2:3, 19:17 

Philco's overseas operations, 4:14, 10:23 
pricing Senate probe, 6:18 

FOREIGN TV 

CBS roundup, 13:17 

international allocations agreement, 7:8 

international TV, 10:7 

Intertel, 17:16, 23:9, 24:9, 25:15 



investment forecast, 1:7 
Latin- American network, 19:18 
standards converters, 21:12 
world TV set count, 17:5 
References to Specific Countries 
Africa, 6:14, 23:6 
Argentina, 19:18, 20:17, 24:10 
Australia, 5:5, 14:20, 20:17, 22:8, 24:8 
Brazil, 20:17, 21:14, 22:3, 24:10, 26:12 
Chile, 28:13 
Colombia, 22:13 
Costa Rica, NS- 14:6 
Cuba, 1:10, 2:10, 12:5, 17:8&13, 22:6 
Denmark, 5:5 
Ecuador, 22:24 
Formosa, 5:9 

France, 7:8, 8:5, 11:9, 12:5, 14:24 

Germany, 5:5, 8:5, 10:12, 12:5 

Holland, 5:5 

India, 22:20 

Ireland, 24:8 

Israel, 9:18 

Italy, 5:5&tl2, 8:5, 22:8 

Japan, 4:5&11, 5:9, 7:8, 9:17, 16:2, 17:21, 21:13, 
25:15 

Laos, 21:10 

Latin America, 12:6, 19:18 
Lebanon, 33:8 
Malaya, 20:14 
Mexico, 23:7 
Nicaragua, 2:18 
Peru, 22:20 
Philippines, 5:5, 22:10 
Puerto Rico, 22:6 

Russia, 5:6, 12:10, 16:11, 17:16, 25:21 
Singapore, NS- 14: 6 
Sudan, 17:24 
Sweden, 4:5, 15:4 
UAR, 37:11 
Uruguay, 22:20 
Virgin Islands, 19:14 
Yugoslavia, 8:5 
Britain 

Associated-Rediffusion, 10:4 

BBC, guide to, 22:23 

bookselling on TV, 17:10 

British Space Development Co. Ltd., 6:7 

eclipse, sun, 8:5 

E.M.I. Ltd., 7:22, 11:19 

English Electric, 22:21 

license fee, 24:8 

reading instrument, electronic, 10:21 
Thorn Electrical Ind. , 23:18 
TV ad tax, 18:11 
TV writers' school, 15:4 
Visnews, 6:8 

Canada 

Board of Broadcast Governors 
beer & ale rules, 4:3 

CBC disaffiliation sought, 22:13, 25:15, 

26:7 

CATV, 10:8, 13:17, 16:10 
fines, 13:14 

pay TV, 10:8, 13:17, 16:10 

satellite applications, 7:6, 11:11, 14:15, 

24:5 

CBC 

budget, 21:10, 24:12 
directors Quebec meeting, 5:12 
"General Motors Presents", 22:5 
microwave systems, new, 10:13 
NABET pact, 17:11 

news-service employes wage disputes, 9:5 
two stations leave, 28:13 
Charge-a-vision, 4:5 
ETV, 5:12, 24:13 
imports, 17:21 
licensee fees, 19:15 
Montreal TV & FM tower, 13:13 
National Community Antenna TV Assn., 8:10 
private TV network, 13:12, 16:8, 17:11# 31:13 
revenues, 28:4 

Telemeter's Toronto pay-TV operation, 2:9, 

4:4, 10:3, 13:16, 15:4, 22:11 
TV-radio code, 7:6 
TV-radio program content, 8:6, 12:11 
TV set census, 4:6 

TV sales to dealers, 5:18, 7:16, 8:17, 11:18,. 
17:21, 21:20, 25:19 

FREQUENCY MODULATION (FM) 
educational multiplexing, 5:12 
ELA production figures, 2:16, 7:16, 12:16, 

15:17, 20:21, 25:19 
forecast, 1:16 



NAB survey, 1 5: 12 
plane radio ban, 20:22 
radio sales, 2:15 
station totals, 4:2 

INDUSTRIAL TV 

ITT slow-scan system, 13:17 
Tel-Eye system, 21:21 
3-D system, 17:21 
traffic control, N. Y. , 17:24 
underwater TV, 21:5 

INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS (IRE) 
convention, 4:13 

JUSTICE DEPARTMENT 
forecast, 1:5 
Loevinger, Lee, 8:15 

LABOR 

automation, 6:18, 16:6 

electronic ind. employment picture, 7:19 
overtime, small-market stations, 4:11, 11:12, 
16:6,17:8, 19:17 

salaries: engineers, 7: 19; media buyers, 24:7 
station labor relations, federal regulations, 

9:9 

MARKET AND AUDIENCE RESEAR CH 

ARB: C-E-I-R merger, 22:6, 23:9; TV house- 
holds, 26:1 

Milwaukee viewers survey, 21:5 
Nielsen 

AA ratings, 14:5, 23:6 

audience competition, 14:3 

Automated Preference Testing purchase, 

14:24 

casualty rate, 5:5 
casualties' ratings, 5:5 
daytime audience interests, 8:6 
financial reports, 2:20, 14:23, 15:20 
late fringe-time audience, 8:6 
MNA ratings, 26:6 
network viewing decline, 17:7 
NMS, 26:11 
NTI reports, 1:14 
public-service programs, 11:8 
reruns analysis, 13:14 
"Television '61", 21:3 
viewing figures, 4:7, 10:2, 14:4, 19:7 
Pulse: editorials, 22:4; viewing by category, 5:5 
rating services: criticism, 6:5, 12:8, 13:3, 18:14, 
19:6, 26:4 
R orabaugh, 26: 1 1 

Schwerin Research Corp. TV survey, 10:16 

Sponsor: casualty rates, 11:5 

TvAR: pet owners viewing, 12:8 

TvQ: age group program preferences, 3:15 

MEDICAL USE OF TV 

Council on Med. TV, 2:12, 8:10, 16:7, 17:24, 20:13 
scrambled ETV, 14:12, 23:5, 24:8 
Walter Reed Med. TV Center, 1:11, 2:9, 5:9, 
6:11, 17:24 

MERCHANDISING, TV RECEIVER & APPLI- 
ANCES (See also Color) 
business failures, 23:18 

calendar TV-radio-phono showings 13:20,14:21 
consumer buying plans surveys, 8:17, 14:20 
Electronics Leasing Corp., 5:18 
European electronics, viewed by RCA's Mills, 
NS-1 :3 

FM-stereo showcase, WTFM opens, NS-1:11 
FTC complaints: false claims, 1:19,2:17, 15:19, 
22:21; tube labeling, 5:17, 7:20, 10:19 & 21, 
13:20, 14:19, 17:21, 26:18 
forecast, 1:16 

industry leaders forecast, 1:17 

Internat. Home Furnishings Market, 2:14, 3:19 

junkets, retailers, 23:18 

Hertz TV rental business, NS-1:5 

ITT enters radio business, NS-1:7 

legislation 

model year tag, 5:18 
NARDA Chicago convention, 4:16 
product misbranding, 2:3 
Mansfield's forecast on future TV market, 34:13 
Muntz TV profile, 31:21 
Philco ID program, NS-1:8 
prices: trends, 2:14, 3:20, 23:16 
Ravenswood, 26:18 
sales 

appliances, factory sales prediction, 1:19 
EIA figures, retail, 2:16, 7:16, 12:16, 15:17, 
20:21, 25:19 
forecast, 1:16 
low-end market, 26:17 



4 



) 



predictions for 1961, 4:16, 7:17 
summary, 23:16 
upswing, 21:17, 22:15, 25:15 
scrapping, TV sets, 18:15 
Sony's 8-in. portable, 27:19 
3-screen TV, 9:18, 11:18 
uhf-equipped sets, 8:16 
warranties, 1:15, 3:20, 18:16, 21:21 
Wells TV, 2:19 
Woolworth, 16:16, 21:21 



MILITARY USE OF TV 

aircraft carrier closed-circuit hookup, 6:11 

Army's Medical TV unit, 1:11, 2:9, 5:9, 6:11 
Pentagon, closed-circuit color TV, 4:5, 15:4 

MOBILIZATION 

Civil Defense, 9:12 

Conelrad, 11:11, 16:8, 18:6, 19:16 

OCDM, 5:13, 6:14, 22:12, 24:13 



Purex women's specials, 21:15 
review, year-end, 3:5, 5:12 
Sarnoff, R. W. Chmn. , 6:4, NS -11:1 
Shore, Dinah, 8:6 
"Some Like It Hot", 14:8 
station break, 24:1 

"station-swap" plans, 2:13, 8:14, 17:4, 18:6 
trademark, 10:6 
'TV & Modern Mktg. ', 14:3 
"The U-2 Affair", 4:11 
"Wagon Train", 8:12 
"Wells Fargo", 9:7, 21:15 
"Whispering Smith", 22:11 

NETWORKING FACILITIES 
duct transmission, 4:13 
microwave predictions, 2:18 
optical maser, 6:7 
relay hop, longest, 22:6 



G\ 

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j-o ( 

:pm, 

redP 



MUSIC AGENCIES 
ASCAP, 10:24, 14:5, 20:11 
BMI, 25:2 
MCA, 13:24, 18:18 

NATIONAL ASSN. OF BROADCASTERS (NAB) 
automatic logging, 3:5 
Board meetings, 6:12, 7:1 

Collins, LeRoy, Pres., 3:3, 5:13, 6:12, 7:1, 9:13, 
10:6&8, 11:10, 12:2Sc9, 13:14, 1 5:2& 1 3, 17:4, 
18:14, 19:14, 20:1, 7&10, 22:2, 26-.3&10; 
program forms, 1A:2 

convention, 39th, 7:6, 11:11, 14:15, 15:12, 16:8, 
17:8, 1 8: 7&8, 19:1&12, 20:p 1 et seq. 
engineering achievement award, 7:16, 20:9 
Engineering Advisory Committee, 10:15 
executive development seminar, 25:12 
favors FCC program forms, 29:5 
forecast, 1:4 
Hartenbower, E. K. , 19:4 
Holland House, 10:15 
House complaints liaison, 14:16 
labor subcommittee, 13:14 
McCollough, Clair R, Chmm. , 1:9, 7:5 
membership, 19:4, 25:11 
movie censorship for TV, 20:5, 24:11 
publications directory 23:3 
Radio Board, 15:12, 25:11 
Radio Code, 25:4 

Radio Code Review Board, 3:16, 7:11, 23:11 
reorganization, 23:13, 25:5 
review, I960, 1:9 
Richards, Robert K. , 11:10 

state bcstrs. assns. pres. Conf. , 5:14, 8:8, 9:8 

TIO, 7:15, 14:15, 20:10, 24:14 

toy industry, 10:14, 23:10 

TV Board, 20:10 

TV Code, 10:15, 25:4, 26:3 

TV Code Review Board 7:11, 14:13, 26:3 

TV Information Committee, 25:11 

Voice of Democracy contest, 2:6, 8:3, 9:9 

Wesson Oil, 10:15 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY (NBC) 
affiliates, 7:10, 19:1, 20:10, 21:13, 26:5 
attacks "wasteland" charge, NS-13:1 
Brinkley, David, 5:13, 11:5, 26:5 
"Carnival Time", 19:9 
"Continental Classroom", 19:8 
"Dr. Kildare", 15:14 
Eastman Kodak billings, 10:5 
foreign interests, 7:8, 19:18, 23:7 
Hope, Bob, 15:7, 21:7, 22:14 
Horton Robert, 22:9 
Huntley, Chet, 11:5 
"The Kuklapolitans", 21:15 
"The Lawless Years", 22:9 
L. A. hq. purchase, 11:9 
"Meet the Press", 5:12 
Moscow May Day coverage, 20:14 
NBC News, 12:6, 19:6, 23:6, 25:15 
newsfilm, wire-syndicated, 6:7, 20:5 
Nigerian TV, NS -3: 2 
"The Outlaws", 18:13 
Paar, Jack, 11:5, 12:7, 26:12 
Participating-Programs Unit, 15:8 
personnel cutbacks, 7:10, 14:14, 16:8 
Phila. Ch. 3, Philco protest, 14:2, 15:5, 16:5 
"Piracy in the Caribbean", 5:6 
P.olicies on tune-in ads, 29:11 
programming 

color, 10:5, 19:6, 21:15, 25:18 
most popular shows poll, 12:7 
movie specials, 8:4, 9:6, 19:8 
public service, 17:12, 18:10 
schedule, 9:5, 11:2, 14:6, 15:7 
"Project 20", 18:10 



NEW STATIONS ON AIR 
forecast, 1:5 

Beaumont, Tex., KBMT, 25:12 
Douglas, Ariz. , KCDA, 10:12 
El Paso, Tex., XEPM-TV, 12:11 
Fresno, Cal., KAIL-TV, NS-14-.6 
Hot Springs, Ark., KFOY-TV, 6:12 
Idaho Falls, Ida., KIFI-TV, 4:6 
Kansas City, Mo., KCSD-TV, 13:13 
Phoenix, Ariz., KAET, 5:14 
Portland, Ore., KOAP-TV, 5:14 
Richland, Wash., KNDU, 33:7 
Shreveport, La., KTAL, 36:11 
Vermillion, S. D. , KUSD-TV, 27:15 

Puerto Rico 

Mayaguez, WIPM-TV, 12:11 
Cana da 

Antigonish, N. S. , CFXU-TV, 27:15 
Banff, Alta., CHCB-TV, 13:13 
Fox River, Que. , CHSM-TV, 8:8 
Halifax, N. S. , CJCH-TV, 3:17 
Harrison Brook, Que., CKCD-TV, 15:13 
Keremeos, B. C. , CHBC-TV-6, 9:9 
Lumby, B. C. , CHBC-TV-5, 6:12 
Montreal, Que., CFCF-TV, 4:6; CFTM-TV, 7:5 
Ottawa, Ont. , CJOH-TV, 11:10 
Pembroke, Ont., CHOV-TV, 37:7 
Pivot, Alta., CHAT-TV-1, 23:12 
Salmon Arm, B. C. , CHBC-TV-4, 25:12 
Sturgeon Falls, Ont., CBFST, 11:10 
Toronto, Ont., CFTO-TV, 1:10 
Virgin Islands 

Charlotte Amalie, WBNB-TV, 29:6 
Stations off Air 

Cadillac, Mich., WWTV (temp.), 5:14, 7:4 
Pocatello, Ida., KTLE, 4:6, 5:14 



NEWSPAPERS 
ad content, 13:9 
AP membership, 14:6 
circulation, 12:8, 20:15 
discounts, 8:11 
Goodson-Todman, 25:12 
TV ownership, 19:15 

PATENTS (See also Antitrust) 
Senate hearings, 15:19, 17:17 



PAY TV 

admen's views, 17:24 
Charge-a -Vision, 4:5 
criticism, 15:3 

Famous Players plans expansion, NS-11:2 
forecast, 1:7 
H&B American, 26:9 
legislation, 2:3, 5:9 
NCTA convention, 26:2 
NTA, 14:9, 15:3, 22ill 
Paramount in Etobicoke, NS-6:2 
protests, 2:9, 4:5, 7:24, 10:7, 13:6 
Teleglobe Pay-TV System Inc., 16:9, 23:9 
Telemeter: (see also Canada); 5:3, 10:3, 14:12 
22:11, 26:9 

TelePrompTer's Key TV System, 5:3, 26:9 
Trouble in Etobicoke, NS-4:4 
West Coast group, 26:9 

Zenith-RKO Hartford test, 1:10, 4:2, 9:1, 14:12, 
19:4; postponed to July 1962, 27:3 



PHONOGRAPHS 

ELA figures, 1:18, 4:18, 8:16, 14:22, 16:18, 

21:22, 25:19 
forecast, 1:16 

Institute of Hi-Fi Mfrs. , 16:18 
Westrex groove tape system, 13:21 

POLITICS 

Daly, Lar, 12:6 

equal-time, 2:4, 5:8, 6:2, 8:9, 9:11, 10:11, 

1 1 : 4& 12, 12:4, 13:15, 14:4&12, 15:6, 23:7 
"Ev & Charlie Show", 13:15, 16:11 
legislation: govt, funds for Presidential cam- 
paigns, 3:16, 6:13, 13:15, 16:6, 20:12 
newsmen's bias, 16:11 

Nixon-Kennedy debates, 3:14, 6:6, 17:12&17 
PR Dept, recommended, 13:16 
Pres. Kennedy, admen rate, 21:12 
Republican Presidential campaign, 4:11 
Section 315, 2:3, 5:8, 6:2, 10:11, 11:13, 22 : 3, 
24:13, 25:7 

'Survey of Political Bcstg. ', FCC study, 16:6 

PRODUCTION, TV -RADIO-PHONO 

ELA figures, 2:16, 3:19, 7:16, 12:16, 15:17, 

20:21, 25:19 
flat-screen TV, 13:19 
forecast, 1:16 

Hoffman quits TV, 7:20, 14:18 
innovations, 1:15, 2:14 
Japanese, 4:17 

plant vacation shutdowns, 26:17 
remote control, 3:23 
17-in. revival, 10:18 
technological advances, 13:5 

TelePrompTer's communication-wall system, 4:16 
transistor TV, 10:18 
uhf-equipped sets, 8:16 

PROGRAMS & PRODUCTION (See also Individual 
Networks) 

broadcasters briefings, 15:13 
Canon 35, 17:13 
cartoons, 21:15 

casualties, 3:15, 4:8, 5:5, 8:12, 11:5, 12:9, 

17:14, 20:16, 21:15, 26:8 
C-E-I-R & ARB merge, 27:16 
censorship, 5:5, 8:5, 9:12, 10:16, 13:12, 20:5, 
23:8 

Chancellor replaces Garroway on Today, 29:9 

children's news shows, 22:4 

city vs. country taste, 32:7 

Civil War series, 14:8, 21:13 

clergymen's favorites, 24:9 

Congressional hearings, 19:8 

cost survey, 2: 10 

court coverage, 23:8 

criticism, 3:15, 6:13, 7:15, 8:5&9, 9:11, 13:12& 
13, 14:16, 20:16, 21:7, 22:5&10, 24:9 
eclipse, sun, 8:5 

editorials, 8:6, 10:7, 12:7, 22:4, 25:11, 26:8 
Eichmann trial, 8:5, 12:11, 18:9 
Festivals: Monaco, 5:6; Montreux, 5:6, 8:7, 

13:7, 20:14, 23:8 
forecast, 1:4&5 
freedom of access, 11:4 
govt, control, 17:16 
immunity for reporters, 19:9, 24:9 
Inauguration, 2:8, 4:7, 5:5 
judges on TV, 22:4 

jury deliberation re-enactment show, 13:13, 14:8, 
15:6, 18:10, 19:8 

legislatures coverage, 3:14&15, 8:6, 11:13, 23:12 
live TV, 19:9, 22:13 

man-in-space shot, 8:5, 14:8, 18:9, 19:7, 20:9& 
14, 21:10 

M-E Productions names Pat Weaver pres., 29:8 
MCA divorcing talent agency, NS-7:4 
network fourth, 26:5 

network nighttime fall schedules, 11:2, 14:6, 

15:7, 17:13, 19:7, 24:9 
new shows ratings, 14:5, 15:7 
newscasts, 9:12 
newsfilm by wire, 20:5 
Northwestern U. 's symposium, 32:1 
O-R-O policies on 40-sec. breaks, 29:11 
plagiarism case, 5:11 

"Play of the Week", 2:10, 6:6, 8:5, 25:13 
"PM East & PM West", 15:6, 17:15, 23:9, 26:12 
predictions, producers, 23:3 
"public interest" definitions, 2:5 
public service 

Collins, LeRoy, NAB Pres., 12:2 
cost, 17:11 



5 



k 



Intertel, 17:16, 23:9, 24:9, 25:15 
local, 1:9, 2:10, 5:10, 7:6, 8:9, 9:8, 16:2, 
17:13, 18:9, 19:9, 23:8, 24:5&8, 26:8 
network, 13:3, 17:11, 25:12 
rates, 2:10 

Westinghouse Pittsburgh Conf. , 16:2&13,17:8 
Wolper, David, 17:12 
quiz shows, 13:12, 24:14, 25:13 
Russian spaceman, 16:11, 17:16 
60-min. shows, 3:8, 6:8, 19:13 
slander conspiracy case, 2:10, 6:7 
specials, 7:15, 13:12, 23:9 

sponsor interference, 21:11 

Storer Bcstg. forms program subsidiary, 28:6 
Storer Bcstg. Standards Dept., 14:15 
Susskind, David, 8:5 
Truman series, 24:9 
TV penetration up to 89.4%# 33:3 
TV specials analyzed by Nielsen, 37:4 
UN coverage, 8:4, 15:12 
Vienna & Paris coverage, 22:13 
violence, 4:7, 6:6, 11:13, 12:2, 13:15, 14:9, 
15:10, 17:14, 18:6, 20:16, 23:3, 24:2, 25:7, 
26:3 

Wagner, Robert Mayor, 24:9 
Westerns, 23:4 

White House "fireside chats", 11:4, 12:7 
White House news confs. coverage, 1:2, 3:15, 
5:2&6, 6:11, 7:4, 8:4&6, 12:7, 17:12, 18:9 

Awards 

Albert Lasker Medical Journalism, 19:18 

All-American ('Radio Daily'), 9:12 

Communications & Public Interest Conf., 6:7 

criticism, 5:6 

Du Pont TV-radio, 13:18 

Edison Foundation mass media, 13:18 

Emmy, 7:13, 12:10, 21:15, 22:5, 25:13 

Freedoms Foundation, 9:13 

George Polk Memorial, 13:18 

National Brotherhood, 9:13 

National Cartoonists Society, 18:13 

National Religious Publicity Council, 17:13 

Ohio State, 11:13 

Oscar, 17:12 

Peabody, 17:13 

RTES Gold Medal, 10:16 

'Saturday Review', 17:13 

'TV Guide 1 , 25:13 

PUBLICATIONS 

magazines, 8-.11&12, 13:9, 17:9, 19:11, 20:15, 
25:9, 26:11 

'Newsweek' control, 11:11 
Stauffer Publications Inc., 7:6 

Television Digest, new publisher, 37:1, NS-1:1 
'Television Factbook', 2:2, 25:6 

R ECOR DS # DISC 

Capitol Records, 1:18, 16:20 

Columbia Records, 20:20 

counterfeiting, 19:21 

Decca Records, 12:20, 18:19, 21:24 

payola, 21:16 

Roulette Records, 22:23 

sales, 23:19 

stereo compatibility, 25:20 
SALES, TV STATIONS 

Communications Capital Corp. , 7:6 
forecast, 1:4 

Bellingham, Wash., KVOS-TV, 14:15 
Big Spring, Tex., KEDY-TV, 27:16 
Buffalo, N. Y. , WKBW-TV, 1:9, 22:5 
Butte, Mont., KXLF-TV, 4:10 
Charleston, S. C. , WCIV (CP), 5:13 
Dayton, O. , WONE-TV (CP), 14:15, 24:5 
Denver, Col, KOA-TV, 35:9 
Enid -Oklahoma City, Okla. , KOCO-TV, 23:13 
Ft. Pierce, Fla., WTVI, 22:6 
Fresno, Cal., KJEO, 10:13, 21:9 
Grand Island, Neb., KGIN-TV (CP), 7:8 
Green Bay, Wis. , WFRV, 2:6 
Greenville, N. C. , WNCT, 15:13 
Helena, Mont., KXLJ-TV, 4:10 
Huntington, W. Va. , WSAZ-TV, 6:12, 14:15 
Kansas City, Mo., KMBC-TV, 6:12 
Lubbock, Tex., KDUB, 27:16 
New Britain, Conn., WHNB-TV, 8:15, 26:10 
New York, N. Y. , WNTA-TV, 8:8, 9:8, 10:13 
11:8, 13:14, 14:2&8, 17:7, 18:14, 19:15, 
21:9, sold, 27:4, Meyner balks, 28:4 
Omaha, Neb., KMTV, 9:9 



Palm Beach, Fla., WPTV, 37:7 

Portsmouth, Va. , WAVY-TV, 16:9 

Rochester, N. Y. , WROC-TV, 5:14, 7:5, 12:11 

Salisbury, Md. , WBOC-TV, 17:7 

San Diego, Cal., KFSD-TV, 4:6 

San Juan, P.R., WAPA-TV, 37:7 

Sedalia, Mo., KMOS-TV, 6:12 

Spokane, Wash., 34:8 

Sweetwater, Tex., KPAR-TV, 27:16 

Weslaco, Tex., KRGU-TV, 35:9 

Weston, W. Va. , WJPB-TV, 24:5 

Yakima, Wash., KNDO, 6:12 

Youngstown, O. , WKST-TV, 16:5 

Yuma, Ariz., KIVA, 6:12 

Canada 

Vancouver, B. C. , CHAN-TV, 10:13 

SECURITIES & EXCHANGE COMMISSION 
(SEC) 

officers & directors stock transaction, 4:20, 

7:22, 12:19, 17:22, 20:23, 25:23 
Skiatron Electronics & TV, 4:19, 18:19 
stock registration requests by firms not listed 
elsewhere, 2:19, 4:19, 7:22, 10:22&23, 14:23, 
15:20, 18:19, 22:21, 24:19 
violations, 18:20, 19:14, 23:13 

SEMICONDUCTORS 

molecular electronics, 26:15 
sales, forecast, 2:17 

transistors: ELA factory figures, 1:18, 6:16, 

9:17, 18:15, 21:22, 26:17 

SOCIOLOGICAL EFFECTS 

Campbell-Ewald's study, 18:9 
children, 16:10 

SPACE COMMUNICATIONS 
allocations study, 2:4 

AT&T, 5:6, 13:7, 14:24, 17:24, 21:7, 25:2 

Congressional inquiry, 13:15, 18:7, 19:17, 21:7 

FCC hearings, 19:16, 22:12, 23:7 

frequency allocation treaty, 21:9 

GE, 18:6, 19:16, 23:7 

ITT, 4:13 

interstellar TV, 13:7 
NASA, 6: 7& 14, 21:7 

ownership, private, 1:11, 10:15, 14:24 
RCA, 13:7, 21:12 
rocket camera, 7:24 
WBC, 16:5, 19:16 

SPOR TS ( See also Subscription TV ) 

"ABC's World of Sports", 15:6 
baseball, 8:6 
bowling, 24:14 

boxing, 1:11, 5:9, 6:9, 11:14, 14:16, 23:4 
football, 15:6, 17:11, 18:9, 19:6 
horse-racing, 5:8 

legislation, 2:3, 5:8, 14:16, 20:12, 23:4 
wrestling, 19:8 
STEREOPHONIC RADIO & TV 
FM 

applications, 22:5 

ELA campaign, 21:20, 22:16 

patents, 19:19 

receivers & adapters, 17:18, 18:16, 19:20, 
20:19, 21:17, 22:17, 23:1, 25:18 
standards, 1:15, 5:18, 7:18, 9:15, 14:19, 16:5, 
17:1, 19:2& 19, 25:21 
station equipment, 18:4, 20:3&19 
station poll, 19:2 

stations on air, 23:1, 24:18, 25:18&21, 26:16 
table models, 25:18 
Kahn AM system, 24:5 

TAPE RECORDING, AUDIO 

cartridges, 1:9, 18:17, 21:20 

Eastman Kodak, 8:17 

forecast, 1:17 

four channel, 17:21 

Westrex groove tape system, 13:2 

T APE RECORDINGS, VIDEO ( See also Ampex 
Corp, and RCA) 

NAB convention, 19:5, 20:4&11 
National Video Tape Productions Inc., 1:12 
NBC TeleSales, 10:3 
Sony recorder, 13:7 

transistorized video-tape recorder, 6:7 
VHF Inc. , 23:14 
Videotape Center, 1:12 

Videotape Productions, 6:9, 11:9, 18:13, 23:14 

6 



TAXES 

excise 

communications, 5:14, 6:11, 10:8 
ham radio receivers, 11:18 
TV-radio commercials, local, 3:17, 6:15 
TV-radio-phono rules, 1:18 
income, 9:11, 16:13, 23:14 
legislation, 2:3 
sales, 7:12 



TUBES, TV PICTURE (See also individual mfrs. 
and Color) 
color, 11:16, 13:19 

Corning samples 16-in. bonded tube, NS-3:5 
Internat. Honie Furnishings Market, 2:14, 3:20 
Motorola 23-in. color tube, 27:19 
RCA's dark heater, 10:20 

sales: factory, ELA figures, 2:16, 7:19, 12:16, 
16:18, 21:22, 25:19; forecast, 2:17 
shields, 2:14, 3:20, 5:15, 7:20, 10:17, 11:18, 
13:22, 16:16, 25:17, 26:16 



UHF (Ultra High Frequency) (see also allocations ) 

Admiral's 3-year plan, NS-4:9 
CP-holder FCC hearings, 12:4 
FCC N. Y. project, 1:8, 10:11, 13:6, 14:11, 
16:4, 17:6, 20:10, 22:12, 25:20 
ownership by vhf in same city, 12:5 
production & sales, 8:16 
shift to all-uhf, 1:9 
tuner research, FCC, 15:16 



UNIONS & GUILDS 

AFL Film Council: runaway production, 3:8, 
7:13 

AFM: foreign recordings, 13:16; WWL-TV 
complaint, 18:6, 20:11 

AFTRA: Pension & Welfare Fund, 25:13; strike; 
KXTV Sacramento, 11:11, 18:14 

AGVA: "National Week", 4:11, 5:9, 25:13,26:14 
Associated Actors & Artists of America, 18:13 
DGA: contract, networks, 4:11, 16:8, 17:13, 
18:8, 19:6, 23:6; residuals, 10:3 

LATSE: ATFP & AMPP contracts, 3:8, 4:8, 
5:10, 6:8; CBS walkout, 15:8; IBEW juris- 
dictional dispute, 3:7 

IBEW: electronics import boycott, 4:17, 5:15, 

9:17, 11:18, 12:13, 16:18, 17:20; network 
contract, 6:11, 7:10; picket, WOGA 
Chattanooga sponsors, 4:6 
Inter -American Entertainment Workers Federa- 
tion, 17:13, 22:9 

NABET: contracts: KYW-TV Cleveland, 7:6; 
network, 6:11; strike, KXTV Sacramento, 
11:11, 18:14, 23:13; WWTV Cadillac, 23:13 

SAG 

contract negotiations: AMG, 1:12; MCA,1:12; 
movies, non-theatrical industrial & 
educational, 5:11, 8:13; TV commercials, 
3:13, 4:8, 6:5, 18:12 
dues raise, 7:12, 11:8 
residuals, 7:12, 8:13, 10:3, 24:10 

SEG, membership meeting, 15:10, 21:14 
TV Producers Guild, 23:14 

WGA 

British writer guild affiliation, 2:11 
election, 11:8 

residuals, 10:3, 14:10, 24:10 
strike: Nelson, Ozzie, 5:10, 6:8 
Tors, Ivan, fined, 21:14 
TV-radio writers awards, 7:13 
"TV on Trial" panel, 22:8, 23:15 



VOICE OF AMERICA 

Murrow, Edward R. Dir., 6:3, 7:14, 12:2, 13:^ 
22:3, 25:14 

radio station, roving, 5:9 

USLA: budget, 4:10, 23:4, 26: 14; cabinet status, 
7:14; criticism, 3:16; foreign TV report, 
17:16; TV film distribution abroad, 16:13 



) 



(It 

H. 



;-o, 

PM, 

'edif 



MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANDISERS 



ADLER ELECTRONICS INC. 

1:10, 8:10, 9:19, 10:22, 18:20, 19:24, 23:18, 
33:20 

ADMIRAL CORP. 

Canadian Admiral, 20:24 
dealer convention, 7:20 

financial reports, 14: 23, 1 6: 1 9, 20: 22, 33: 20, NS8:10 
"Fringelock" litigation with Zenith settled, 35: 17 
hotel equipment, 22:21 
models, new, 12:15&16, 13:22, 19:22 
NARDA Chicago convention, 4: 16 
1962 line, 21:18, 22:19 
radios, 16:19 
TV sets, 7:20 

ALLIED RADIO , 12:20, 26:20, NS-15-.10 

AMERICAN BOSCH ARMA, 11:20, 1.4:21, 18: 18& 1 9, 
34:16, NS-8: 1 2 

AMERICAN ELECTRONIC LABS, 4:20, 24:19 
AMERICAN ELECTRONICS, 5:19, 17:23, 18:18, 
20:24, 21:21, 25:21 

AT&T, 3:24, 5:6, 9:20, 13:7, 14:24, 16:20, 17:24, 

21 :9&24, 24:19, 25:2, 29:20 
AMPEX CORP . 

Ampex Audio-Prof. Products Co, merger, 6:18 
Ampex Video Products Co., 8:7 
financial reports, 6:20, 11:20, 13:24, 25:22&24, 
35:20 

models, new, 5:18 

Oscar Class II Award, 15:7 

tape recorders, 11:14, 12:12 

AMPHENOL-BORG ELECTRONICS CORP . 

5:19, 8:20, 9:16, 14:21&22, 20:24, 22:23, 31:24, 
NS-9: 10 

ANDREA RADIO CORP. , 10:22, 17:21, 22:22. 

NS-1 1:12 

ARVIN INDUSTRIES INC ., 5:18, 8:20, 18:18, 31:24 

AUDIO DEVICES , 16:20, 18:19 

AV CO CORP. , 5:20, 13:24, 18:19, 27:24 

AVNET ELECTRONICS, 1:20, 8:20, 12:18, 20:22, 
21:24, NS-9: 10 

BECKMAN INSTRUMENTS 

2:17, 4:20, 5:20, 9:19, 18:18, 36:16 

BELOCK INSTRUMENT , 8:20, 19:20, 28:20 

BENDIX RADIO DIV. , BENDIX CORP . 

1:20, 8:20, 10:22, 21:24, NS-11:12 

CLAROSTAT MFG. , 16:20, 20:24, 37:16 

CLEVITE CORP. , 11:20, 19:24, 24:19, 32:24, 

NS-9: 10 

COHU ELECTRONICS, 15:20, 18:18, 19:24 

COLLINS RADIO, 3:24, 13:24, 22:19, 26:20, 

NS-1 5: 10 

CBS INC. , 7: 14&23, 9:18, 17:10, 20:24, 23:18 
Quits semiconductor field, 37:13 

CONRAC INC. , 6:16, 9:19, 10:19&22, 17:22 

CONSOLIDATED ELECTRONICS IND. , 9:16,23:19, 
25:24 

CORNING GLASS , 2:14, 3:20, 4:16, 6:19&20, 10:17, 
11:18, 13:22, 16:18, 17:20&23, 21:21, 25:17, 
28:20, NS-8: 1 2 

CROSBY-TELETRONICS INC ., 6:16, 7 : 18&23, 

10:22, 14:19, 26:18 

files Chapter X petition, NS-10:11 

DALTO ELECTRONICS , 4 : 12&16 

DAYSTROM CORP. , 5;20, 22 : 21, 24:20 

DELMONICO INTERNATIONAL 
3:23, 6:17, 9:18, 14 : 18&20 



DOMINION ELECTROHOME INDUSTRIES LTD. 

2:15, 7:20, 10:22 

DYNAMICS CORP. OF AMERICA, 14 : 23, 17:21, 
18:18, 20:24, 31:24 

EIT EL- McCULLOUGH, 18:18, 20:24, 34: 1 6 

ELECTRONIC ASSISTANCE CORP ., 4:20, 13:2 4 

ELECTRONIC ASSOCIATES , 11:19&20, 20:24, 

24: 19&20 

ELECTRONICS CORP. OF AMERICA , 11:20, 23:19 

ELECTRONICS SPECIALTY CO. , 1:20, 5:19, 11:19, 
14:21, 17:23 

ELECTRO- VOICE, 5:20, 24:20, 26:20, 32:24 

EMERSON RADIO & PHONOGRAPH CORP . 
Argentina subsidiary, 12:17 
Du Mont Emerson Corp. , 10:21 
Du Mont line, 2:17, 19:20, 25:20 
Emertron Inc. , 5:17, 24:19 
financial reports, 2:19, 5:20, 13:24, 22:22, 

NS-1 5:10 

Fleetwood Corp. , Montreal, 13:22 
forecast for 1961, 8:18 
Granco Products control, 8:19 
Israel production, 9:18 
1962 line, 25:20 
Peru licensee, 22:20 
price-cuts, 11:18 
speaker system, 25:20 

Telectro Industries merger, 11:19, 17:20 
Uruguay licensee, 22:20 

ERIE RESISTOR , 9:18, 13:24, 16:20, 20:24, 21:24, 
NS-1 1:12 

FAIRCHILD CAMERA & INSTRUMENT CORP . 
cable production plant purchase, 4:19 
Curtis Labs & Circle Weld purchase, 20:22, 

21:21 

Du Mont Labs, 11:18, 26:18 
financial reports, 12:20, 18:18, 24:19, 30:24, 
NS-9: 10 

International Div. , 15:17 
Waste King Corp. purchase, 9:16 

FEDERAL PACIFIC ELECTRIC, 10.22, 21:24 



FOTO -VIDEO ELECTRONICS, 20:4, 21:24 



GABRIEL CO. , 8:20, 


18:18, 


31: 


: 24 




GENERAL BRONZE, 


13:24, 


19: 


24, 


32:24 


GENERAL DYNAMICS, 6:16 


, 7: 


•20, 


13:24, 



17:21, 20:24, 33:20, NS-10:12 
Stromberg-Carlson auto radio business sold, 
NS- 15: 9 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 

Auburn, N. Y. , plant, 23:19 
Canadian GE, 11:20 
color, 9:16, 13:19, 16:15 

Communication Products Dept. Dallas office, 
18:16 

Communications Satellites Inc., 18:6 
Compactrons, 12:16, 13:22 
distribution system, 10:19 
financial reports, 6:20, 12:19, 17:22, 29:20 
imports, 6:17 

IUE propaganda campaign, 12:17 
Lynchburg, Va. plant, 2:17 
models, new, 2:17, 13:22 
NLRB charges, 9:18 
New Concord, O. , center, 22:17 
1962 line, 23:17, 25:20 
Phoenix, Ari*. plant, 5:16 
Pittsfield, Mass, plant, 17:21 
price-fixing case, 7:18, 10:19, 12:18, 13:6, 
14: 1&20, 15:18. 25:21 
rectifiers, selenium, 5:16 
science kits, 7:19 
station equipment shipments, 17:6 
stylus diamonds, 19:20 
Sunnyvale, Cal. lab, 2:17 
TV monitors, 10:15 



TV sets: 19-in. portable, 1:15; 1£ TV-base 
sale, 10:20; shields, 7:20 
Valley Forge, Pa. center, 12:17 
water cooler, 14:22 

GENERAL INSTRUMENT CORP. 

financial reports, 3:24, 22:22, 29:20 
Hicksville, N. Y. plant, 2:17 
nuvistor uhf tuner, 10:20 

Pyramid Electric acquisition, 12:15, 20:22, 
21:21 

GENERAL PRECISION EQUIPMENT CORP . 
financial reports, 7:23, 8:20, 15:20, 18:18, 
33:20, NS- 10: 10 
Martin Co. suit, 9:19 
SEC registration, 14:24, 18:20 

GENERAL TELEPHONE & ELECTRONICS 

financial reports, 9:20, 13:19, 16:19, 17:23 

GLOBE-UNION, 9:20, 18:18, 31:24, NS-8 : 12 

GRANCO PRODUCTS , 2:15, 11:18, 12:15, 25:18 

HA LLICR AFTERS, 1:20, 12:20, 16:19, 18:20, 
22:22, 24:19, 25:24, 26:20 

HAR MAN-KAR DON , 3:21, 5:18, 7:19, 10:19 

HAZELTINE ELECTRONICS CORP. , 2:20, 12:20, 
35:20 

HEROLD RADIO & ELECTRONICS, 5:18, 20:22, 
36:16 

HEWLETT-PACKARD . 6:20, 7:23, 9:20, 13:24, 
14:21, 17:21, 22 : 22, 23:19, 24:19 

HOFFMAN ELECTRONICS CORP . 

commercial-products div., 12:15 
financial reports, 7:23, 15:20, i 8: 18, 20:22, 
26:19, 31:24, NS-8:12 
international trade dept., 5:18 
quits TV & hi-fi business, 7:20, 14:18 

INDIANA GENERAL , 9:20, 18:18, 19:24, 24:18, 
32:24, NS-8: 1 2 

INTERNATIONAL RECTIFIER , 8:20, 12:19, 19:24, 
25:21 &23 

INTERNATIONAL RESISTANCE CO. 



2:19, 


4:18, 6: 


: 1 6, 


, 8: 


20, 10:21, 12:17, 


19:24, 


NS 


-10:12 










ITT, 4:13. 


, 18&19, 


7: 


19, 


12:16, 1 3: 1 7&24, 


15: 19, 


17:21, 


20:24, 


21 


:21 


, 33:20, NS-9: 10 





JERROLD ELECTRONICS CORP . 
acquires TACO, 37:13 
annual report, 5:19 
CATV equipment, 4:5, 24:7 
CATV systems, 2:9, 4:5, 13:17 
financial report, 24:20 
Harman Kardon purchase, 10:19 
Huntingdon Valley, Pa. lab, 5:18 

LAFAYETTE RADIO ELECTRONICS CORP. 

6:18, 7:23, 9:19, 12:18&20, 22:22 

LAB for ELECTRONICS, 27:24 

LING-TEMCO ELECTRONICS, 4 : 19, 5:19, 6:16& 
18, 9:16, 10:19, 13:24, 14:21, 21:24, 23:19, 
24:18 

LITTON INDUSTRIES, 10:22, 11:18, 12:17, 16:19, 
23:20, NS-8: 1 2, NS-11:12 

LORAL ELECTRONICS, 4:20, 5:19, 9:16, 13:21, 
14:21, 15:17, 18:16, 23:19, 24:18, 27:24 

LYNCH , 34:16, NS-10 : 12 

MAGNA VOX CO. 

dealer franchises, 7:19 

financial reports, 3:24, 7:24, 14:23, 15:20, 
16:19, 18:18, NS-8:12 



7 



Greenville, Tenn. plant, 5:18 
Jefferson City, Tenn. plant walkout, 9:18, 

14:22 

models, new, 3:22 
1962 line, 23:17 
organ, electric, 12:17 
Paducah, Ky. plant, 2:15 
stock, 17:22, 19:23 
tape recorder, 24:17 
warranty, labor — parts, 21:21 

MAJESTIC INTERNATIONAL , 3:23, 24:17 

P. R. MALLORY & CO. , 6:20, 15:19, 17:23, 23:19, 
29:20 

MICROWAVE ASSOCIATES, 14:23, 19:24, 21:24 

MINNEAPOLIS-HONEY WELL , 6:20, 17:23 

MINNESOTA MINING & MFG. , 8:19, 9:16, 18:17, 
20:24, 21:20, 33:20, NS-9:10 

MOTOROLA INC . 

antennas, auto, 5:18 
Canadian mfg. & mktg. , 10:20 
color, 9:16 

debentures, 14:24, 18:20 

financial reports, 12:20, 19:23, 31:24, NS-8:12 
imports, 6:17 

Lowry Electronics Inc,, 11:17 
models, new, 2:17, 3:22 
Phoenix, Ariz. plant, 22:17 
radios, 15:17 
traffic control test, 17:24 

MUNTZ TV INC. , 2:17, 3:24, 14:22&23, 26:19, 
NS-8: 12, NS-15:10 

MUTER CO ., 6:18, 14:23, 17:21&23, NS-10:12 



NATIONAL CO. INC ., 2 : 19, 13:24 



NATIONAL UNION, 


14:23, 


20:24, 


24:17, 


36:16 


NS-10:12 










NATIONAL VIDEO, 


5:18, 


16:16, 


24:19, 


28:20 



NEWARK ELECTRONICS , 1:20, 14:23 



OAK MFG. CO., 9:20, 10:19, 13:21, 14:23, 

19:20, 21:24, 24:20, 25:23, NS-10:12 

OLYMPIC RADIO & TV DIV. , SIEGLER CORP . 
1:18, 6:17, 17:21, 26:18 

PACIFIC INDUSTRIES , 3:24, 12:20, 26:20, 

NS-1 5: 10 

PACIFIC MERCURY ELECTRONICS, 4:19, 16:20, 
NS-1 1:12 

PACKARD-BELL ELECTRONICS CORP . 
expansion eastward, 9:15, 14:21 
financial reports, 5:20, 14:23, 18:18, 33:20, 
NS- 1 5: 10 

lockout of employes, 11:19 
models, new, 5:18, 18:17 
1962 line, 24:17, 25:19 
wall TV, 24:17 

PERKIN-ELMER , 8:20, 23:20 

PHILCO CORP . 

Air Force contract, 22:19 

Bendix Home Appliance, France, 2:15 

bought by Ford, NS-1A:5 

Colombia licensee, 5:18 

color, 9:16, 24:15 

financial reports, 10*23, 15:18, 21:23, 33:20, 
NS-9: 10 

foreign market operations, 4:14, 10:23 
Fort Washington, Pa. hq. , 18:17 
models, new, 2:17, 17:20 
1962 line, 23:17, 24:15, 25:19 
Phila. Ch. 3 protest, 14:2, 15:5, 16:5 
receiving tube production, 23:18, 26:19 
Skinner replaced by Beck, NS-14:10 
TV sets: ETV, 24:17; Predicta, 15:18; 

warranty, parts & labor, 1:15 
Washington exhibit, 21:21 

PHILIPS LAMP WORKS. 19:24, 23:20, NS-11:12 



POLARAD ELECTRONICS . 8:20, 18:16, 26:17 

RCA 

AFTE contract, 25:18 
airborne TV system, 13:7 
beverage-inspection equip, sale, 13:21 
Burns, John L. Pres., £4:18 
circuitry, electronic, 7:20 
color, 2:15, 4:19, 9:16, 11:16, 13:22 
dark heater, 10:20 
dealer scholarships, 17:20 
Engstrom named president, NS-12:1 
fellowships, 10:21 

financial reports, 10:24, 19:21, 23:19, 30:24 
future products, 20:21 
imports, 11:16'’ 

IUE contract, 24:18 
microwave, longest, 22:6 
models, new, 9:18, 12:15 

N. Y. uhf project transmitter contract, 10:11 
1962 line, 21:18, 22:15 
nuvistors, 7:18, 12:16 

Palm Beach, Fla., data-processing center, 

22:18 

Princeton, N. J. center, 9:17, 12:17 

promissory notes, 7:24 

radios, 9:18, 19:22 

RCA Sales Corp. , 7:20 

reorganization, 11:15 

seagoing TV system, 6:11 

tape recorders, 1:9, 10:15, 11:14, 21:16; 

shipments, 11:11 
translator equip., 4:5 
TV distribution system, 1:11 
TV sets 

color-TV test instrument, 7:20 
DC-restoration circuit, 3:22 
portables, 14:19 
sales forecast, 9:18 
vhf transmitter, 14:15 

RAYTHEON MFG. CO., 5:20, 6:16, 7:21, 16:20, 
18:16, 22:20, 32:34 

HOWARD W. SAMS & CO. , 4:20, 6:18, 18:17&18, 
21:19, 24:18, 36:16 

SANGAMO ELECTRIC, 11:20, 19:24, NS-11-.12 

SEEBURG CORP . , 5:20, 11:20, 27:24 

SIEGLER CORP ., 6:16, 8:20, 18:18, 33:20, 36:16, 
NS-12:11 

SONOTONE, 5:19, 9:16, 13:24, 20:24, 35:20, NS-11:12 
NS-1 3:12 

SONY CORP . , 6:7, 9:19, 13:7, 18:17, 19:23, 24:19 
stock offering, 27:21 

SPEER CARBON CO ., 4:18, 11:20, 19:24, NS-11:12 

SPRAGUE ELECTRIC, 1:19, 6:18, 9:17, 13:24, 32:24 

STANDARD KOLLSMAN INDUSTRIES 
Bedford Blanket merger, 1:20 
Casco Products, 12:15, 18:16 
financial reports, 10:22, 18:18, 24:19, 31:24, 
NS-8: 12 

stock split, 25:24 
warranties, 5:17 

STEWART -WARNER , 12:20, 18:18, NS-9: 10 

STROMBERG-CARLSON, 7:18, 16:17, 17:21 

SYLVANIA ELECTRIC PRODUCTS CO. 
color, 9:16, 10:17 
color set announced, 30:21 
Houtzdale, Pa. plant, 22:21 
imports, 6:17 
inventory protection, 23:19 
IUE contract, 7:20 
Mill Hall, Pa. plant, 5:18 
models, new, 10:21, 18:17 
1962 line, 22:15 
phosphor, 25:21 
picture-tube exports, 10:20 
Purolator promotion, 4:18 
radio warranty, 18:16 
Sylvania Electro-Specialties, 13:20 
TV sets: color, 6:18; new models, 2:17 
Warren, Pa. plant, 22:17 



SYMPHONIC ELECTRONIC, 3:22, 4:19, 6:19 
19:24, 22: 1 9& 23, 23:18, 24:17, 25:18 
buys Hoffman dies, 29:18 

TECHNICOLOR , 8:20, 19:24, 31:24 

TELECTRO INDUSTRIES, 11:19, 12:20, 13:21, 
14:24, 22:22 

TELEPROMPTER CORP . 

CATV systems, 7:24, 10:8, 24:7 
communication-wall system, 4:16 
education aids, 20:18 
financial reports, 17:23, 20:24 
Key TV system, 5:3 

Patterson- Johansson fight, 1:11, 5:9, 6:9, 
11:14 

production-services div. , 8:10 



TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, 4:18, 10:22, 11:20, 17:23, 
22:19, 25:21, 34:16, NS-8:12 



TEXTRON ELECTRONICS, 10:22, 18:16, 20:22, 
21:24 



THOMPSON RAMO WOOLDRIDGE 

financial reports, 9:20, 18:18, 28:20, 31:24 
Pacific Semiconductors, 7:19, 8:20, 10:23 
Radio Condenser Co. purchase, 1:19, 10:23, 
19:20 

SEC registration, 12:20, 23:20 
Space Technology Labs, 2:17, 10:23 

TRANSITRON ELECTRONIC , 5:20, 6:19, 7:23, 
16:17, 22:22, 37:16, NS-10:12 



TRAV-LER , 30:24 



TUNG-SOL ELECTRIC , 9:20, 18:19, NS-9:10 

VARIAN ASSOCIATES , 6:20, 12 ; 18, 18:20, 19:24, 
NS-1 1: 12 



VICTOREEN INSTRUMENTS CO. , 12:18, 13:24 



WEBCOR, INC., 1:18, 3:24, 7:21, 8:19, 14:23, 
NS-9: 10 



WELLS-GARDNER ELECTRONICS, 12:16, 15:20, 
16:17, 19:23, 32:24, NS-8:12 



WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP . 
bottled-water cooler, 13:21 
color, 9:16 

financial reports, 5:20, 10:21, 18:19, 31:24, 
NS-10: 1 2 

generator, thermoelectric, 4:13 

home appliance & equip, contract, 7:20 

kitchen ranges, electric, 9:18 

models, new, 3:22 

molecular electronics, 26:15 

price-fixing case, 14:1&20, 15:18, 21:24 

sales, 2:20 

scholarships, 25:21 

Science Talent Research, 10:21 

SEC registration, 10:24 

Teletronic Systems purchase, 4:19 

TV sets: production, 26:19; warranties, 1:17 



WILCOX-GAY, 17:23, 26:19 

ZENITH RADIO CORP. 
ad campaign, 17:21 
color TV, 9:2&14, 11:16 
ELA, quits, 22:17 

financial reports, 6:19, 11:20, 18:19, 33:20 

hearing aid, 12:15 

imports, 6:17 

models, new, 12:15 

1962 line, 24:17, 25:19&20 

pay TV, 1:10, 4:2, 9:1, 14:12, 19:4 

radios, 6:18 

Rauland, 22:21 

TV-stereo line, 1:15 



8 



WEEKLY 



JULY 31, 1961 



Television Digest 



© 1961 TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. 



VOL. 17: NO. 31 



The authoritative service for executives in all branches of the television arts & industries 



Index to Television Digest, 1961: First Half 

Volume 17, Issues No. 1 through 26 (Issued Quarterly) 

References are grouped into three major categories: General (pages 1-5), Manufacturers and Merchandisers 
(pages 5 & 6), Supplements (page 1). Index attempts to cover only items considered to be of more than passing 
interest. Reference numbers following each item designate issue and page of Newsletter in which item appeared. 







ADVERTISING 

advertisers 

American Airlines, 22:10 
Argus Camera, 10:13 

auto industry, 4 :2, 7 :11, 8 :6, 9 :10, 13 :8, 17 :10 
Auto-Lite, 9 :10 
Ayds, 13 :9 

beer, 2 :8, 4 :3, 7 :11, 14 :13, 21 :12 
bell & Howell, 9:10 
cigarets, 6 :5. 9 :5, 21 :11, 23 :11 
Colgate-Palmolive, 19 :9 
Crayola, 11:13 
defense contractors, 14 :13 
Du Pont, 10 :6 
Eastman Kodak, 10 :5 
Firestone Tire & Rubber, 2:10 
General Foods, 7 : 1 0 , 9 :5 
’ H^’Iand House, 10:15 
Johnson’s Wax, 9:5 
Kahlua Liquer, 2 :6 
Korvette, 17 :9 
Kraft Foods, 20:16 
Manger hotels, 2 :9 
Martinson’s coffee, 16:13 
Metrecal, 22 :13 
new, 6 :10 

Oil cos., 5:6, 6:5, 10:3, 17:12, 18:10, 22:10 

Pepsi-Cola, 7 :11 

Procter & Gamble, 6:11, 24:6 

Prudential, 11:13 

Rokeach, 14 :13 

Shick, 6:5 

swimming pools, 25:10 
toy industry, 2:8, 10:14, 13:9, 20:15 
TvB : category studies. 1:13, 9:10, 12:6, 13:12, 
16:7, 18:10, 19:7, 22:10, 23:11, 24:6, 25:10; 
top 100, 25:10 
watches, 7 :11, 16 :13 
Wesson Oil, 10 :15 
AAAA, 14:13, 17:9 

Advertising Council, 12 :9, 14 :15, 24 :14 
AFA, 4:3, 6:4, 19:11, 22:9, 23:10 
agencies 

billings, 7:11 
Gardner, 20 :15 
JWT, 4:2, 13:11 
M-E. 4 :3 

Minow, reactions to, 20:6 
Y&R, 23 : 10, 24 :6, 25 :9 
ANA, 11 :13 
billboard, 25 :7 
budget trends, 11:3 
commercials 

American TV Festival, 6:5, 8:13, 12:9, 19:11 
Bert & Harry Piel, 18:10 
“best”, 1 :13 

Broadcast Advertisers Reports Inc., 22:9, 23:10 
Cascade Pictures of Cal., 23 :15 
cost control, 24 :6 
criticism, 13 :9, 21 :11 
“good” defined, 13 :9 
hard-liquor, 3:16 
product protection, 13:8 
30-min., 19:11 
Y&R, 23 :10, 25 :9 
co-op adv., 10:14 
CPM, ABC’s lowest, 14 :14 
credibility poll, 17 :9 
criticism, 2 :7, 6 :4 
daytime sales, 11:9 
forecast, 1 :4&5 
legislation, 6 :4 



NAB 



local TV sales successes, 8 :11, 10 :14, 15 : 14, 17 :7, 
23:11 

magazine concept, 3 :6, 5 :12, 7 :3&10, 21 :10, 23 :7 

market brand preference studies, 2 :7 

media buyers, 24 :7 

media costs, 5 :7 ; profits, 17 :10 

National Advertising Week, 6:4 

NBC’s booklet, ‘TV & Modern Mktg.’, 14 :3 

network sales outlook, 9 :5 

‘Printers’ Ink’ figures, 5:7, 14:13, 23:6 

program control, 21:12 

Reps 

agency survey, 19:11 

Avery-Knodel groceries & drugs survey, 13 :8 
Branham best, div., 20:15 
business outlook survey, 8 :2, 9 :9 
Crosley Bcstg. Corp., 16 :9 
rate-card revisions, 1:13, 18:11 
Station Reps Assn., 9:13, 15:14 
Storer TV Sales Inc., 6:12 
spot rate revision, 10:13 

spot TV, 6:5, 8:2&12, 9:9, 10:13, 14:2, 18:10, 
22:10, 24:6 

station break, 42-sec., 16:7, 17 :8&9, 18:1, 19:10, 
21 :7&11, 24:1, 26:11 
timebuyers, 7:11, 8:7, 24:7 

TvB: membership, 12:11; network gross time 
billings, 3:8, 6:10, 10:6, 15:8. 18:9, 19:6, 

22:13, 26:6; sales clinics, 15:13, 26:11; ‘TV 
Basics 4’, 18:10 

volume: 1960, 8:2; 1961 prediction, 2:9 
ALLOCATIONS 

Canadian-U.S. agreement, 14:11 
channel shifts, 7 :7&8, 8:15, 26:14 
deintermixture 

Bakersfield, 11 :6, 13 :6 
Fresno, 7:8, 8:8, 9:9, 11:11, 12:11, 16:4 
legislation, 13 :15 
petitions, 19 :16 
digital TV technique, 5 :6 
FCC policy, 2:1, 5:1, 18:4 
forecast, 1 :5 

international agreement, 7 :8 

multi-city identifications, 6:12, 18:6, 21:9, 26:14 

Rochester 3rd vhf, 17 :6, 19:14 

site changes, 14:12, 15:13 

spectrum space, 2 :3, 4 :10, 10 :1 

Syracuse 3rd vhf, 17 :6 

uhf : Ch. 37 for radio astronomy ; scatter, 

16 :4 ; shift to all-uhf, 1 :9 



AM (Standard) BROADCASTING 

ABC Radio, 4:11, 10:7, 14:24 
amateur radio week, 6:13, 13:16 
clear channel FCC decision, 19:16, 25:9 
criticism, 9:12 

daytime hours legislation, 4 :11, 5 :9, 9 :11, 12 :4 
Edison radio amateur award, 6 :7, 9 :5 
EIA figures: retail sales, 2:16, 7:16, 12:16, 20:21 
forecast, 1 :4&6 
Kahn stereo system, 24 :5 
KBLT Big Lake, Tex., 19:16 
Mexican-U.S. agreement, 25:11 
National Radio Month, 15:12, 17:16 
Radio Free Europe, 5:14, 20:10 
Samoan licenses, 19:17 
shipboard radio equip., 9:11, 13:16 
station totals, 4 :2 
WBZA Springfield, Mass., 6:12 
Station Sales 

Cincinnati, O., WSAI, 5:13, 11:11 
Concordia, Kan., KFRM, 6:12 
Dayton, O., WONE & WIFE, 14:15 
Denver, Colo., KHOW, 6:12 
Des Moines, la., KIOA, 19:16 
Flint, Mich., WTAC, 11:11 
Glendale, Cal., KIEV, 9:10 
Houston, Tex., KTHT, 8:15 ; KXYZ, 23:5 
Los Angeles, Cal., KRKD, 1 :9, 13 :6 
Palm Springs, Cal., KCMJ, 17:7 
Paterson, N.J., WPAT, 21:16 
Canada 

Toronto, Ont., CKEY, 8:8, 10:13 
AMERICAN BROADCASTING COMPANY (ABC) 

“ABC Final Report”, 15 :6 

ABC International TV Inc., 15 :8, 17 :12 

ABC News, 9:5, 12:6 

AB-PT 

financial reports, 10:24, 13:24, 18:18, 21:23 
foreign interests, 10 :7 
Hazel Bishop Co. suit, 26:11 
Selmur Productions, 1 :12, 6:9 
sit-in demonstration, 24:12 
stock increase, 16 :20 
Visual Electronics Corp., 16:8 
affiliates, 9:3, 10:13, 14 :14, 19:1, 20:10, 26:6 
“American Business Briefing”, 22 :5 
Bing Crosby special, 12:6, 20:16 
foreign network sales, 4:11, 13 :17 



Supplements and Special Reports Published During 1961 

References are to issues & pages of Television Digest with articles pertaining to the supplements. 



Directories 

Annual AM-FM Directory of Jan. 1 ; with weekly 
Addenda reporting current FCC decisions, ap- 
plications, etc. Listings of all AM-FM stations 
by states and frequencies, all applications by 
states and frequencies, call letter lists, etc. 
(Includes other North American stations.) 
Semi-Annual TV Factbook (Spring-Summer, No. 
32) with weekly Addenda reporting current FCC 
grants, applications, new stations on air, etc. 

Special Supplements 

Index to Television Digest, 1960: Volume 16. Index 
to 1960 Television Digest Newsletters & Special 
Reports. (Vol. 17 :4). 

FCC Public Notice on Program Forms. Full text 
of FCC’s Public Notice 61-223 393. (Vol. 17:9). 
The Television Network, and American Society. An 
ddress <by Robdrt/w; Shroff. (Vol. 17:15). 

L ,/ 



FCC Rules on Stereophonic FM Broadcasting. Full 
text. (Vol. 17:17) 

Addresses by FCC Chmn. Newton N. Minow and 
NAB Pres, LeRoy Collins to the 39th Annual 
NAB Convention. Full text. (Vol. 17:20). 
Financial Data on Electronics & Broadcasting 
Companies. Statistical summaries of reports of 
leading publicly-owned companies. Prepared by 
Greenebaum & Associates, financial consultants 
in electronics. (Vol. 17:21). 

Television Households by States & Counties. ARB 
survey-based estimates as of January 1, 1961. 
(Vol. 17:26). 

Special Reports 

Telefilm Candidates for Next Season’s Programs. 

(Vol. 17:3 pp3&9). 

Tentative Network Program Lineups for Fall. 

Chart. (Vol. 17:14 pp 6&7). 



ABC — (Continued) 

Hagerty, James C., 3:8, 8:5, 18:9, 26:5 

“The Islanders”, 3:15 

Miami meeting, 2:13, 3:7 

National TV Sales, 26 :6 

newsfilm by wire, 20 :5 

“Peter Gunn”, 11:5 

reruns, 25 :12 

"The Roosevelt Years”, 12 :7 
schedule, fall, 11:3, 14:6, 15:7 
signal synchronizer. 15:13 
“Silents Please”, 6 :7 
standards converter, 21 :12 

station break. 40-sec., 16:7, 17 :8&9, 18:1, 19:10, 
21 :7&11, 24 :1 
Treyz, Oliver Pres., 16:11 

“The Untouchables”, 3:14, 4:7, 5:9, 6:6, 8:3. 

9:12, 11:5, 12:7, 13:9, 14:6, 15:5&9, 16:6, 25:14 
“The Valiant Years,” 8 :4, 18 :13, 24 : 12 
West Coast expansion, 25:16 

ANTITRUST (See also Patents) 

electrical equip, price-fixing, 7 :8&18, 10:19, 

12:18, 13:6, 14:1, 15:18, 21:21, 25:21 
House hearings, 23:4 
RCA-NBC, 14:2 

resistor price-fixing conspiracy, 4:18, 24:18 
tube pricing, 24:18 

APPLICATIONS & CPs FOR NEW TV STATIONS 
Initial Decisions 

Columbia, S.C., Ch. 25, 16:5 
Greensboro, N.C., Ch. 8, 11:7 
Lafayette, La., Ch. 3, 24 :5 
Medford, Ore., Ch. 10, 14:12 
New Bedford, Mass., Ch. 6, 17 :6 
Panama City, Fla., Ch. 13. 7 :7 
Portland, Ore., Ch. 2, 10:12 
Reno. Nev., Ch. 4, 18:6 
Final Decisions 

Christiansted, St. Croix, V.I., Ch. 8, 6:12 
Medford, Ore., Ch. 10, 22:12 
Court Decisions 
Beaumont, Tex., Ch. 12, 8:15 
ASSOCIATIONS (not listed under other categories) 
Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, 22 :8 
Academy of TV Arts & Sciences, 5:10&11, 13:13, 
14:8, 19:8, 20:10 

American Woman in Radio & TV, 17 :7, 19 : 1 4 
Broadcast Pioneers, 4:12, 20:10 
Bcstrs. Promotion Assn., 4 :6, 7 :6 
Federal Bar Assn., 6 :4 
Fla. Assn, of Bcstrs., 25:11 
Inter-American Assn, of Bcstrs., 20:10 
Maximum Service Telecasters, 15:13, 19:16, 20:11 
National Automobile Dealers Assn., 6 :4 
National Religious Bcstrs. Inc., 5:14 
Radio-TV Correspondents Assn., 9:13 
Radio & TV Exec. Society, 14:15, 22:14 
Radio-TV News Directors Assn., 11 : 1 3 
Society of TV Pioneers, 20:11 

BOOSTERS & TRANSLATORS 

application forms, 17 :6 
rebroadcast permission, 2 :9 
uhf boosters : on channel, 4 :5, 21 :5 
uhf translator burned, 14 :12 

vhf boosters: applications, 4:4, 13:17; hearings, 
7 :24, 10 :8 ; protests, 1 :10 
vhf translators : applications, 4 :5 ; on air. 9 :10 ; 

station ownership, 21 :9 
Western Translator Conf., 8:10 

CLOSED-CIRCUIT “MEETING” TV 
automotive industry, 10 :8 

Dalto Electronics' portable TV projector, 4:12 
forecast, 1 :7 

Giantview General projector systems, 13 :17 
hotel network. 13:16 
medical TV, 17 :24 
TNT, 14:12, 24:7, 25:22 

COLOR 

black & white system, 16 :9 

forecast, 1:16 

GE, 14:18, 16:15, 20:4 

Internat. Home Furnishings Market, 2:15, 3:20 
Japan, 9 :17 

Lawrence tube, 14 :18, 24 :15 
NBC. 10:5, 19:6, 25:18 
Philco, 24 :15 

RCA, 2:15, 4:19, 14:18, 20:4 
roundup, 16:15 
Sears Roebuck, 20:19 
single gun tubes, 14:18 
TNT closed-circuit, 14:12 
Zenith, 9:2*14 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM (See also 
CBS Inc. under Mfrs.) 

“Adventure Theater”, 22 :5 

affiliates, 7 :10. 18 :14, 19 :1, 20 :10, 21 :10 

"Big City — 1980”, 5 :6 

Boone, Richard, 8:12 

“Candid Camera", 9:12 

“The College of the Air”, 19 :8 

CBS News, 6 :10. 10:6, 12:6. 17:13 



“Eyewitness to History”, 2:10 
Foundation: fellowships, 17:12; grants, 24:12 
Garland, Judy, 3 :7 
“Gunsmoke”, 4 :7 

“Harvest of Shame”, 4 :7, 5 :6, 6 :13, 7 :14, 8 :14, 
13 :4, 14 : 1 7 
IATSE walkout, 15:8 
“Malibu Run”, 14:8 
medical-care documentary, 9:11 
“Million Dollar Incident", 17:13 
Moore. Garry, 19:11 
newsfilm by wire, 20:5 
o&o's, 11 :1 1, 24:12 

participations, 3 :6, 5 :12. 7 :3, 21 :10, 23 :7 
“Perry Mason”. 6:10, 21:14, 23:14 
“Playhouse 90”, 21 :4 
plugola, 12 :6 

“The Power and the Glory”, 20:16 
Production Sales unit, 4:11 
programming 

pre-emptions, 7 :10 
public-affairs, 14 :6, 24 :9 
schedule, 8 :14, 11 :2, 14 :6>, 15 :7. 21 :10, 23 :7 
ratings, 23 :6 
review, year-end, 3 :5 
“Spy Next Door”, 6:6, 10:8 
standards converter, 21 :12 
Stanton, Frank Dr.. 22:3. 24:12 
station break, 24 :1 
studio consolidation, 2:13 
Sullivan, Ed, 4 :7, 8 :3, 11 :5, 12 :7, 24 :14 
Television City, 20:14. 21:13 
Thomas, Danny, 13 :10 
||The Twentieth Century”, 2:10, 11 :1S 
“Washington Conversation”, 8:9 
“Way Out”, 15 :6 
“Witness’, 3 :15 

COMMUNITY ANTENNA SYSTEMS 

closed-circuit, 26 :9 

FCC legislation, 3:4, 8:10, 9:4, 15:4. 16:10, 19:17 
forecast, 1 :6 

H&B American, 24:7, 25:22 
Jerrold Electronics Corp., 2 :9. 4 :5, 24 :7 
microwave grants, 2 :9, 4 :5, 13 :17, 15 :4, 22 :11 
Montreal, 24 :7 

NCTA, 12 :12, 24 :7, 25 :6. 26 :2&9 
Rediffusion-Superior TV Ltd., 4 :5 
RTES Workshop, 4:4 

sales, 4:5, 7:24, 10:8, 13:17, 16:10. 17:7*24, 
24:7, 25:22 

Systems Management Inc., 4 :5 
uhf field, entry into, 19:9 

CONGRESS 
forecast, 1:3 

House Commerce Comm., 2:4, 4:11, 7:14, 8:9, 
9:11, 14:16 

House Commerce Legislative Oversight Subcom- 
mittee, 1:10, 2:2 

House Communications & Power Subcomm. 11 :12 
House TV & radio coverage, 2:3, 8:9, 9:11 
legislation 

bcstg. interests of congressmen, 11:12 
Budget, Joint Committee on, 5:9 
communications probe, 5 :8 
Congressmen’s finances, 17 :16 
crime, 6 :13 
defamation, 8 :9 
gambling, 21 :7 

network regulation, 2 :2, 8 :9, 20 :12 
sabotage, 23 :3, 26 :14 
subversive activities, 13 :16 
regulatory agencies 

Administrative Conf. of the U.S., 3:5, 16:5, 
19:15, 20:13, 22 :12, 26:13 
ethics. 5:4, 6:13, 9:11, 18:2, 19:15, 20:12, 23:4, 
24:13 

FCC reorganization plan, 23:2, 24:3, 26:4 
Landis Report, 1:1, 2:2, 3:3*18. 5:4&7, 6:4, 
7:7, 8:14, 10:14, 13:6, 14:16, 15:1, 16:1, 17:6 
legislation, 2:3, 5:8, 7:14, 13:15 
records, public access, 16 :6 
Regulatory Agencies Subcommittee, 10:9 
reorganization, Kennedy plan, 16:1, 17:16, 

18:2, 19:3, 20:12, 21:1, 22:1, 23:2, 25:3 
White House control, 12:4, 13:15, 14:16 
Senate Commerce Committee, 2:2, 3:16, 7:7, 8:9 
14:17, 19:17 

Senate Commerce Freedom of Communications 
Subcommittee, 2:4, 4:11, 6:8, 6:2&13, 10:11, 
11:12, 12:4, 13:15, 14:4 

Senate Judiciary Administrative Practice & 
Procedure Subcomm., 14:16 
Senate Judiciary Antitrust & Monopoly Sub- 
comm., 14:16, 16:13 

Senate Juvenile Delinquency Subcomm., 23:3 
24:2, 25:7, 26:3 

EDUCATIONAL TV 

Albany. N.Y. ETV, 13:14 

Assn, of Professional Bcstg. Ed., 17 :8, 20:10 

Cal. recommendations, 10:10 

courses, 15:11, 20:18 

Defense Education Act of 1958. 18:7 

Fla. Ed. Assn, convention, 15:11 

Ford Foundation survey, 17 :24 

forecast, 1 :6 

grants : Ford. 2 :12, 3 :15. 11 :7, 17 :24 : govt. 10 :10 
Inst, for Ed. by Radio-TV, 15:11. 18:10 
Joint Council on Ed. Bcstg., 7 :24 



JefTerson Standard Bcstg. scholarship, 22:14 
Kennedy news-conf. films, 2:12 
Learning Resources Institute, 19 :8 
legislation, 2:3, 3:15, 4:10, 6:14, 9:10 10-9 

11:7, 12:3, 13:2, 14:17, 15:5, 19:17, 20:8, 21:8’ 
22:11,25:22 

Maine, WPTT Augusta CP, 10:10 
Milwaukee uhf-vhf operation, 7 :24 
MPATI, 6:14, 13:14, 17:24, 19:9, 21:8 
National Assn, of Ed. Bcstrs.. 17-24 
NET, 20:18, 22:10 

N.Y. & L.A. vhfs, 14:2 18:6, 19:15. 22,12 23-7 

N.Y. uhf CPs. 11 :7 

Pa. statewide network, 2 :12 

patronage trends, 10:10, 13:14 

teacher-training course, 10:10 

Texas closed-circuit system, 7 :24 

Washington ETV, 11:7 

Wilmington Ch. 12, 15:11 

ELECTRONIC INDUSTRIES ASSN. (EIA) 

Board meeting, 12:13&15, 13:21 

convention, 37th annual, 21:20. 22:15&16 

eiectronic-equip., industrial sales statistics, 5:18 

Japanese embargo petition, 23 :17 

Medal of Honor, 1961, 12:15, 22:19 

microwave service, 15:13 

‘Plus Values’, 2:17 

Renegotiation Act of 1951, 7 :20 

Spring conf., 7:21, 12:13*15 

ELECTRONICS INDUSTRY 
Commerce Dept, predictions, 5:16 
components: minimum wage, 21:19; prod.. 7:21 
employment picture, 7:19 
’Financial World’ profiles, 2:19 
industrial electronics plant needs, 9:18 
Japanese threat, 4:17 
sales volume prediction, 12:16 
"small business” definition, 5 :18 

ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS 
consumer, new, 10:18 
highway, 26 :18 

industrial eiectronic-equip. sales, 5:18 
molecular electronics, 26:15 

EQUIPMENT, TELECASTING 
Cameras 

GE’s low-light orthicon tube, 22 :6 
NAB convention, 20 :4 

Towers 

FAA proposals, 25:8 

legislation, unused, 5:4, 6:13, 7:14, 19:17, 21:7 
lighting demonstration by WMTV Madison, 7 :4 
Miscellaneous 

automatic logging apparatus, 3 :5 
automation systems, 20 :4 
bi-directional TV distribution system. 1:11 
sound film system, 10:15 

Triangle buys into ITA Electronics. 22 :6, 24 :5 
trip-cue cartridge tape recorder, 1:9 
TV monitors, 10:16 
TV projection systems, 13:17 

FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 
(FCC) 

ail-channel sets, 5:1, 6:1, 12:13, 13:6, 16:4, 24:5, 
26:14 

Bartley, Comr., 12 :4 
Boston Ch. 5. case, 5 :3. 20 :13, 22 :12 
budget, 4:10, 10:9, 13:6, 23:4, 24:13 
fines for violations, 19:17, 24:13, 26:14 
Ford. Comr., 7:7, 16:3, 17:6, 18:6 
forecast, 1 :3 

Indianapolis Ch. 13 case, 25 :8 
Jacksonville Ch. 12 case, 16 :5 
Lee, Comr., 1:9, 11:7, 15:5 

license renewal, 1:8, 2:6, 4:10. 5:4, 8:14*15 
12:1, 13:6, 14:1*12, 16:4, 18:6, 19:15, 20:11, 
22 :12, 23 :5, 24:4&5 
licensees fee system, 5 :14, 21 :9 
Miami Ch. 7 case, 11 :7, 12 :1 
Miami Ch. 10 case, 1 :8, 13 :5, 21 :16 
Minow, Newton N. Chmn., 3:1, 4:10, 6:1, 7:2, 
8:2, 9:10, 10:2, 11 :1&7. 17:16, 20:1.7*8, 

21:2,4*5, 22:2,4.11*12, 23:8*9, 24:4, 25:1*8, 
26 :3&14 

NAB convention panel, 20:9 

network hearing, 13:4, 21:9, 22:12, 23:5, 25:9, 
26:5 

“network” definition sought, 24:12 
Orlando Ch. 9 case, 9:10 
payola. 8:14. 18:3, 22:12, 24:5, 26:14 
plugola, 20 :13, 25 :9 

procedures, 2:6, 7:14, 8:9, 11:7, 12:4, 13:16. 

18:2*7, 19:17, 25:8, 26:14 
“public interest” definitions, 2 :5 
receiver radiation, 23 :17, 24 :4 
reorganization: Kennedy plan, 18:2, 19:3, 20:12, 
21:1, 22:1. 25:3; FCC’s plan. 23:2, 24:3, 26:4 
review. 1960, 1:8 
rules & regulations 
automatic logging, 3 :5 
Form 324, 6:3 
multiple ownership, 23 :3 
option time, 17:3, 19:2, 21:9 
program-form, 3:4, 8:1, 9:2, 10:11, 13:6, 15:5 
17:3, 18:6, 19:16, 20:13, 23:5 
spot- rep decision, 10:2 



2 



station applications, 2:6, 3:6, 6:13, 20:13 
station sales, 3:6, 4:1, 5:4 
tower evaluation, 2:6, 3:16, 5:4 
violations, 6:13, 13:1 
St. Louis Ch. 2 case, 8:15 

Senate Appropriations Subcomm. hearing 25 :2 
Spartanburg, S.C. case, 1 :9 
Tampa-St. Petersburg Ch. 10 case. 6:13 
TV film hearings, 5:4, 7:8, 11:3, 12:5, 13:4 

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION (FTC) 
budget, 4:10 

Dixon, Paul Rand Chmn., 7:3, 11:12, 12:2, 13:8, 
15 :14, 16:13, 17:4, 19:4*10, 20:15, 23:10 
Elman, Philip, 16:13, 17:9 

false advertising, 2:8, 3:17&18, 5:7, 10:14&15, 
12:8, 13:9, 15:1*5, 17:9, 18:11, 19:10, 20:15, 
21 :1 1 & 12, 22:9, 23:10, 25:10, 26:11 
forecast, 1 :3 
Kern, W.C., 3:18 

Kintner, Earl W„ 2 :8, 3 :17, 5 :7, 7 :3 
MacIntyre, A.E., 19:10 

payola, 13:14, 14:15, 15:12, 16:8, 17:7, 26:10 

FILM 

Ding Crosby Productions, 2:11 
blacklisting suit, 1:13, 8:13, 12:9 
blockbooking, 5:5, 7:15, 17:12 
business conditions, 12:9 
Cal. National Productions, 22:8, 23:6 
Carousel Films, 2:11 
cartoons, animated, 1:12 
CBS Films. 20:17, 24:10 
Communists, employment of, 4 :8 
costs, 7 :13 

Desilu, 7:12, 8:13, 10:3, 11:9*11, 13:10, 18:12, 
19 :13, 21 :14, 24 :10 
exports, 5 :10, 22 :2, 24 :10, 25 :14&15 
FCC hearings, 5 :4, 7 :8, 11 :3, 12:5, 13 :4, 21 :9 
Film Producers Assn, of N.Y., 1:12 
forecast, 1:6 

Four Star TV, 6 :9, 10 :4. 19 :12, 21 :14 
import legislation, 22:11 
Intercontinental TV Inc., 4 :8 
ITC, 11:8 

Japanese import policy, 16:2 
MfiM-TV, 6:8, 13:10, 17:14, 19:12, 20:17, 25:15 
Minow, executives reaction to. 20:6, 21 :4 
museum, movie & TV, 1:12, 11:8, 12:10, 16:12 
network sales boxscore, 13:10 
NTA, 7:12, 8:13, 10:3, 11:8, 14:9, 15:9, 18:12, 
21 :13, 24 : 1 0& 1 1 
NT&T, 14 :9, 16 :12. 17 :15, 24 :8 
Official Films, 13:13, 20:17 
Paramount, 14:8, 15:9 

Pilots: Also see N.Y. & Hollywood Roundups: 
1:11, 3:3, 6:8, 9:6, 13:10, 16:12 
production: network, 26:12; producers, 9:7; 

small cos., 9:6, 25:13; volume, 20:17 
Revue Studios, 9:6, 18:12, 25:13 
RKO General suit, 11:8, 12:10 
Screen Gems, 16:12, 23:14 
selling a series, 18:11 
series sales, 8:12, 18:12, 19:13 
Seven Arts Productions, 14:10 
N syndication, 1:6, 9:7, 17:15, 19:3*12, 21:13, 
22:7*8, 23:14, 25:13 
; Transfilm-Caravel, 1 : 12, 7 :13 

20th Century-Fox, 2:19, 6:8, 7:12, 11:8, 19:13. 

24 : 1 1 , 25 : 14, 26 :12 
veteran personalities, 22 :7 

Warner Bros., 1:13, 3:8, 6:7, 9:8, 14:9, 17:14 
24 :10 

Ziv-UA, 15:10 
Backlogs to TV 

buying analysis, 22 :6 
forecast, 1:6 

NAB screening, 20:5, 24:11 

post-’48 sales. 2:11, 14:10, 15:9*11, 18:12, 20:17 

Film Producers and Distributors Financial 
Reports 

ABC Films, 25:14 
Allied Artists, 8:20, 22 :22 
Capital Film Labs, 25:24 
i. Columbia Pictures, 4 :20, 14 :23, 24 :20 
CBS Films. 2:11, 24:10 
Desilu, 6:19, 9 :20, 22 :22, 26 :19 
Filmways, 9:19 

Four Star TV, 9 :20, 20 :24, 21 :24 
Guild Films, 8:19, 10:23, 13:11 
MGM, 3:24, 4:19, 9:20, 12:20. 16:20 
Movielab Film Labs, 16:20, 25:24 
MPO Videotronics, 7:23, 10:21 
NTA, 8:20, 12:18, 15:20 
Official Films, 9:20 

Paramount, 7 :22, 12,18, 14 :21, 18 :18, 19 :24, 24 :20 
Republic, 7:23, 9:16, 15:20, 24:20 
Screen Gems, 2 :20, 7 :24. 8 :19, 14 :23, 15 :20, 23 :20 
„ Seven Arts, 24:11 

Stanley Warner, 3 :24, 15 :20 
Sterling TV, 7 :23, 25 :20 
Television Industries, 21:24, 23:14 
Trans-Lux, 16:20, 21:24 
Twentieth Century-Fox, 19:24, 21 :13 
United Artists, 9:19, 17:23, 25:24 
Universal Pictures, 6:20, 13:24, 26:20 
UPA Pictures Inc., 23:14 

Walt Disney Prod., 3:24, 7:23, 18:18*20, 21 :23 
Warner Bros., 6:20, 13:23, 16:19, 23:20, 24:20 



FINANCIAL ACTIVITY, GENERAL 
Manufacturing 

electronics profit roundup, 12:14 
small-business investment cos., other, 9:19, 11:18, 
17:22, 24:20 

Avionics Investing, 9:19 

Axe Science & Electronics, 12:19 

Electronics Capital, 3 :23, 7 :24, 17 :22, 22 :21, 25 :23 

Electronics Investment, 10:23, 23:19 

TV-Electronics Fund, 9 :19, 22 :21 

TV Shares Management, 23 :20 

Telecasting (See also Advertising) 
forecast, 1 :4 

Capital Cities Bcstg., 8 :20, 25 :24 

Crowell-Collier Pub., 12:18 

Famous Players Canadian, 12 :20, 25 :24 

Goodwill Stations Inc., 12:20, 19:14 

Gross Telecasting, 15:20 

Meredith Publishing, 6:19, 7:23, 8:20, 19:24 

MetroMedia, 10:22, 14:24, 20:24, 26:10 

NAFI Corp., 4:6, 11:20, 19:24 

NT&T, 7 :23, 11 :20, 21 :24, 26 :20 

Reeves Bcstg. & Development, 14:23, 26:19 

RKO General, 14 :24, 17 :7 

Rollins Bcstg., 10:22 

Storer Bcstg., 1:20, 3:24, 8:20, 12:20, 16:9, 17:23 
Taft Bcstg., 5:20, 20:24, 23:19, 24:20 
Tele-Broadcasters, 20 :22, 23 :20 
Time, 14 :23 

Times-Mirror, 14:23, 22:22 
Transcontinent TV, 24 :19, 25:24 
Wometco, 2 :20, 12 :20, 16 :19, 19 :24, 21 :21 

FOREIGN TRADE 

American Radio Importers Assn., 13:22, 19:22 
exports: U.S. figures, 2:16, 5:17, 7:18, 11:17; 

violations, 10 :21 
forecast. 1 :17 
imports 

British, 3:23, 9:18 
Canadian, 26 : 1 9 
EIA, 12 : 1 3, 22 :20 
German, 3:23, 13:20 

IBEW boycott, 4:17, 5:15, 9:17, 11:18, 12:13 
16:18, 17:20 

International Home Furnishings Market. 3 :2I 
Italian, 19:22 

Japanese, 2:16*17, 3:23, 4:16, 5:17, 6:15 
9:17, 10:20, 11:18, 12:13, 13:22. 14 :19*20, 
16:16*18, 23:17, 26:17 
U.S. figures, 2:16, 5:17, 6:15, 11:17 
Japanese securities. 4:19 
legislation, 2 :3, 19:17 
Philco’s overseas operations, 4:14, 10:23 
pricing Senate probe, 6:18 

FOREIGN TV 
CBS roundup, 13:17 
international allocations agreement, 7:8 
international TV, 10:7 
Intertel, 17:16, 23:9, 24:9, 25:15 
investment forecast, 1:7 
Latin-American network, 19:18 
standards converters, 21 : 12 
world TV set count, 17 :5 

References to specific countries 

Africa, 6:14, 23:6 
Argentina, 19 :18, 20 :17, 24 : 1 0 
Australia, 5:6, 14:20, 20:17, 22 :8, 24:8 
Brazil, 20:17, 21 :14, 22:3, 24:10, 26:12 
Cuba, 1 :10, 2 :10, 12 :5, 17 :8&13, 22 :6 
Denmark, 5 :5 
Ecuador, 22 :24 
Formosa, 5 :9 

France, 7 :8, 8 :5, 11 :9, 12 :5, 14 :24 

Germany, 5:5, 8:5, 10:12, 12:5 

Holland, 5 :5 

India. 22 :20 

Ireland, 24 :8 

Israel, 9:18 

Italy, 5 :5& 12, 8 :5, 22 :8 

Japan, 4:5*11, 5:9, 7:8, 9:17, 16:2, 17:21, 21:13, 
25 :15 

Laos, 21:10 

Latin America, 12:6, 19:18 
Malaya, 20 : 14 
Mexico. 23 :7 
Nicaragua, 2 :18 
Peru, 22 :20 
Philippines, 5:5, 22:10 
Puerto Rico, 22 :6 

Russia, 5:6, 12:10, 16:11, 17:16, 25:21 

Sudan, 17 :24 

Sweden, 4 :5, 15 :4 

Uruguay, 22 :20 

Virgin Islands, 19:14 

Yugoslavia, 8 :5 

Britain 

Associated-Rediffusion, 10 :4 

BBC, guide to, 22 :23 

bookselling on TV, 17 :10 

British Space Development Co. Ltd., 6 :7 

eclipse, sun, 8 :5 

E.M.I. Ltd.. 7 :22, 11:19 

English Electric, 22 :21 

license fee, 24 :8 



reading instrument, electronic, 10:21 
Thorn Electrical Ind., 23:18 
TV ad tax, 18:11 
TV writers' school, 15:4 
Visnews, 6 :8 

Canada 

Board of Broadcast Governors 
beer & ale rules, 4 :3 

CBC disaffiliation sought. 22:13, 25:15, 26:7 
CATV, 10:8, 13:17, 16:10 
fines, 13:14 

pay TV, 10:8, 13:17, 16:10 
satellite applications, 7:6, 11:11, 14:15, 24:5 
CBC 

budget, 21 :10, 24:12 
directors Quebec meeting, 5:12 
“General Motors Presents”, 22 :5 
microwave systems, new, 10:13 
NABET pact, 17 :11 

news-service employes wage dispute, 9:5 
Charge-a-Vision, 4:5 
ETV, 5:12, 24:13 
imports, 17 :21 
licensee fees, 19 : 15 
Montreal TV & FM tower, 13 :13 
National Community Antenna TV Assn., 8:10 
private TV network, 13:12, 16:8, 17:11 
Telemeter’s Toronto pay-TV operation, 2:9, 4:4, 
10:3, 13:16, 15:4, 22:11 
TV-radio code, 7 :6 

TV-radio program content, 8:6, 12:11 
TV set census, 4:6 

TV sales to dealers, 5:18, 7:16, 8:17, 11:18 
17 :21, 21 :20, 25 :19 

FREQUENCY MODULATION (FM) 
educational multiplexing, 5:12 
EIA production figures, 2:16, 7:16, 12:16, 15:17 
20:21, 25:19 
forecast, 1:16 
NAB survey, 15:12 
plane radio ban, 20 :22 
radio sales, 2:15 
station totals, 4 :2 

INDUSTRIAL TV 

ITT slow-scan system, 13:17 
Tel-Eye system, 21 :21 
3-D system, 17:21 
traffic control, N.Y., 17 :24 
underwater TV, 21 :5 

INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGINEERS (IRE) 
convention, 4:13 
JUSTICE DEPARTMENT 
forecast, 1:5 
Loevinger, Lee, 8:15 

LABOR 

automation, 6:18, 16:6 
electronics ind. employment picture, 7 :19 
overtime, small-market stations, 4:11, 11:12, 

16:6, 17:8, 19:17 

salaries: engineers, 7:19; media buyers, 24 :7 
station labor relations, federal regulation, 9:9 

MARKET & AUDIENCE RESEARCH 
ARB: C-E-I-R merger. 22 :6, 23:9; TV house- 
holds, 26 :1 

Milwaukee viewers survey, 21 :5 
Nielsen 

AA ratings, 14 :5, 23 :6 
audience competition, 14 :3 

Automated Preference Testing purchase, 14 :24 
casualty rate, 5:5 
casualties’ ratings, 5 :5 
daytime audience interests, 8 :6 
financial reports, 2 :20, 14 :23, 15 :20 
late fringe-time audience, 8 :6 
MNA ratings, 26:6 
network viewing decline, 17 :7 
NMS, 26:11 
NTI reports, 1:14 
public-service programs, 11:8 
reruns analysis, 13:14 
‘Television ’61’, 21 :3 
viewing figures, 4:7, 10:2, 14:4, 19:7 
Pulse: editorials, 22:4; viewing by category, 5:5 
rating services: criticism, 6:5, 12:8, 13:3, 18:14, 
19:6, 26:4 
Rorabaugh, 26:11 

Schwerin Research Corp. TV survey, 10:16 
Sponsor: casualty rates, 11:5 
TvAR: pet owners viewing, 12:8 
TvQ: age group program preferences, 3:15 

MEDICAL USE OF TV 

Council on Med. TV, 2 :12, 8 :10, 16 :7, 17 :24, 20 : 13 
scrambled ETV, 14:12, 23:5, 24:8 
Walter Reed Med. TV Center, 1:11, 2:9, 5:9 
6:11, 17:24 

MERCHANDISING, TV RECEIVER & APPLI- 
ANCES (See also Color) 
business failures, 23:18 

calendar TV-radio-phono showings, 13 :20, 14 :21 
consumer buying plans surveys, 8:17, 14:20 
Electronics Leasing Corp., 5:18 



3 



MERCHANDISING— (Continued) 

FTC complaints: false claims, 1:19, 2:17, 15:19, 
22:21; tube labeling, 5:17, 7:20, 10:19&21, 
13:20, 14:19, 17:21, 26:18 
forecast, 1 : 16 

industry leaders forecast, 1:17 

Internat. Home Furnishings Market, 2:14, 3:19 

junkets, retailers, 23:18 

legislation 

model year tag, 5:18 
NAKUA Chicago convention, 4:16 
product misbranding, 2:3 
prices: trends, 2 :14, 3:20, 23:16 
Ravenswood, 26 :18 
sales 

appliances, factory sales prediction, 1 : 1 9 
EIA figures, retail, 2:16, 7:16, 12:16, 15:17, 
20:21, 25:19 
forecast, 1:16 
low-end market, 26:17 
predictions for 1961, 4:16, 7:17 
summary, 23 :16 
upswing, 21 :17, 22 :15, 25 :15 
scrapping, TV sets, 18:15 
3-screen TV, 9:18, 11:18 
uhf-equipped sets, 8:16 
warranties, 1 :15, 3:20, 18:16, 21 :21 
Wells TV, 2:19 
Woolworth, 16 :16, 21 :21 

MILITARY USE OF TV 

aircraft carrier closed-circuit hookup, 6:11 
Army’s Medical TV unit, 1:11, 2:9, 5:9, 6:11 
Pentagon, closed-circuit eolor-TV, 4 :5, 15 :4 

MOBILIZATION 

Civil Defense, 9:12 

Conelrad, 11:11, 16:8, 18:6, 19:16 

OCDM, 5 :13, 6:14, 22 :12, 24:13 

MUSIC AGENCIES 
ASCAP, 10:24, 14:5, 20:11 
BMI, 25:2 
MCA, 13:24, 18:18 

NATIONAL ASSN. OF BROADCASTERS (NAB) 

automatic logging, 3 :5 
Board meetings, 6:12, 7:1 

Collins, LeRoy Pres., 3:3, 5:13, 6.12. 7.1, 9.13, 
10-6*8 11:10, 12 :2&9, 13:14, 15:2*13, 17.4, 

18:14, 19:14, 20:1,7*10, 22:2, 26 :3&10 

convention, 39th, 7:6, 11:11, 14:15, 15:12, 16:8, 
17 :8, 18 :7&8, 19 :1&12, 20 :p 1 et seq. 
engineering achievement award, t :16, 20.9 
Engineering Advisory Committee, 10:15 
executive development seminar, 25:12 
forecast, 1:4 
Hartenbower, E. K., 19:4 
Holland House, 10:15 .... 

House complaints liaison, 14 :1(> 
labor subcommittee, 13:14 
McCollough, Clair R. Chmm., 1 :9, 7 :5 
membership, 19:4, 25:11 
movie censorship for TV, 20:5, 24 :11 
publications directory, 23 :3 
Radio Board, 15:12, 25:11 
Radio Code, 25 :4 

Radio Code Review Board, 3 :16, 7 :11, 23 :11 

reorganization, 23:13, 25:5 

review, 1960, 1 :9 

Richards, Robert K., 11:10 

state bcstrs. assns. pres. Conf., 5.14, 8.8, a .» 

TIO, 7:15, 14:15, 20:10, 24:14 

toy industry 10:14, 23:10 

TV Board, 20:10 

TV Code, 10:15, 25:4, 26:3 

TV Code Review Board 7 :11, 14 :13, 26 

TV Information Committee, 25:11 

Voice of Democracy contest, 2:6, 8:3, 9:9 

Wesson Oil. 10:15 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY (NBC) 

affiliates, 7 :10, 19 :1, 20 :10. 21 :13, 26 :5 

Brinkley, David, 5:13, 11:5, 26:5 

“Carnival Time”, 19:9 

“Continental Classroom”, 19 :8 

“Dr. Kildare”, 15:14 

Eastman Kodak billings, 10:5 

foreign interests, 7 :8, 19:18, 23:7 

Hope, Bob, 15:7, 21:7, 22:14 

Horton, Robert, 22 :9 

Huntley, Chet, 11:5 

"The Kuklapolitans”. 21 :15 

“The Lawless Years”, 22 :9 

L.A. hq. purchase, 11:9 

“Meet the Press”, 5:12 

Moscow May Day coverage, 20 :14 

NBC News, 12:6, 19:6, 23:6, 25:15 

newsfilm, wire-syndicated, 6:7, 20:5 

“The Outlaws”, 18:13 

Paar, Jack, 11:5, 12:7, 26:12 

Partieipating-Programs Unit, 15:8 

personnel cutbacks, 7:10, 14:14. 16:8 

phila. Ch. 3, Philco protest, 14:2, 15:5, 16 :a 

“Piracy in the Caribbean”, 5:6 

programming 

color, 10:5, 19:6, 21:15, 25:18 
most popular shows poll, 12 :7 
movie specials, 8:4, 9:6, 19:8 
public service, 17 :12, 18 : 1 0 
schedule, 9:5, 11:2, 14:6, 15:7 



“Project 20”, 18:10 
Purex women’s specials, 21 :15 
review, year-end, 3 :5, 6 :12 
Sarnoff, R. W. Chmn., 6:4 
Shore, Dinah, 8 :6 
“Some Like It Hot”, 14 :8 
station break, 24:1 

“station-swap” plans, 2:13, 8:14, 17:4, 18:6 

trademark, 10 :6 

‘TV & Modern Mktg.’. 14 :3 

“The U-2 Affair”, 4 :11 

“Wagon Train’’, 8:12 

“Wells Fargo”, 9:7, 21 :15 

“Whispering Smith”, 22:11 

NETWORKING FACILITIES 

duct transmission, 4 :13 
microwave predictions, 2:18 
optical maser, 6 :7 
relay hop, longest, 22 :6 



NEW STATIONS ON AIR 

forecast, 1 :5 

Beaumont, Tex., KBMT, 25:12 
Douglas, Ariz., KCDA, 10:12 
El Paso, Tex., XEPM-TV, 12:11 
Hot Springs, Ark., KFOY-TV, 6:12 
Idaho Falls, Ida., KIFI-TV, 4:6 
Kansas City, Mo., KCSD-TV, 13:13 
Phoenix, Ariz., KAET, 5:14 
Portland, Ore., KOAP-TV, 5:14 
Puerto Rico 

Mayaguez, WIPM-TV, 12:11 
Canada 

Banff, Alta., CHCB-TV, 13:13 
Fox River, Que., CHSM-TV, 8 :8 
Halifax, N.S., CJCH-TV, 3:17 
Harrison Brook, Que., CKCD-TV, 15:13 
Keremeos, B.C., CHBC-TV-6, 9:9 
Lumby, B.C., CHBC-TV-5, 6:12 
Montreal, Que., CFCF-TV, 4:6: CFTM-TV, 7:5 
Ottawa, Ont., CJOH-TV, 11:10 
Pivot, Alta., CHAT-TV-1, 23:12 
Salmon Arm, B.C.. CHBC-TV-4, 25:12 
Sturgeon Falls, Ont., CBFST, 11 : 1 0 
Toronto, Ont., CFTO-TV, 1:10 
Stations off Air 

Cadillac, Mich., WWTV (temp.), 5:14, 7:4 
Pocatello, Ida., KTI.E, 4:6, 5:14 

NEWSPAPERS 

ad content, 13 :9 
AP membership, 14:6 
circulation, 12:8, 20:15 
discounts, 8:11 
Goodson-Todman, 25 :12 
TV ownership, 19:15 

PATENTS (See also Antitrust) 

Senate hearings, 15:19, 17 : 1 7 
PAY TV 

admen’s views, 17 :24 
Charge-a-Vision, 4:5 
criticism, 15:3 
forecast, 1 :7 
H&B American, 26 :9 
legislation, 2 :3, 5 :9 
NCTA convention, 26:2 
NTA, 14:9, 15:3, 22:11 
protests, 2 :9, 4 :5, 7 :24, 10 :7, 13 :6 
Teleglobe Pay-TV System Inc., 16:9, 23:9 
Telemeter: (see also Canada) ; 5:3, 10:3, 14:12, 
22 :11, 26 :9 

TelePi ompTer’s Key TV system, 5 :3, 26 :9 
West Coast group, 26:9 

Zenith-RKO Hartford test, 1:10, 4:2, 9:1, 14:12, 
19:4 

PHONOGRAPHS 

EIA figures, 1:18, 4:18, 8:16, 14:22, 16:18, 

21:22, 25:19 
forecast, 1 :16 

Institute of Hi-Fi Mfrs., 16:18 
Westrex groove tape system, 13:21 



POLITICS 



Daly, Lar, 12:6 

equal-time, 2:4, 5:8, 6:2, 8:9, 9:11, 10:11, 

11 :4&12, 12 :4, 13 : 1 5 . 14 :4&12. 15 :6, 23:7 
“Ev & Charlie Show”, 13:15, 16:11 
legislation : govt, funds for Presidential cam- 
paigns, 3:16, 6:13, 13:15, 16:6, 20:12 



newsmen’s bias, 16:11 

Nixon-Kennedy debates, 3:14, 6:6, 17:12*17 
PR Dept, recommended, 13:16 
Pres. Kennedy, admen rate, 21 :12 
Republican Presidential campaign, 4:11 
Section 315, 2:3, 5:8, 6:2, 10:11, 11:13, 
24:13,25 :7 , „ 

‘Survey of Political Bcstg.’, FOC study, 16:6 



22:3, 



PRODUCTION, TV-RADIO-PHONO 

EIA figures, 2:16, 3:19, 7:16. 12:16, 15:17, 
20:21, 25:19 
flat-screen TV, 13 :19 
forecast, 1:16 

Hoffman quits TV, 7 :20, 14 : 18 
innovations, 1:15, 2:14 
Japanese, 4 :17 

plant vacation shutdowns. 26:17 



remote control, 3 :23 
17-in. revival, 10:18 
technological advances, 13:5 

TelePrompTer’s communication-wall system, 4 :16 
transistor TV, 10:18 
uhf-equipped sets, 8:16 

PROGRAMS & PRODUCTION (See also individ- 
ual networks) 

broadcasters briefings, 15:13 
Canon 35, 17 :13 
cartoons, 21 :15 

casualties, 3:15, 4:8, 5:5, 8:12, 11:5, 12:9, 

17:14, 20:16, 21 :15, 26:8 

censorship, 5:5, 8:5, 9:12, 10:16, 13:12, 20:5, 
23:8 

children’s news shows, 22:4 
Civil War series, 14 :8, 21 : 1 3 
clergymen’s favorites, 24 :9 
Congressional hearings, 19:8 
cost survey, 2 :10 
court coverage, 23 :8 

criticism, 3:15, 6:13. 7:15, 8:5&9, 9:11, 13:12* 

13, 14:16, 20:16, 21 :7, 22:5&10. 24 :9 
eclipse, sun, 8:5 

editorials. 8:6, 10:7, 12:7, 22:4, 25:11, 26:8 
Eichmann trial, 8:5, 12:11, 18:9 
Festivals : Monaco, 5 :6 ; Montreux, 5 :6, 8 :7, 

13:7, 20:14, 23:8 
forecast, 1 :4&5 
freedom of access, 11 :4 
govt, control, 17:16 
immunity for reporters, 19:9, 24:9 
Inauguration, 2 :8, 4 :7, 5 :5 
judges on TV, 22:4 

jury deliberation re-enactment show, 13:13, 14:8, 
15:6, 18:10, 19:8 

legislatures coverage, 3:14&15, 8:6, 11 :13, 23:12 
live TV, 19 :9, 22 :13 

man-in-space shot, 8:5, 14:8, 18:9, 19:7, 20:9* 

14, 21 :10 

network, fourth, 26 :5 

network nighttime fall schedules, 11:2, 14:6, 

15:7, 17:13, 19:7, 24:9 
new shows ratings, 14:5, 15:7 
newscasts, 9:12 
newsfilm by wire, 20 :5 
plagiarism case, 5:11 

“Play of the Week”. 2:10, 6:6, 8:5, 25:13 
“PM East & PM West”, 15:6, 17 :15, 23:9. 26:12 
predictions, producers. 23:3 
"public interest” definitions, 2:5 
public service 

Collins, LeRoy, NAB Pres., 12:2 
cost, 17 :11 

Intertel, 17:16, 23:9, 24 :9, 25:15 
local, 1:9, 2:10, 5:10, 7:6, 8:9, 9:8, 16:2, 
17:13, 18:9, 19:9, 23:8, 24:5*8, 26:8 
network, 13:3, 17:11, 25:12 
rates, 2:10 

Westinghouse Pittsburgh Conf., 16:2&13, 17 :8 
Wolper, David, 17 :12 
quiz shows, 13:12, 24:14, 25 :13 
Russian spaceman, 16:11, 17:16 
60-min. shows, 3:8, 6:8, 19:13 
slander conspiracy case, 2:10, 6:7 
specials, 7:15, 13:12, 23 :9 
sponsor interference, 21:11 
Storer Best. Standards Dept. 14:15 
Susskind, David, 8 :5 
Truman series, 24 :9 
UN coverage, 8:4, 15:12 
Vienna & Paris coverage, 22:13 
violence, 4:7, 6:6, 11:13, 12:2, 13:15, 14:9, 15:10, 
17:14, 18:6, 20:16, 23:3, 24:2, 25:7, 26:3 
Wagner, Robert Mayor, 24:9 
Westerns, 23:4 

White House “fireside chats”, 11:4, 12:7 
White House news confs. coverage, 1:2, 3:15, 
5:2*6, 6:11, 7:4, 8:4*6, 12:7, 17:12, 18:9 

Awards 

Albert Lasker Medical Journalism. 19:18 

All-American ( ‘Radio Daily') , 9:12 

Communications & Public Interest Conf., 6 :7 

criticism, 5 :6 

Du Pont TV-radio, 13:18 

Edison Foundation mass media, 13:18 

Emmy. 7 :13, 12 :10, 21 :15. 22 :5, 25 :13 

Freedoms Foundation, 9:13 

George Polk Memorial, 13:18 

National Brotherhood. 9:13 

National Cartoonists Society, 18:13 

National Religious Publicity Council, 17 :13 

Ohio State, 11:13 

Oscar, 17:12 

Peabody, 17:13 

RTES Gold Medal, 10:16 

‘Saturday Review’, 17 :13 

‘TV Guide’, 25:13 

PUBLICATIONS 

magazines, 8:11*12, 13:9, 17:9, 19:11, 20:15 
25 :9, 26:11 

‘Newsweek’ control, 11 :11 
Stauffer Publications Inc., 7 :6 
'Television Factbook’, 2 :2, 25 :6 

RECORDS, DISC 

Capitol Records, 1:18, 16:20 
Columbia Records, 20 : 20 
counterfeiting, 19:21 
Decea Records, 12:20, 18:19, 21:24 



4 



payola, 21 : 1 6 
Roulette Records, 22 :23 
sales, 23 : 19 

stereo compatibility, 25 :20 
■SALES, TV STATIONS 
ji Communications Capital Corp., 7 :6 
forecast, 1 :4 

Bellingham, Wash., KVOS-TV, 14:15 
Buffalo, N.Y., WKBW-TV, 1 :9, 22:5 
Butte. Mont., KXLF-TV, 4:1U 
Charleston, S.C., WCIV (CP), 5:13 
Dayton, O., WONE-TV (CP). 14:15. 24:5 
Enid-Oklahoma City, Okla.. KOCO-TV, 23:13 
Ft. Pierce, Fla.. WTVI, 22:6 
Fresno, Cal., KJEO, 10:13. 21:9 
Grand Island, Neb., KGIN-TV (CP), 7:8 
Green Bay, Wis., WFRV, 2:6 
Greenville, N.C., WNCT, 15:13 
Helena. Mont., KXLJ-TV, 4:10 
Huntington, W. Va., WSAZ-TV, 6:12, 14:15 
Kansas City, Mo., KMBC-TV, 6:12 
New Britain, Conn., WHNB-TV, 8:15, 26:10 
New York, N.Y.. WNTA-TV, 8:8. 9:8, 10:13, 
11:8, 13:14, 14:2*8, 17:7, 18:14, 19:15, 21:9 
Omaha, Neb., KMTV, 9:9 
Portsmouth, Va., WAVY-TV, 16:9 
Rochester, N.Y.. WROC-TV, 5:14. 7:5, 12:11 
Salisbury. Md„ WBOC-TV. 17 :7 
San Diego, Cal., KFSD-TV, 4:6 
Sedalia. Mo., KMOS-TV, 6:12 
Weston, W. Va., WJPB-TV, 24:5 
Yakima, Wash., KNDO, 6:12 
Youngstown, O., WKST-TV, 16:5 
Yuma, Ariz., K1VA, 6:12 
Canada 

Vancouver, B.C., CHAN-TV, 10 :13 
SECURITIES & EXCHANGE COMMISSION 
(SEC) 

officers & directors stock transaction, 4 :20, 7 :22, 
12:19,17:22, 20:23,25:23 
Skiatron Electronics & TV, 4:19, 18:19 
stock registraiton requests by firms not listed 
elsewhere, 2:19, 4:19, 7:22, 10:22&23, 14:23, 
15:20, 18:19, 22:21, 24:19 
violations, 18:20, 19:14, 23:13 

SEMICONDUCTORS 

molecular electronics, 26:15 
sales, forecast, 2:17 

transistors: EIA factory figures, 1:18, 6:16, 9:17, 
18:15, 21 :22, 26:17 

SOCIOLOGICAL EFFECTS 

I Campbell-Ewald’s study, 18:9 
[ children, 16:10 

SPACE COMMUNICATIONS 

allocations study, 2 :4 

AT&T, 5:6, 13:7, 14:24, 17:24, 21 :7, 25:2 
Congressional inquiry, 13:15, 18:7, 19:17. 21:7 
FCC hearings, 19 :16, 22:12, 23:7 
frequency allocation treaty, 21 :9 
GE, 18:6, 19:16, 23:7 
ITT, 4 :13 

interstellar TV. 13 :7 

NASA, 6:7&14, 21 :7 

ownership, private, 1:11. 10:15, 14:24 

RCA. 13:7, 21 :12 

rocket camera, 7 :24 

WBC, 16:5, 19:16 

| SPORTS (See also Subscription TV) 

“ABC’s World of Sports”, 15 :6 
baseball, 8 :6 
bowling, 24 : 14 

boxing, 1:11,5 :9, 6 :9, 11 :14, 14 :16, 23 :4 
football, 15:6, 17:11, 18:9, 19:6 
horse-racing, 5 :8 

legislation, 2:3, 5:8, 14:16, 20:12, 23:4 
wrestling, 19 :8 

STEREOPHONIC RADIO & TV 
FM 

applications, 22 :5 

EIA campaign, 21 :20, 22:16 

patents, 19 :19 

receivers & adapters, 17:18, 18:16, 19:20, 

20 :19, 21 :17, 22 :17. 23 :1, 25 :18 
standards, 1:15, 5:18, 7:18, 9:15, 14:19, 16:5, 
17:1, 19 :2&19, 25:21 
station equipment, 18:4, 20:3&19 
station poll, 19 :2 

stations on air, 23:1, 24:18, 25:1S&21, 26:16 
table models, 25:18 
Kahn AM system, 24 :5 

TAPE RECORDING, AUDIO 

cartridges, 1 :9, 18 :17, 21 :20 

Eastman Kodak, 8:17 

forecast, 1:17 

four channel, 17 :21 

Westrex groove tape system, 13:21 

TAPE RECORDINGS, VIDEO (See also Ampex 
| Corp. and RCA) 

NAB convention, 19:5, 20 :4&1 1 

National Video Tape Productions Inc., 1:12 

NBC TeleSales, 10:3 

Sony recorder, 13:7 

transistorized video-tape recorder, 6 :7 



VHF Inc., 23:14 
Videotape Center, 1:12 

Videotape Productions, 6:9, 11:9, 18:13, 23:14 
TAXES 
excise 

communications, 5:14, 6:11, 10:8 
ham radio receivers, 11:18 
TV-radio commercials, local, 3:17, 6:15 
TV-radio-phono rules, 1:18 
income, 9:11, 16:13, 23:14 
legislation, 2 :3 
sales, 7 :12 

TUBES, TV PICTURE (See also individual mfrs. 
and Color) 
color, 11:16, 13:19 

Internat. Home Furnishings Market, 2:14, 3:20 
RCA's dark heater, 10 :20 

sales: factory, EIA figures, 2:16, 7:19, 12:16, 

16 : 18, 21 :22, 25 :19 ; forecast, 2 :17 

shields. 2:14, 3:20, 5 :15, 7:20, 10:17, 11:18, 
13:22, 16:16, 25:17, 26:16 

UHF (Ultra High Frequency) (see also allocations) 

CP-holder FCC hearings, 12 :4 

FCC N.Y. project, 1:8, 10:11, 13:6, 14:11, 16:4, 

17 :6, 20 :10, 22 :12, 25 :20 
ownership by vhf in same city, 12 :5 
production & sales, 8:16 

shift to all-uhf, 1 :9 
tuner research, FCC, 15:16 

UNIONS & GUILDS 

AFL Film Council: runaway production, 3:8, 
7:13 

AFM : foreign recordings, 13:16; WWL-TV 

complaint, 18:6, 20:11 

AFTRA : Pension & Welfare Fund, 25:13: strike, 
KXTV Sacramento, 11:11, 18:14 
AGVA : “National Week”, 4:11, 5:9, 25:13, 26:14 



ADLER ELECTRONICS INC. 

1 :10, 8 :10, 9 :19, 10 :22, 18 :20, 19 :24, 23 :18 
ADMIRAL CORP. 

Canadian Admiral, 20 :24 

dealer convention, 7 :20 

financial reports, 14:23, 16:19. 20:22 

hotel equipment, 22 :21 

models, new, 12:15&16, 13:22, 19:22 

NARDA Chicago convention, 4:16 

1962 line, 21 :18, 22:19 

radios, 16 :19 

TV sets. 7 :20 

ALLIED RADIO, 12:20, 26:20 

AMERICAN BOSCH ARMA, 11:20, 14:21, 

18 :18&19 

AMERICAN ELECTRONIC LABS, 4 :20, 24:19 

AMERICAN ELECTRONICS, 5:19, 17:23, 18:18, 
20:24, 21:21, 25:21 

AT&T, 3:24, 5 :6, 9:20, 13 :7, 14:24, 16:20, 17 :24, 
21 :9&24, 24 :19, 25 :2 

AMPEX CORP. 

Ampex Audio-Prof. Products Co. merger, 6 :18 

Ampex Video Products Co., 8 :7 

financial reports, 6:20, 11:20, 13:24, 25:22424 

models, new, 5:18 

Oscar Class II Award, 15 :7 

tape recorders, 11 :14, 12 :12 

AMPHENOL-BORG ELECTRONICS CORP. 

5 :19, 8 :20, 9 :16, 14 :21&22, 20 :24, 22 :23 

ANDREA RADIO CORP., 10 :22, 17 :21, 22 :22 
ARVIN INDUSTRIES INC., 5:18, 8:20. 18:18 
AUDIO DEVICES, 16:20, 18:19 
AVCO CORP., 5:20, 13:24, 18:19 

AVNET ELECTRONICS, 1:20, 8:20, 12:18. 20:22, 
21:24 

BECKMAN INSTRUMENTS 
2:17, 4:20, 5:20, 9:19, 18:18 
BELOCK INSTRUMENT, 8:20, 19:20 

BENDIX RADIO DIV„ BENDIX CORP. 

1:20, 8:20, 10:22, 21:24 

CLAROSTAT MFG„ 16:20, 20:24 
CLEVITE CORP., 11 :20, 19 :24, 24 :19 
COHU ELECTRONICS, 15:20, 18:18, 19:24 
COLLINS RADIO, 3 :24, 13 :24, 22 :19, 26 :20 
CBS INC., 7 :14&23, 9 :1S, 17 :10, 20 :24, 23 :18 
CONRAC INC., 6:16, 9:19, 10:19&22, 17:22 

CONSOLIDATED ELECTRONICS IND„ 9:16, 
23:19, 25:24 



Associated Actors & Artistes of America, 18:13 
DGA : contract, networks, 4:11, 16:8, 17:13, 

18 :8, 19 :6, 23 :6 ; residuals, 10 :3 
IATSE: ATFP & AMPP contracts, 3:8, 4:8, 
5:10, 6:8; CBS walkout, 15:8; IBEW juris- 
dictional dispute, 3 :7 

IBEW: electronics import boycott, 4:17, 5:15, 
9:17, 11:18, 12:13, 16:18, 17:20: network con- 
tract, 6:11, 7:10; picket, WOGA Chattanooga 
sponsors, 4 :6 

Inter-American Entertainment Workers Federa- 
tion, 17:13, 22:9 

NABET: contracts: KYW-TV Cleveland, 7:6, 
network, 6:11; strike, KXTV Sacramento, 
11 : 1 1 , 18 :14, 23 :13 ; WWTV Cadillac, 23 :13 
SAG 

contract negotiations : AMG, 1 :12 ; MCA, 1 :12 ; 
movies, non-theatrical industrial & educa- 
tional, 5:11. 8:13; TV commercials, 3:13, 
4:8, 6:5, 18:12 
dues raise, 7:12, 11:8 
residuals, 7:12, 8:13, 10:3, 24:10 
SEG. membership meeting, 15:10, 21:14 
TV Producers Guild, 23:14 
WGA 

British writer guild affiliation, 2:11 
election, 11 :8 

residuals. 10:3, 14:10, 24:10 
strike: Nelson, Ozzie, 5:10, 6:8 
Tors, Ivan, fined, 21:14 
TV-radio writers awards, 7:13 
“TV on Trial” panel, 22:8, 23:15 

VOICE OF AMERICA 

Murrow, Edward R. Dir., 6:3, 7:14, 12:2, 13:4, 
22:3, 25:14 

radio station, roving, 5:9 

USIA: budget, 4:10, 23:4, 26:14 ; cabinet 

status, 7:14; criticism, 3:16; foreign TV 
report, 17:16; TV film distribution abroad, 
16 : 13 



CORNING GLASS, 2:14, 3:20, 4:16, 6:19&20, 
10:17, 11:18, 13:22, 16:18, 17:20&23. 21 :21. 25:17 

CROSBY-TELETRONICS INC. 

6:16, 7 :18&23, 10:22, 14:19, 26:18 
DALTO ELECTRONICS, 4:12&16 
DAYSTROM CORP., 5:20, 22:21, 24:20 
DELMONICO INTERNATIONAL 
3:23, 6:17, 9:18, 14:18*20 
DOMINION ELECTROHOME INDUSTRIES LTD. 
2:15, 7:20, 10:22 

DYNAMICS CORP. OF AMERICA, 14:23, 17:21 
18:18, 20:24 

EASTMAN KODAK, 8:17, 10:5, 21:16 
EITEL-McCULLOUGH, 18:18, 20:24 
ELECTRONIC ASSISTANCE CORP., 4:20, 13:24 

ELECTRONIC ASSOCIATES, 11 :19*20, 20:24 
24:19*20 

ELECTRONICS CORP. OF AMERICA, 11:20, 

23:19 

ELECTRONICS SPECIALTY CO„ 1:20, 5:19 

11:19, 14:21, 17:23 

ELECTRO-VOICE, 5 :20, 24 :20, 26 :20 

EMERSON RADIO & PHONOGRAPH CORP. 

Argentina subsidiary, 12:17 

Du Mont Emerson Corp., 10 :21 

Du Mont line, 2:17, 19:20, 25:20 

Emertron Inc., 5:17, 24:19 

financial reports, 2:19, 5:20, 13:24, 22:22 

Fleetwood Corp., Montreal, 13:22 

forecast for 1961, 8:18 

Granco Products control, 8:19 

Israel production, 9:18 

1962 line. 25 :20 

Peru licensee, 22 :20 

price-cuts, 11:18 

speaker system, 25 :20 

Telectro Industries merger, 11:19, 17:20 

Uruguay licensee, 22 :20 

ERIE RESISTOR, 9:18, 13:24, 16:20, 20:24, 21:24 
FAIRCHILD CAMERA & INSTRUMENT CORP. 
cable production plant purchase, 4:19 
Curtis Labs & Circle Weld purchase, 20:22, 21 :21 
Du Mont Labs, 11:18, 26:18 
financial reports, 12:20, 18:18, 24:19 
International Div., 16:17 
Waste King Corp. purchase, 9:16 

FEDERAL PACIFIC ELECTRIC, 10:22, 21:24 
FOTO-VIDEO ELECTRONICS, 20:4, 21:24 
GABRIEL CO., 8:20, 18:18 



MANUFACTURERS AND MERCHANDISERS 



5 



GENERAL BRONZE, 13:24, 19:24 

GENERAL DYNAMICS, 6:16, 7:20. 13:24, 1G:17, 
17:21, 20:24 

GENERAL ELECTRIC 

Auburn, N.Y., plant, 23:19 
Canadian GE, 11:20 
color, 9:16, 13:19, 16:15 

Communication Products Dept. Dallas office, 
18:16 

Communications Satellites Inc., 18 :6 
Compactions, 12:16, 13:22 
distribution system, 10:19 
financial reports, 6:20, 12:19, 17 :22 
imports, 6:17 

1UE propaganda campaign, 12:17 
Lynchburg, Va. plant, 2:17 
models, new, 2:17, 13:22 
NLRB charges, 9:18 
New Concord, O., center, 22:17 
1962 line, 23:17, 25:20 
Phoenix. Ariz. plant, 5:18 
Pittsfield, Mass, plant. 17 :21 

price-fixing case, 7:18, 10:19, 12:18, 13:6, 

14 :1&20, 15 :18, 25 :21 
rectifiers, selenium, 6:16 
science kits, 7 :19 

station equipment shipments, 17 :6 
stylus diamonds, 19:20 
Sunnyvale, Cal. lab, 2 :17 
TV monitors, 10:15 

TV sets: 19-in. portable, 1:15; Id TV-base sale, 
10 :20 : shields. 7 :20 
Valley Forge, Pa. center, 12 :17 
water cooler, 14 :22 
GENERAL INSTRUMENT CORP. 
financial reports. 3 :24, 22:22 
Hicksville, N.Y. plant, 2:17 
nuvistor uhf tuner, 10 :20 

Pyramid Electric acquisition, 12:15, 20:22, 21 :21 
GENERAL PRECISION EQUIPMENT CORP. 
financial reports, 7:23, 8:20, 15:20, 18:18 
Martin Co. suit, 9 : 1 9 
SEC registration, 14 :24, 18 :20 

GENERAL TELEPHONE & ELECTRONICS 

financial reports, 9:20, 13:19, 16:19, 17:23 
GLOBE-UNION, 9:20, 18:18 
GRANCO PRODUCTS, 2:15, 11:18, 12:15, 25:18 

HALLICR AFTERS, 1:20, 12:20, 16:19, 18:20, 

22:22, 24:19, 25:24, 26:20 

HARMAN-KARDON, 3:21, 5:18, 7:19, 10:19 
HAZELTINE ELECTRONICS CORP., 2:20, 12:20 
HEROLD RADIO & ELECTRONICS, 5:18, 20:22 

HEWLETT-PACKARD, 6:20. 7:23, 9:20, 13:24, 
14:21, 17:21, 22:22, 23:19, 24:19 

HOFFMAN ELECTRONICS CORP. 

commercial-products div., 12:15 

financial reports, 7 :23, 15 :20, 18 :18, 20 :22, 26 :19 

international trade dept., 5:18 

quits TV & hi-fi business, 7 :20. 14:18 

INDIANA GENERAL, 9:20, 18 :18, 19:24, 24 :18 

INTERNATIONAL RECTIFIER, 8:20, 12:19, 

19 :24, 25 :21&23 

INTERNATIONAL RESISTANCE CO. 

2 :19, 4 :18, 6 :1G, 8 :20, 10 :21, 12 :17, 19 :24 

ITT, 4 :13,18&19. 7 :19, 12 :16, 13 :17&24, 15 :19, 
17:21, 20:24, 21:21 

JERROLD ELECTRONICS CORP. 

annual report, 5:19 
CATV equipment 4 :5, 24 :7 
CATV systems, 2:9, 4:5, 13:17 
financial report, 24:20 
Harman Kardon purchase, 10:19 
Huntingdon Valley, Pa. lab, 5:18 
LAFAYETTE RADIO ELECTRONICS CORP. 

6 :18, 7 :23, 9 :19, 12 :18&20, 22 :22 

LING-TEMCO ELECTRONICS, 4:19, 5:19, 6 :16& 
18. 9:16, 10:19, 13:24, 14:21, 21:24, 23:19, 24:18 

LITTON INDUSTRIES, 10:22, 11:18, 12:17, 16:19, 

23 :20 

LORAL ELECTRONICS, 4:20, 5:19 9:16, 13:21, 

14 :21, 15 :17, 18:16, 23 :19, 24 :18 

MAGNAVOX CO. 

dealer franchises, 7 :19 

financial reports, 3:24, 7:24, 14 :23, 15:20, 1G:19, 
18:18 

Greenville, Tenn. plant, 5:18 

Jefferson City, Tenn. plant walkout, 9:18, 14:22 

models, new, 3 :22 

1962 line, 23:17 

organ, electric, 12 :17 

Paducah, Ky. plant, 2:15 

stock, 17:22, 19:23 

tape recorder, 24 :17 

warranty, labor — parts, 21 :21 



MAJESTIC INTERNATIONAL, 3:23, 24:17 
P. R. MALLORY & CO., 6:20, 15:19, 17:23, 23:19 
MICROWAVE ASSOCIATES, 14:23, 19:24, 21:24 
MINNEAPOLIS-HONEY' WELL, 6 :20, 17 :23 

MINNESOTA MINING & MFG., 8:19, 9:16, 18:17, 
20:24, 21:20 

MOTOROLA INC. 

antennas, auto, 5:18 
Canadian nifg. & mktg., 10:20 
color, 9 :16 

debentures, 14 :24, 18 :20 
financial reports, 12:20, 19:23 
imports, 6:17 

Lowry Electronics Inc., 11 :17 
models, new, 2:17, 3:22 
Phoenix, Ariz. plant, 22 :17 
radios, 15:17 
traffic control test, 17 :24 

MUNTZ TV INC., 2:17, 3:24, 14:22*23, 26:19 
MUTER CO., 6:18, 14:23, 17:21*23 
NATIONAL CO. INC., 2:19, 13:24 
NATIONAL UNION, 14:23, 20:24, 24:17 
NATIONAL VIDEO, 5 :18, 16 :16, 24 :19 
NEWARK ELECTRONICS, 1:20, 14:23 

OAK MFG. CO., 9:20, 10:19, 13:21, 14:23, 19:20, 
21:24, 24:20, 25:23 

OLYMPIC RADIO & TY r DIV., SIEGLER CORP. 

1 :18, 6:17, 17:21, 26:18 
PACIFIC INDUSTRIES, 3:24, 12:20, 26:20 
PACIFIC MERCURY ELECTRONICS, 4:19, 16:20 

PACKARD-BELL ELECTRONICS CORP. 

expansion eastward, 9:15, 14:21 
financial reports, 5 :20, 14:23, 18:18 
lockout of employes, 11 :19 
models, new, 5:18, 18:17 
1962 line, 24 :17, 25 :19 
wall TV, 24:17 

PERKIN-ELMER, 8:20, 23:20 
PHILCO CORP. 

Air Force contract, 22:19 
Bendix Home Appliance, France, 2:15 
Colombia licensee, 5:18 
color, 9:16, 24:15 

financial reports, 10:23, 15:18, 21:23 
foreign market operations, 4:14, 10:23 
Fort Washington. Pa. hq., 18:17 
models, new, 2:17, 17 :20 
1962 line, 23 :17, 24:15, 25:19 
Phila. Ch. 3 protest. 14:2, 15:5, 16:5 
receiving tube production, 23:18, 26:19 
TV sets: ETV, 24:17; Predicta, 15:18; warranty, 
parts & labor, 1 :15 
Washington exhibit, 21 :21 
PHILIPS LAMP WORKS, 19:24, 23:20 
POLARAD ELECTRONICS, 8:20, 18:16, 26:17 
RCA 

AFTE contract, 25:18 
airborne TV system, 13 :7 
beverage-inspection equip, sale. 13:21 
Burns, John L. Pres., 24:18 
circuitry, electronic, 7 :20 
color, 2:15, 4:19, 9:16, 11:16, 13:22 
dark heater, 10 :20 
dealer scholarships, 17 :20 
fellowships, 10 :21 

financial reports, 10:24, 19:21, 23:19 

future products, 20:21 

imports, 11:16 

1UE contract, 24:18 

microwave, longest, 22 :6 

models, new, 9:18, 12:15 

N.Y. uhf project transmitter contract, 10:11 

1962 line, 21 :18, 22:15 

nuvistors, 7:18, 12:16 

Palm Beach, Fla., data-processing center, 22:18 

Princeton, N.J. center, 9:17, 12:17 

promissory notes, 7 :24 

radios, 9 : 18, 19 :22 

RCA Sales Corp., 7 :20 

reorganization, 11:15 

seagoing TV system, 6:11 

tape recorders, 1:9, 10:15, 11:14, 21:16; ship- 
ments, 11:11 
translator equip., 4 :5 
TV distribution system, 1:11 
TV sets 

color-TV test instrument, 7 :20 
DC-restoration circuit, 3 :22 
portables, 14:19 
sales forecast, 9:18 
vhf transmitter, 14:15 

RAY'THEON MFG. CO., 5:20, 6:16, 7:21, 1G:20, 
18:16, 22:20 

HOWARD W. SAMS & CO., 4:20. G:18. 18:17*18, 
21 :19, 24 :18 



SANGAMO ELECTRIC, 11 :20, 19:24 
SEEBURG CORP., 5:20, 11:20 
SIEGLER CORP., 6:16, 8:20, 18:18 
SONOTONE, 5:19, 9:16, 13:24, 20:24 1 

SONY CORP., 6 :7, 9 :19, 13 :7, 18 :17, 19 :23, 24 :19 
SPEER CARBON CO., 4:18, 11:20, 19:24 
SPRAGUE ELECTRIC, 1:19, 6:18, 9:17, 13:24 
STANDARD KOLLSMAN INDUSTRIES 
Bedford Blanket merger, 1 :20 
Casco Products, 12:15, 18:16 
financial reports, 10:22, 18:18, 24:19 
stock split, 25 :24 
warranties, 5 :17 

STEWART-WARNER, 12:20, 18:18 
STROMBERG-CARLSON, 7:18, 16:17, 17:21 
SYLVANIA ELECTRIC PRODUCTS CO. 
color. 9:16, 10:17 
Houtzdale, Pa. plant, 22 :21 
imports, 6 :17 

inventory protection, 23:19 

1UE contract, 7 :20 

Mill Hall, Pa. plant, 5:18 

models, new, 10:21, 18:17 

19G2 line, 22 :15 

phosphor, 25 :21 

picture-tube exports, 10 :20 

Purolator promotion, 4:18 

radio warranty, 18:16 

Syivania Electro-Specialties, 13 :20 

TV sets: color, 6:18: new models, 2:17 

Warren, Pa. plant, 22:17 

SYMPHONIC ELECTRONIC, 3:22, 4:19, 6:19 
19 :24, 22 :19&23, 23 :18, 24 :17, 25 :18 

TECHNICOLOR, 8:20, 19:24 

TELECTRO INDUSTRIES, 11:19, 12:20, 13:21, 
14:24, 22:22 

TELEPROMPTER CORP. 

CATV systems, 7:24, 10:8, 24:7 
communication-wall system, 4:16 
education aids, 20:18 
financial reports, 17 :23, 20 :24 
Key TV system, 5 :3 

Patterson- Johansson fight, 1:11, 5:9, 6:9, 11:14 
production-services div., 8 :10 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS. 4 :18, 10:22, 11:20, 17:27. -i 
22:19, 25:21 

TEXTRON ELECTRONICS, 10:22, 18:16, 20:22, 

21 :24 

THOMPSON RAMO WOOLDRIDGE 

financial reports, 9:20, 18:18 

Pacific Semiconductors, 7:19, 8:20, 10:23 

Radio Condenser Co. purchase, 1:19, 10:23. 19:20 

SEC registration, 12 :20, 23 :20 

Space Technology Labs, 2:17, 10:23 

TRANSITRON ELECTRONIC, 5:20, 6:19, 7:23, 
16:17, 22:22 

TUNG-SOL ELECTRIC, 9:20, 18:19 
VARIAN ASSOCIATES, 6:20, 12:18, 18:20, 19:24 
VICTOREEN INSTRUMENTS CO., 12:18, 13:24 
WEBCOR, INC., 1:18, 3:24, 7:21, 8:19, 14:23 

WELLS-GARDNER ELECTRONICS, 12:16, 15:20, 
16:17, 19:23 

WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORP. 

bottled-water cooler, 13 :21 
color, 9 :16 

financial reports, 5:20, 10:21, 18:19 

generator, thermoelectric, 4:13 

home appliance & equip, contract, 7 :20 

kitchen ranges, electric, 9:18 

models, new, 3 :22 

molecular electronics, 26:15 

price-fixing case, 14 :1&20, 15 :18, 21 :24 

sales, 2 :20 

scholarships, 25 :21 

Science Talent Research, 10:21 

SEC registration, 10:24 

Teletronic Systems purchase, 4:19 

TV sets: production, 26:19: warranties, 1:17 

WILCOX-GAY', 17:23, 26:19 
ZENITH RADIO CORP. 
ad campaign, 17 :21 
color TV, 9 :2&14, 11 :16 
EIA, quits, 22 :17 

financial reports, 6:19, 11:20, 18:19 

hearing aid, 12:15 

imports, 6 : 17 

models, new, 12:15 

1962 line, 24:17, 25:19*20 

pay TV, 1 :10, 4 :2, 9:1, 14 :12, 19 :4 

radios, 6:18 

Rauland, 22 :21 

TV-stereo line. 1 :15 



6 



taci 

iw 31 



WEEKLY 



Television Digest 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



© 1961 TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. 



' /, 



— 



LjI 



: VOL. 17: No. 1 



ch 



The authoritative service for executives in all branches of the television arts & industries 



FORECAST 1961: Our own predictions for the new year in telecasting (p. 3). 

Another record, competitive year for home electronics (p. 16). 



SUMMARY-INDEX OF WEEK'S NEWS 



FCC 

REGULATING THE REGULATORS should be super-oversight func- 
tion of White House, James M. Landis tells President-elect in 
report castigating FCC (pp. 1, 7 & 8). 

LEE WANTS GRANT— OF UHF. He continues his push for all-uhf 
shift, decrying vhf squeeze-ins, saying that all-channel-receiver 
legislation isn't enough (p. 9). 

Programming 

LIVE WHITE HOUSE TV ASSURED by President-elect Kennedy's 
press secy. Pierre Salinger. He opens all Kennedy news confer- 
encs to instantaneous broadcasts (p. 2). 

Film <£ Tape 

SYNDICATION FIELD IS AMBIVALENT; producers are gloomy 

and salesmen are optimistic (pp. 6 & 11). 

RECORD NUMBER OF HOUR PILOTS in production. Hollywood 
film-makers turning out 35 or more for next season (p. 11). 

Auxiliary Services 

HARTFORD PAY-TV GO- AROUND provided again in replies by 
parties to each other's briefs on proposed test okayed by Broad- 
cast Bureau. No new issues raised (p. 10). 

ADLER'S FIRST VHF TRANSLATOR offered at $2,100— with orders 
on hand from 20 regular stations seeking extended coverage, 
100 inquiries (p. 10). 

AXE SWINGS ON MEDICAL TV at Army's Walter Reed Center, 
where 38 staffers get 30-day notices, but million-dollar unit's 
civilian chief won't say die (p. 1 1 ). 



Consumer Electronics 

ZENITH BOOSTS PRICES of some TV & stereo models, GE intro- 
duces 19-in. portable at $159.95, Philco announces 90-day parts- 
&-labor warranty in advance of Chicago Mart (pp. 15 & 18). 

FM STEREO STANDARDS may be set this month; FCC holds first 
stereo meeting, listens to tapes of NSRC field tests. Bartley 
expects "something before spring" (p. 15). 

ANOTHER RECORD YEAR seen in 1961 for consumer electronics, 
with heavy competition, low profit margins. TV, phono sales may 
exceed 1960, FM stereo offering new-product push (p. 16). 

MOTOROLA & PHILCO PRESIDENTS see 1961 business at least 
as good as 1960 (p. 17). 

OCT. PHONO SALES DROP 19% below 1959 level at retail, 
although 10-month cumulative 1960 sales are 10% ahead of 1959 
(p. 19). 

Stations 

NAB's YEAR OF TRIAL reviewed by Policy Committee Chmn. 
Clair R. McCollough, who finds advances by broadcasters in 
1960 more than made up for "bad headlines" (p. 9). 

TORONTO INDEPENDENT STATION CFTO-TV begins operation 
from $5-million installation, raising Canadian station total to 78 
(p. 10). 

Other Departments 

CONGRESS (p. 10). FOREIGN (p. 10). TECHNOLOGY (p. 11). 
ADVERTISING (p. 13.) NETWORKS (p. 14). PERSONALS (p. 14). 
FINANCE (p. 19). 



REGULATING THE REGULATORS: Caustic, controversial — and, to some, contradictory — 

criticism of govt, regulatory processes was poured out in 30,000 words last week by New Deal veteran James 
M. Landis in his delayed report to President-elect Kennedy on shortcomings of FCC & other agencies. 

Hard-&-wide-hitting Landis indictment boiled all over Washington , then simmered down to 3 main 
recommendations for agency reform by the incoming Democratic administration: (1) Replace political hacks 
with dedicated & competent administrators. (2) Overhaul & refurbish the whole system. (3) Put agencies 
under direct coordinating policy control of the White House. 

All of it had been heard before, from one source or another, in the quarter-century since the New 
Deal began sprouting alphabetical commissions & boards (with Landis & President-elect's father Joseph P. 
Kennedy among the incubators: Kennedy was the first SEC chairman; Landis helped him nurse it through 
its early days, then took over as 2nd chairman). But seldom had so much been tied together in one agency- 
damning document. 

And more will be heard from Landis before he's through with his special assignment for Kennedy. 
He'll continue as White House advisor on agencies in any event. Landis had denied earlier reports that he 



2 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



would go on the govt, payroll, but he agreed Dec. 29 to take a temporary job at the White House as Ken- 
nedy's special asst, for regulatory agencies to plan the overhaul. In this role he'll inevitably be tagged 
"czar" — although he bridles at any such title. 

Implementation of Landis report will be something else again. In his first reaction to it in Palm 
Beach, Kennedy said nothing about adopting the agency blueprint as a White House directive, observing 
only that: "This is a most important & impressive analysis of the regulatory agencies, which deserves the 
attention of members of Congress as well as the agencies themselves." And members of Congress— Demo- 
crats & Republicans together — will balk when & if they are asked to surrender any jurisdictional controls of 
"independent" agencies to White House. The President appoints their members, but the agencies were 
created by Congress, which always has regarded them jealously as its own babies — whether they've 
become monsters or not. 

Caustic comments by Landis on the regulatory operations of FCC (see p. 7) & the other agencies 
were received with surprising eguanimity within the castigated offices. There were no immediate public 
protests that Landis was unfair or didn't know what he was talking about. CAB Chmn. Whitney Gillilland 
went so far as to say the report was a "fine piece of work." FCC Chmn. Ford had no comment for publica- 
tion, but it was pointed out that many Commission faults & lags cited by Landis already were being corrected. 
A Commission spokesman told us: "Within the last year, we have adopted or got on the road everything — 
everything — that Landis recommended and that the Commission could do by itself. Why, we even asked 
for funds to entertain foreign communications dignitaries, but were turned down." 

Late in week, Ford issued the Commission's annual year-end statement , chronicling a series of actions 
to show that FCC was scarcely a do-nothing outfit in 1960. Said the report: "Many serious problems faced 
the Commission at the beginning of the year. The Commission attacked these problems with unusual vigor, 
which has resulted in many of them being solved & many others advanced to the point of decision" (for 
details, see p. 8). 

Controversial nature of proposals by Landis for agency reorganization under close White House 
ties was pointed up, however, by Chmn. Carroll (D-Colo.) of Senate Judiciary Administrative Practice & Pro- 
cedure Subcommittee. A loyal party man, he nevertheless warned in an understatement that Congress won't 
be quick to go along with any Kennedy administration plan to tighten the White House grip on agencies. 
As for Republicans, heat against Landis proposals- — & Landis himself — already was turned on last week. 
Ranking House Commerce Committee minority member Bennett (R-Mich.) said selection of Landis as overseer 
"will completely destroy the integrity & independence" of agencies. Bennett also suggested that Landis, 
whose law practice has included regulatory cases, may have "ulterior motives." 

Contradictions in Landis report cropped up particularly in his arguments for a super-oversight office 
under the President and in his indictment of FCC for submitting to outside pressures, some observers said, 
citing these instances: Landis scored what he said were improper White House influences on agency decisions 
during the Eisenhower administration. But he urged more — not less — policy intervention by the Democratic 
White House. He cited "evidence" that FCC was afflicted, more than any other agency, with ex-parte infec- 
tions. He stressed "suspicion" that networks dominate FCC. But at the same time, Landis complained that 
FCC is "far too subservient" to Congressional investigators who have done more than anybody else to 
expose such evils. 

LIVE WHITE HOUSE TV ASSURED: There'll be live TV & radio coverage of White House 

news conferences this year. President-elect Kennedy's press secy. Pierre Salinger made it definite & 
official last week. 

"TV & radio are communications media and I believe that they're most effectively used in a live 
situation," Salinger said in Palm Beach, reporting that doubts about opening conferences to cameras & 
mikes for instantaneous broadcasts (Vol. 16:49 p3) had been resolved. "We found that to be the situation in 
the campaign, and I believe we'll continue to hold that view." 

Precedent-making White House news plan probably will be put into effect at first Kennedy meeting 
with reporters, following his Jan. 20 inauguration, Salinger said. Special evening conferences will be 
scheduled from time to time thereafter to provide maximum TV audiences — and networks will be able to 
cover regular conferences live after getting prior permission from Salinger. He said he didn't anticipate 
that they'd want to carry all of them, however. 



VOL. 17: No. 1 



3 



Networks are "very receptive to this idea ," Salinger reported following 90-min. negotiations Dec. 27 
in Palm Beach with representatives of 4 networks — CBS News Pres. Sig Mickelson, NBC News vp William 
McAndrew, ABC Washington news chief Robert H. Fleming, Mutual vp Joe Keating. 

"Fireside chat" radio format developed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt will be revived & adapted 
by Kennedy for statements he may want to make to nation during televised conferences, Salinger added. 
But he quickly emphasized that this didn't mean that non-broadcast conferences would be less important: 
"We have never tailored the news to fit the time, and we're never going to do that." 

News conferences are exempt from Sec. 315 of Communications Act, but Republicans promptly 
warned that they'd be watching Kennedy performances for possible equal-time opportunities on air, 
anyway. "If Presidential news conferences are going to be used for propaganda purposes, then we Repub- 
licans will have to consider asking for equal time," said asst. Senate minority leader Kuchel (Cal.). 

LOOKING AHEAD; Here are the most educated guesstimates we can gather for you as to what 1961 
may hold for the field of television: 

Congress: Congressional wrath against broadcasters, incited by quiz & payola misbehavior, is 

pretty well spent. Barring fresh flareups of scandal — which aren't in sight — TV & radio should coast through 
new session without running into bad legislative trouble such as erupted into 1960's Harris-Pastore Act. 

Impact of Kennedy administration policies on industry is more likely to come from broad Congres- 
sional program for overhauling all regulatory agencies than from any reform moves aimed at broadcasting 
alone. And agency reforms, which could reshape FCC, aren't at top of Democrats' "must" list for 1961. 

Left-over let's-do-something-about-broadcasting bills will be revived in great numbers. New ones 
will be introduced in profusion. There will be Senate & House Commerce Committee investigations, much floor 
talk, many Congressional Record sermons on what's wrong with industry. Long-pending proposals for FCC 
regulation of networks, CATV controls, dual-reception vhf-&-uhf TV sets, reduction of station-license traffick- 
ing, stand better chance than some others of getting through Congress. 

Legislative Oversight Subcommittee won't be back in House, however — unless there's unexpected 
switch in plans. And although its Chmn. Harris (D-Ark.) will be on hand again, its doubtful that this session 
will generate enough legislative steam to scald industry severely. 

One thing weighing heavily in broadcasters' favor: Their generally-applauded fairness in coverage of 
politics (which members of Congress watch most jealously) in 1960, when they were placed on good behavior 
under suspension of equal-time requirements for Presidential election tickets. 

Federal Communications Commission: Much depends on who new chairman will be. There 
will be a continuing regulation-tightening process, regardless of chairman's identity — but speed & depth of 
action will be set by the chief. 

Relationships with Congress, courts & Executive Branch will be good — but, again, public performances 
of Commission's top spokesman will weigh very heavily. 

Tighter surveillance or not, however, FCC activity will have only very slight impact on actual broad- 
cast output. It would take many years of persistent Commission pushing — within the area restricted to it by 
law — to have perceptible effect on programming. 

But broadcasters will be kept more on toes in such things as ownership & financial reports, technical 
operations, logging, station identification, etc. 

Federal Trade Commission: Momentum built up at revivified FTC under driving leadership of 

Republican Chmn. Earl W. Kintner won't be lost in Kennedy administration changeover. If anything, 
Democrats will be out to surpass record set by aggressive Kintner in anti-deception ad & merchandising cases. 

This could be ominous for TV-radio broadcasting & manufacturing industries, which were peppered 
with FTC complaints — as never before — in the 18 months of the Kintner regime. Congress almost certainly 
will appropriate more money for expansion of such FTC police forces as the broadcast-monitoring unit, 
which looks & listens for fraud on air. There'll be no relaxation of FTC's wary scrutiny of manufacturers' 
& merchandisers' trade claims & gimmicks. 



4 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



There may be fewer headlines directly involving TV & radio stations, however. For one thing, 
payola scandals have just about been played out by FTC — and there's nothing quite like them in sight 
to provide sensations for newspapers. New source of embarrassment could be public disclosures in FTC's 
long-developing investigation of broadcast-rating services & how they're used competitively. But at their 
worst, any revelations of rating fakery probably would raise little more than intra-mural stir. 

NAB: Biggest unfinished business for harassed NAB in 1961 — and No. 1 entry on personal desk 

calendar of new Pres. LeRoy Collins — will be recruitment of members and/or subscribers to TV & Radio Codes. 

NAB still has long way to go before it will become fully representative of broadcasters. It starts new 
year under Collins leadership with strength in numbers at peak, but this strength, measured against potential, 
remains relatively weak. 

Collins is counted on as skilled administrator & engaging salesman to narrow the margins between 
NAB's program promise & performance. NAB's Board noted these demonstrated qualifications (as well as 
national stature he won as Democratic governor of Fla.) in picking politician Collins to succeed late Pres.- 
Chmn. Harold E. Fellows. 

But it's any broadcaster's guess how well Collins will succeed in his untried NAB job this year. He 
has no direct experience in industry. Especially at outset of term, he will depend heavily on counsel from 
such NAB Policy Committee veterans as Clair R. McCollough (who may take on job as Board chmn.). What 
Collins himself hopes to accomplish in specifics may be outlined Jan. 13, when he makes maiden speech as 
NAB pres, to Federal Communications Bar Assn, in Washington. 

It's safe to predict that NAB will hold its own, however, after surviving Congressional assaults and 
moving ahead without leader in industry's time of greatest adversity. It's also safe to predict that already- 
toughened TV & Radio Codes will undergo further revision to make acceptable commercials purer, and that 
N.Y. & Hollywood TV Code offices will mark up cooperative advances with advertisers 6t film producers to 
reduce bad taste, violence and sex on home screens. 

But gaps in TV 6c radio ranks remain wide. Tough task ahead for Collins is plain: More than a quar- 
ter of 525-odd commercial TV stations are not NAB members — and non-observers of the TV Code are almost as 
profuse. Only about half of 4,370 AM 6t FM stations are NAB members — and only about 25% of all stations 
(members & non-members) pledge compliance with Radio Code. 

Self-Regulation: Watch for steady "improvement" in TV programs 6t commercials in those areas 
now touched by regulatory machinery created during 1960. Sources at network & industry clearing points 
tell us that producers & admen have gotten past the first jolt of living with tighter rules, and are being forced 
to find creative substitutes for violence, ultra-hard commercial sell, etc. 

Networks aren't likely to spring any major new sets of rules in 1961 . There are still some die-hard 
advertisers (packaged drug products, cold remedies, deodorants, etc.) who aren't too happy about tightened 
"guide lines" now in force, but they, too, are expected to fall in line. At the same time, networks 6c NAB Code 
offices are expected to face a number of ticklish 1961 situations concerning dramatic specials 6c public affairs 
programs in "controversial" areas. Such problems, however, are likely to be faced with "more maturity by 
everyone concerned," thanks to such trail-blazing 1960 efforts as NTA's production of "The Iceman Cometh," 
predicts N.Y. Code Office. Similarly, stations will have to screen some of new crop of post-1948 pictures 
carefully, or else schedule them at adult viewing hours. 

Telecasting Balance Sheet: Total advertising expenditures on TV will continue to rise, but at 

slightly slower rate, bearing out predictions of such astute economists as CBS's Dr. David Blank, who sees 
figure going to $1.68 billion from 1960's estimated $1.59 billion. Industry's recovery from general business 
slowdown will be quick, showing improvement by 3rd quarter. Blank's estimated 1961 breakdown: network, 
$843 million; spot, $536 million; local, $299 million. These compare with his 1960 estimates: network, $797 mil- 
lion; spot, $511 million; local, $283 million. 

Station profits will show fair rise, similar to 1960's— but nothing like 1959's huge increase over 1958. 
Network profits will do well to hold 1960 levels, but o6co's will share station improvement. Radio, generally, 
will do about same as in 1960 — with local revenues showing slight rise, as usual. 

TV stat ion transfers will continue at modest rate, with relatively little activity in top markets, slight 
increase in medium markets. Prices will hold steady — except where a very large entity has a yen for a partic- 
ular market for reasons in addition to financial ones. 



VOL. 17: No. 1 



5 



Network Programming & Sales: "Bread-&-butter" program base will continue during 1961, 
with strong network emphasis on shorter (30-min.) comedy series & longer (60-min.) action-adventure shows. 
There'll be increases at all 3 networks, as compared with 1959 & 1960, in public-affairs & informational 
programming. Thanks to increased budgets and more status at networks, such shows will now be able to 
afford many of the production touches of straight entertainment programs. When network blueprints are 
made for the fall 1961-62 season, there's likely to be more scheduling of programs in radio-style "mood blocks" 
(comedy, adventure, etc.) because research shows that ratings are thus improved. 

Full sponsorship will continue to dwindle on networks, due to high costs (nearly $3 million annually 
for time & talent for a 30-min. nighttime co-sponsorship, for instance), desire of advertisers to reach a wide 
audience, and continued dominance of networks as primary program purchasers. Nearly all 60-min. shows 
will be sold in small chunks (l/6th-to-l/3rd sponsorships, often alternate-week). The sponsor identity that 
advertisers once liked to have with major dramatic shows (i.e., Philco Playhouse, Westinghouse Studio One) 
will continue to disappear, but will be replaced to large extent by strong identification between prestige- 
minded sponsors and growing number of public-affairs nighttime shows. 

Daytime TV will continue to be a 1961 growth area for all 3 networks, although most programming 
will be low-budget strip efforts & film reruns, and most sponsorship will be virtually on a participation basis. 
Multiplicity of brands of major TV advertisers is also likely to force a 1961 narrowing of "product protection" 
privileges at all networks. 

TV Allocations: FCC will finally decide on a program to keep vhf basically as is, but trying to 

accelerate growth of uhf. Keystone of plan will be all-channel sets, and Commission will strongly urge Con- 
gress to pass necessary legislation — bringing strong opposition from manufacturers. Massive long-range ETV 
allocation program will be laid before Commission in surprise move — and FCC will act to give ETV big chunk 
of high uhf channels for Stratovision & other ETV stations (see p. 6). FCC & industry will cooperate to improve 
service, through precise frequency control, improved transmitting antenna design, receiver refinement, etc. 

New 1961 TV Outlets: This year, as last (Vol. 16:1, p3), we're again predicting that no more than 
25 new stations will get on the air — and, again, that at least 5 of these will be educational non-commercial out- 
lets. 1960 starters totaled 24, one short of the number predicted (7 were educational). Our 1959 prediction was 
for 20, 4 less than actually got on the air, and our 1958 estimate of "not as many as 40" also was close, with 36 
beginning operation. In Canada, we predicted that slightly more than the 7 with licenses outstanding last Jan. 
would start in 1960, and 12 got on the air (5 of them satellites). Canada's 1959 record was but 7 new outlets. 
Our U.S. estimates are based on CP holders with equipment on hand and/or with network affiliations. 

Total CPs outstanding now number 133, but 19 of these are for educational stations and 62 for commer- 
cial uhf stations. In Canada there are 29 vhf channels which have been granted licenses or have been recom- 
mended for a license by the BBG — and more are on the way. 

Courts & Justice Dept.: FCC will fare well in courts, will seldom be reversed. If Robert 
Kennedy, as Attorney General, gets interested in option time, a battle royal will develop between Justice Dept. 
& FCC — because Commission is likely to stick by its pro-option-time decision despite its narrow 4-3 vote. Robert 
Bicks has a modest chance of staying on as anti-trust chief even though he's a Republican. By & large, Justice 
Dept, relationships with FCC & FTC will be good. Rep. Celler (D-N.Y.), chmn. of Judiciary Committee, will con- 
tinue to snipe at everyone. 

Talent Costs: Recent AFTRA-SAG victory means higher costs for network & spot advertisers dur- 
ing 1961. Assuming continuance of present campaigns, networks' talent costs will jump about 10%, and spot 
TV's will increase about 25%, based on new union scales. But there will be considerable effort by adver- 
tisers and agencies to bring costs back in line with previous spending, particularly in spot field. Many 
commercials will use fewer live actors, avoid group shots, etc., now that they cost more. Some advertisers, 
who want to maintain a particular "style" in commercials, may make their cutbacks in the length of station 
lineup used in spot campaign, sticking to major markets and avoiding secondary TV cities. Admen we con- 
tacted last week told us that "practically everybody" at account levels & in TV depts. of agencies has been 
carefully examining 1961 TV campaigns with an eye to cutbacks & budget-balancing. Talent cost-hikes for 



6 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



non-commercial network appearances, however, will be absorbed in 1961 by networks & advertisers without 
much protest. 

TV Film: This industry will again establish new production records. Expect about $170-million 

worth this year — vs. 1959's record $150 million — despite the charges of uncreativity. One reason for the 
increase: More 60-min. series, notwithstanding the failure of some this season. 

Action-adventure will lead next season, with comedy a strong second. Westerns will decline sharply, 
most producers having given up hope of finding another "Gunsmoke," and believing this program area to be 
exhaustively explored. Pilot-making will approach near-record proportions, nobody having yet come up with 
a better way to sell a show. 

Independents will continue to lead the industry in production volume; Four Star Television will be the 
leading challenger of powerhouse Revue Studios. Screen Gems will lead the field of major movie studios in 
TV. Warner Bros, will be runner-up, and action may be forthcoming from a revitalized 20th Century-Fox TV. 
Networks will continue their heavy participation in series, financially as well as by increased production from 
their subsidiaries. Networks will continue, too, to hold tight reins of program control, despite complaints from 
Hollywood producers that this stifles programming. 

TV film will get some respite from labor difficulties, now that its tangled negotiations with talent 
guilds have been resolved. Only potential trouble spot: LATSE negotiations. And tape will make no more 
progress selling itself to the industry than it did in 1959. 

Syndication: Domestic syndication sales picture looks brighter for 1961 than it has in several 
years, distributors tell us. (But from Hollywood we learn that there may be less new filmed product turned 
out in 1961 than ever before — see p. 11.) For one thing,, FCC-enforced cutbacks in network option time (Vol. 
16:52 p6) have at least put syndicators on a par with network shows scheduled in 7:30-8:30 (E.S.T.) slot for val- 
uable nighttime exposure. Those network shows failing to make the grade in this time may well be bumped 
by stations eager for the larger (700 on the gross dollar) revenue share that comes from spot-sponsored syn- 
dicated shows. There's also a product vacuum at the moment, which means that the first syndicators to 
launch new shows in 1961 will find the selling easier. Overseas syndication will continue to grow in terms of 
sales opportunities, but in dollar volume isn't likely to top 25% of the regular domestic volume. 

Feature Films: Additional post-1948 feature packages will be launched on the market in 1961, by 
all indications, continuing the trend that began in mid-1960. But there'll be no dumping of big library buys. 
Packages will be small, expensive, spaced-out. Last year, the number of Hollywood-made post-1948s, from 
major studios & independents, that reached TV market as "new" totaled 415, making nearly 550 post-1948s 
currently available. Guesstimated total for 1961 release: About 150 more. That figure may jump another 100 
or so if one or more of the major post-1948 holdouts (MGM, Paramount, Universal, Allied Artists, Disney, 
Goldwyn) decides to open its film vault to TV. Block-booking tactics, of course, are now illegal, but syndi- 
cators have in recent seasons been switching steadily to the sales strategy of De Beers Consolidated (which 
long ago learned that diamond prices are firmer if the available supply is fed slowly into the market in 
small batches). 

Educational TV: At least 6 — and perhaps as many as 10 — new ETV stations are expected to be on 
air by end of 1961, bringing total to around 60. Biggest spurt yet in ETV construction plans, looking toward 
establishment of twice as many new outlets in 1962, also should come this year through federal aid for equip- 
ment buying. Twice-blocked ETV legislation (providing up to $1 million per state) will have White House back- 
ing for first time under Kennedy administration, and it's good bet that Congress will approve it on 3rd try. 

But aside from federal aid, ETV will have exciting year. Most dramatic event will be midwest 
"Stratovision" experiment, financed by Ford Foundation. TV will be used for imaginative & ingenious school 
purposes on ground, too. Before 1961 is out, regional ETV networks probably will be operating in Midwestern 
<£ Western states as well as in South & New England. And NET's ambitious programming for its own ETV sta- 
tion circuit, on which tape recorders are becoming standard equipment, will be limited only by its budget. 

Community Antenna Systems: Another year of Washington problems, with strong probability 

of some type of federal controls — restrictive, but not crippling — despite fact that virtually all station-CATV con- 
flicts will be settled out of court. Closed-circuit operators, such as TelePrompTer, will make greater use of sys- 
tems for hot special events. At least one attempt will be made to put pay TV on systems, but results will be 



VOL. 17: No. 1 



7 



inconclusive by year's end. Litigation over program rights & copyrights will cook all year. Important new 
money will come into field via systems purchases. 

Pay TV: FCC will approve RKO-Zenith Hartford test, and experiment will get under way in modest 

fashion sometime in 1962, after a few more legal flurries. Early results will be inconclusive. Toronto cable 
system will be surveyed & resurveyed. Telemeter will report that "it's still too early to tell" and anti-pay forces 
will state that "things don't look too good." A few Congressmen will try to stop Hartford test but they won't suc- 
ceed — because Commerce Committees won't interfere. 

Closed-Circuit TV: Estimates for 1961 are conservative in this field , although the March 13 
Johansson-Patterson bout may establish a new record gross for a closed-circuit sports event. Nobody agrees 
precisely on the 1960 industry gross. Estimates range from Teletalent's $9.5 million (Vol. 16:52 p 13) to Tele- 
PrompTer's guess last week of less than $5 million. The latter firm, incidentally, expects to handle about 
80% of all 1961 closed-circuitcast business. Consensus for 1961: Between $5 & $6 million for major closed- 
circuit events. 

Position of closed-circuiting in communications field , however, is definitely established & will con- 
tinue its growth as "one of the leaders among the meeting media," stated Theatre Network TV Inc. Pres. 
Nathan L. Halpern last week. By Halpern's estimate, it's now possible to link 350 cities in a private telecast, 
and hookups of more than 50 cities will no longer be unusual. 

Foreign Investment: It looks like a hot year for U.S.-foreign TV deals, largely along the lines 
of those evolved during 1960. At the network level, look for more telecasting partnerships and co-production 
program deals with broadcasters in Australia, West Germany, Japan, Britain and Italy. Possibly, there'll be 
some trial deals with members of the new crop of African countries. ABC will continue its role of unofficial 
friendly adviser to Canadian commercial TV interests seeking to enlarge their commercial networking. 

Program producers & syndicators, who pioneered much of the U.S.-foreign TV relationship, will 
expand their interests (and sales) in 1961 to new TV areas. U.S. station reps are expected to explore deals 
with foreign broadcasters for reciprocal representation, and U.S. agencies will continue their steady over- 
seas growth. Major U.S. station groups are likely to make their appearance as TV partners on the interna- 
tional scene. 



The FCC 

More about 

LANDIS LAYS IT ON FCC: From the "quality of its top 
personnel” to its “Alice-in-Wonderland procedures,” 
FCC is a terrible example of a govt, agency gone astray 
from paths of regulatory virtues, President-elect Ken- 
nedy’s special advisor James M. Landis said last week. 

In his blistering report on the state of the agencies 
(see p. 1), Landis detected “considerable technical excel- 
lence” on FCC staff levels, but otherwise found little in 
Commission operations which merited anything but scorn. 
No agency escaped the wrath of Landis, but few were 
subjected to more withering criticism than FCC. 

What to do? Landis asked himself. In the first place, 
get some good men in there, he told Kennedy. And for 
the long haul: (1) Set up a separate White House Office 
for the Coordination & Development of Communications 
Policy. (2) Reorganize FCC under plans to be drawn up 
by a new White House Office for the Oversight of Regula- 
tory Agencies. 

This is what Landis had to say about FCC in a section 
of his report on “Suggested Remedies” for agency ills: 

“The Federal Communications Commission presents a 
somewhat extraordinary spectacle. Despite considerable 
technical excellence on the part of its staff, the Commission 
has drifted, vacillated & stalled in almost every major area. 

“It seems incapable of policy planning, of disposing 
within a reasonable period of time the business before it, 
of fashioning procedures that are effective to deal with its 



problems. 

“The available evidence indicates that it, more than 
any other agency, has been susceptible to ex parte presenta- 
tions, and that it has been subservient — far too subservient 
— to the subcommittees on communications of the Congress 
and their members. A strong suspicion also exists that 
far too great an influence is exercised over the Commission 
by the networks. 

“The quality of its top personnel is, of course, pri- 
marily responsible for these defects. The members of the 
Commission do not appear to be overworked in the sense 
that the Commission’s docket is bulging with cases calling 
for disposition. Nevertheless disposition lags. Only 32 
cases, all dealing with broadcast licenses, were decided by 
the Commission during fiscal 1959, other than cases dis- 
missed or in which the examiner’s report became final. 
Commission action following the examiner’s report in 9 of 
these cases took from 6 to 12 months, and in 10 cases from 
one year to 2 years. 

“In broadcast license cases, no criteria for decision 
have evolved. True, criteria of various different kinds are 
articulated, but they are patently not the grounds moti- 
vating decision. No firm decisional policy has evolved from 
these case-by-case dispositions. Instead, the anonymous 
opinion-writers for the Commission pick from a collection 
of standards those that will support whatever decision the 
Commission chooses to make. 

“Observers of the procedures employed by the Com- 
mission agree that the issues litigated are unreal, and a 
mass of useless evidence, expensive to prepare, is required 
to be adduced. 



8 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



“The uselessness of much of this evidence derives from 
several causes. The first is that programming proposed by 
applicants is of high-sounding moral & ethical content in 
order to establish that their operation of a radio & TV 
station would be in the ‘public interest.’ The actual pro- 
gramming bears no reasonable similitude to the program- 
ming proposed. The Commission knows this, but ignores 
these differentiations at the time when renewal of licenses 
of the station [s] is before them. 

“Nevertheless, it continues with its Alice-in-Wonder- 
land procedures. Also because of the varying standards 
that the Commission employs, a vast amount of unrealistic 
testimony is adduced to support each of these standards, 
incumbering the record with useless data. 

“On major policy matters, the Commission seems 
incapable of reaching conclusions. The uhf debacle has 
been plainly apparent for some 5 to 6 years. Nothing of 
any substantial consequence has yet been accomplished by 
the Commission to relieve the situation, although they are 
now purporting to make available additional vhf channels 
in one and 2 v-channel markets. 

“The procedures employed by the Commission in 
adjudicatory matters as well as in purely exploratory 
matters seem primarily at fault for these deficiencies. 

“Leadership in the effort to solve problems seems too 
frequently to be left to commercial interests rather than 
taken by the Commission itself. No patent solution for 
this situation exists other than the incubation of vigor & 
courage in the Commission by giving it strong & competent 
leadership, and thereby evolving sensible procedures for the 
disposition of its business.” 

As for the need for the White House-level Office for 
the Coordination & Development of Communications Policy 
— which would absorb telecommunications powers now held 
by the Office of Civil & Defense Mobilization — Landis said 
this is a govt, area “where effective inter-agency action is 
lacking.” 

He called the roll of agencies involved in communica- 
tions in addition to FCC: State Dept., National Aero- 
nautics & Space Administration, OCDM’s Interdepart- 
mental Radio Advisory Committee, Army, Navy, Air Force, 
Federal Aeronautics Administration. New space-age 
policy-making machinery is needed to update the Communi- 
cations Act of 1934, Landis told Kennedy. 

Landis said that one of the first jobs of the Office for 
the Oversight of Regulatory Agencies should be to 
overhaul FCC in a reorganization plan to be submitted by 
Kennedy to Congress. This should get “prime emphasis,” 
the President-elect was advised. 

As outlined for Kennedy by Landis, reorganization of 
FCC & other agencies (including FTC) would include 
provisions for: (1) Making it clear that the chairman’s 
“authority extends to all administrative matters.” (2) 
Giving the chairman appointive power over all personnel 
except Presidential appointees, division heads who must 
win confirmation by a majority of agency members, and 3 
special assistants picked by each member. (3) Delegating 
authority for final determination of adjudicatory matters 
(subject to discretionary review by members en banc) to 
panels of members, single members, hearing examiners 
of boards of employes. 



Contract with Empire State Bldg. — $93,000 a year 
for use of antenna & floor space for its N.Y. uhf project — 
has been signed by FCC (Vol. 16:46 p8). The Commission 
also stated that contract negotiations are under way for 
the construction of the station. 



More about 

FCC PROUD OF YEAR’S RECORD: Although FCC didn’t 
come out & say so, there’s considerable feeling around 
the Commission that the Landis Report was totally un- 
fair in its failure to acknowledge the many actions FCC 
has taken in the last year to cure the ills complained 
of in the report (see pp. 1 & 7) . 

By coincidence, the Commission’s year-end statement, 
issued after the Landis report was released, served as a 
rebuttal. Here are some of the points stressed by FCC: 

(1) Reduced network option time. 

(2) Removed networks from the spot-rep business. 

(3) Asked for legislation permitting FCC to regulate 
networks directly. 

(4) Conducted hearings on network program-selec- 
tion processes. 

(5) Moved to give boosters & translators greater free- 
dom in re-broadcasting network programs. 

(6) Issued a “landmark report on programming.” 

(7) Established a Complaints & Compliance Div. 

(8) Helped get laws to outlaw deceptive quizzes & 
payola ... to make clear that FCC can issue short-term 
licenses ... to give the Commission power to levy fines for 
rules infractions ... to require local notice by those filing 
applications or facing hearings ... to require Commission 
approval of mergers & pay-offs. 

(9) Drafted legislation to allow the formation of 2 
decision-making panels and the use of “summary judg- 
ment” procedure — to speed decisions. 

(10) Moved promptly on all ex parte cases. 

(11) Sought legislation for all-channel sets, to help 
solve the allocation problem. 

(12) Determined finally that more vhf spectrum could 
not be obtained fi’om the military. 

(13) Sought & received funds to experiment with uhf 
in N.Y. 

(14) Sought & received legislation allowing legaliza- 
tion of vhf boosters. 

(15) Drafted bill to resolve station-CATV conflicts. 

(16) Conducted a pay-TV hearing in 5 days, “and it 
is expected that the Commission will reach its decision 
shortly.” 

(17) Proposed rules to bar trafficking in licenses. 

(18) Aided Congress by questioning stations on their 
handling of political broadcasts under the new law. 

(19) Expanded the scope of FM multiplexing. 

(20) Prepared for an “imminent” decision on AM clear 
channels. 

■ 

Unconditional FCC approval of license renewals for 
KING-TV & KING Seattle, which had been held up on 
duopoly grounds (Vol. 16:50 p9), has been requested by 
King Bcstg. Co. Protesting the Commission’s requirement 
that the Pacific National Bank of Seattle dispose of its 
interest in competing stations KIRO-TV & KIRO, a peti- 
tion for reconsideration said that the fact that King 
Bcstg. Pres. Mrs. A. Scott Bullitt is a dir. & stockholder 
of the bank doesn’t run counter to FCC. 

Ex-FCC Comr. Richard A. Mack still is physically 
unable to stand retrial on Miami Ch. 10 conspiracy charges, 
U.S. attorney Oliver Dibble said in Washington last week. 
Asked if Mack would be brought to trial again in the case 
in which co-defendant Thurman A. Whiteside was acquitted 
in October (Vol. 16:52 p3), the prosecutor said the govt.’s 
decision would have to wait until Mack recovers. He was 
hospitalized during the separate Whiteside trial, 



VOL. 17: No. 1 



9 



Lee Wants Grant— of Uhf: FCC Comr. Robert E. Lee’s 

continuing crusade to shift all TV to uhf took him to 
Harrisburg last week, where he told the Kiwanis Club in 
that uhf area that the only method of expanding TV 
is “bold & decisive” action ordering a complete shift. 

He said that he recognized the action to be “drastic” 
and that it “could be most unpleasant unless it were on a 
gradual & long-range basis.” In the transition stage, he 
said, “I believe that we should work toward the ultimate 
goal with every conceivable encouragement to uhf broad- 
casting, including an expanded program of deintermixture 
in those markets where a single vhf station makes it diffi- 
cult for uhf to provide multiple services to communities 
rather than a single service to a large area.” 

If FCC’s N.Y. uhf experiment is a success, he said, 
“and I am sure that it will be based upon the fine service 
that uhf is rendering here and in other uhf markets, I 
believe that TV broadcasting will eventually come to be 
an all-uhf service. I know the transition will not come 
overnight. But it will & must come eventually. Were there 
to be receivers in every home capable of receiving uhf 
programs, transition could be accomplished in no greater 
time than it takes to assemble & erect the broadcasting 
stations — a matter of months . . . 

“The argument goes that there are in excess of 50 
million TV receivers in the country and that the cost to con- 
vert to uhf would equal the national debt. This is the 
grossest malarkey conceivable. Where was this argument 
a year ago when the Commission sought more vhf channel 
space? The system which the Commission proposed would 
have outmoded not only the 50 million vhf receivers but 10 
million uhf receivers as well.” 

Lee doesn’t think that all-channel set legislation, by 
itself, would help much. “Does anyone believe,” he asked, 
“that if Congress were to step in & give the FCC authority 
to require the manufacture of all-channel sets, that this 
magic wand would in itself create a competitive & adequate 
broadcasting system in the face of the proposed breakdown 
of vhf allocation standards?” 



One of most-litigated cases in FCC’s docket — the ob- 
jections of WAIM-TV (Ch. 40) against the site move of 
WSPA-TV (Ch. 7) Spartanburg — moved partially against 
the latter last week. After the case had been sent back to 
FCC by the Court of Appeals for the 3rd time in 8 years, 
accompanied by caustic criticism of the Commission, ex- 
aminers James Cunningham & Herbert Sharfman recom- 
mended that W SPA-TV’s CP for its present site be rescinded . 
However, they held that the station’s misrepresentations to 
the FCC regarding its site were offset by its broadcast 
history — and that it is still qualified to be a licensee. WSPA- 
TV originally received a grant for Hogback Mountain. It 
later obtained a grant for a “temporary” site on Paris 
Mountain. It did so to get a CBS-TV affiliation which it 
couldn’t have received because of overlap with CBS-affili- 
ated WBTV Charlotte. The Court of Appeals also held that 
WSPA-TV, in its application for the Paris site, misrepre- 
sented its intentions in a “calculated, deliberate and not 
insignificant” fashion. In addition, the Court said that the 
Paris site would deprive a substantial number of people of 
service. This, it asserted, obviously is “not in the public 
interest.” The examiners agreed with the latter finding of 
the Court. However, looking over the station’s broadcast 
record, they said they believe its performance is good 
enough to erase the stain of misrepresentation. Co-inci- 
dentally, FCC itself set aside its Nov. 30 renewal of radio 
WSPA, and placed it in the pending file until the TV site- 
move case reaches a final decision. 



Stations 

NAB’s Year of Trial: Broadcasters survived “bad head- 

lines” in 1960 and “reached the threshhold of freedom & 
influence” which the industry has always sought, NAB 
Policy Committee Chmn. Clair McCollough said last week. 

In a year-end review of the industry’s advances in the 
face of trials & troubles, McCollough recounted how TV & 
radio had come through “blackest days of 1959 & early 1960 
to be accorded a higher degree of faith & freedom by the 
legislative & regulatory agencies of govt.” 

He underscored these 1960 developments: (1) Sec. 

315-exempt handling of broadcast debates by Presidential 
candidates. (2) FCC’s apparent acceptance of the principle 
that broadcasters themselves should determine community- 
programming needs and how they should be met. (3) 
Improvement & expansion of self-regulation through NAB’s 
TV & Radio Codes. The last point also was stressed in a 
year-end statement by TV Code Review Board Chmn. E. K. 
Hartenbower. He said the “dramatic increase in TV Code 
subscribers & the growing prestige of the Code itself are 
living proof of the industry’s determination to live up to 
its responsibilities.” 

Pointing to record-high NAB memberships, McCol- 
lough added : “With initiative & vigor the industry can now 
continue to move forward, to grow in influence, both eco- 
nomic & social, and to work for the public interest, less 
hampered than ever before by archaic & unnecessary 
legislative & regulatory controls.” 

He cited these “touchstones for the future” for NAB, 
under the leadership of new Pres. LeRoy Collins, who takes 
office this week: (1) “A determined, organized effort to 
bolster the economy through ethical advertising.” (2) “A 
dedication, within our capacities, to the cause of better 
education.” (3) “A comprehension of the public interest, 
in order that we may meet it in a climate of decision freely 
made.” (4) “A concerted, organized effort to portray our 
industry to the public for what it is and aspires to become.” 



Radio KRKD (AM & FM) Los Angeles have been ac- 
quired by the International Church of the Four Square Gos- 
pel for $1.5 million from Trans-American Bcstg. Co. The 
owners of KRKD are A1 Zugsmith, Frank Oxarart, Jack 
Feldmann and the estate of Bob Yeakel, who bought the 
station in 1957 from Frank Doherty. The church presently 
operates KFSG, sharing time on 1150 kc with KRKD. A 
24-hour operation is planned, using the KRKD call letters. 
KRKD-FM will be operated non-commercially. 

Offer of $12.5 million for WKBW-TV & WKBW Buffalo 
has been made by Taft Bcstg. Co., but no agreement has 
been reached. Taft owns WKRC-TV & WKRC Cincinnati, 
WTVN-TV & WTVN Columbus, WBRC-TV & WBRC 
Birmingham and WKYT Lexington, Ky. 

“Trip-cue” cartridge tape recorder is being introduced 
by RCA for sound broadcast. The new RT-7A recorder is 
designed to produce 2 cue signals. The first is placed on 
the cue track to signal the beginning of a tape program 
in the conventional manner. The 2nd, recorded in a 
different frequency at the end of each recording, auto- 
matically turns on a 2nd recorder. 

Public service idea: KDKA-TV Pittsburgh obtained 
pledges of $40,547 during its annual 120-min. Christmas 
Eve show for the local Children’s Hospital. In 9 previous 
years, the station raised a total of $817,000. 

NAB’s AM committee under Chmn. C. L. (Chet) 
Thomas (KXOK St. Louis) meets Jan. 11 in Washington. 



10 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



NEW & UPCOMING STATIONS: Toronto’s privately 

owned station, CFTO-TV (Ch. 9), made its debut at 
9:45 New Year’s Day with an 18-hour fund-raising 
telethon for retarded children featuring special taped 
appearances by Eva Gabor, Johnny Mathis, Hugh 
O’Brian and other U.S. & Canadian personalities. 

CFTO-TV, Canada’s 78th station, was constructed at a 
cost of $5.5 million, including $3 million in RCA equipment 
— claimed to be RCA’s largest single broadcast equipment 
order. The station is equipped to broadcast in color, cur- 
rently banned in Canada. It radiates 325 kc from its 890-ft. 
tower. Licensee Baton Aldred Rogers Bcstg. Ltd. is owned 
51% by Toronto Telegram, 49% by Pres. Joel Aldred, U.S. 
& Canadian TV personality. Charles Baldour is station 
mgr. Base hour rate is $1,150. Sales rep for Western 
Canada is Television Representatives Ltd., Toronto & Mon- 
treal sales being handled by the station staff. 

* * * 

In our continuing survey of upcoming stations, here 
are latest reports from principals: 

XHFA (Ch. 2) Nogales, Mexico didn’t start Christmas 
Day as planned. Delay with construction has pushed target 
to March for programming in both Spanish & English on 
Arizona border. It will use Electron transmitter on Cabel- 
lero Mt. and a 150-ft. tower. 

CHOV-TV (Ch. 5) Pembroke, Ont. has ordered RCA 
equipment, including a TV tape recorder, and plans April 
programming, reports pres. & gen. mgr. E. G. Archibald, 
who is also pres, of radio CHOV. The station has an RCA 
transmitter in Pembroke, and is awaiting construction of 
its studio-transmitter building. Coming from radio CHOV 
are Ramsay Garrow, sales mgr.; Bill Kay, news & sports 
dir.; J. B. (Bun) Scott, promotion mgr. Base hour will be 
$150. Reps will be Young and Stovin-Byles. 

KUSD-TV (Ch. 2, educational) Vermillion, S.D. is 
keeping March 1 target for tests, plans April 1 program- 
ming, writes Martin Busch, KUSD radio-TV-film dir. for 
owner State U. of S.D. It received a 250-watt Sarkes 
Tarzian transmitter Nov. 16 and will use a Jampro antenna 
on a 150-ft. tower furnished by Tower Construction Co. 
Closed-circuit system, in operation for 3 years, will be 
discontinued, and its studios will be used by KUSD-TV. 

Congress 

Final TV-radio-FCC report by the Commerce Legisla- 
tive Oversight Subcommittee (Vol. 16:52 p2), due when 
Congress convenes this week, has been delayed. Chmn. 
Harris (D-Ark.) had planned to get his Subcommittee 
together last week for a scissors-&-paste job on the windup 
report by the staff, which was released Dec. 21. But 
Republicans on the Subcommittee were reported still 
smarting over free-wheeling criticism of CAB, ICC and 
FPC by the staff. And there weren’t enough members on 
hand in Washington for a meeting, anyway. Harris was 
expected to try again this week. 

Foreign 

Cuban govt, fired 68 employes of CMQ-TV last week, 
following a fire which burned out the elaborate Havana TV 
installation. The employes of the station, which had been 
seized by the govt, from the Mestre brothers, were not 
specifically implicated in the fire. They included tech- 
nicians & newsmen whose loyalty to the Castro govt, was 
challenged and who were considered security risks. The 
fire was caused by a saboteur who threw phosphorus into 
the station’s air vents. 



Auxiliary Services 

Hartford Pay-TV Go-Round: Zenith-RKO General’s pro- 

posed WHCT Hartford pay-TV operation, endorsed by 
FCC’s Broadcast Bureau for a 3-year test (Vol. 16:49 p2), 
got another going-over in reply comments filed with the 
Commission last week, but none produced new issues. 

Protesting theater interests, represented by Marcus 
Cohn, called on FCC to reject Broadcast Bureau recomen- 
dations for the pay-TV trial by Hartford Phonevision Co. 
in 33 pages of comments. The theater owners argued again 
that the pay-TV promoters hadn’t shown that operations 
“will be carried on for the public’s welfare and will not 
cause serious deprivations to the viewing audience.” Added 
Cohn: “According to its own calculations, the applicant 
will make a profit of more than $2 million instead of losing 
$1 million during the 3 years.” 

Not unexpectedly, Hartford Phonevision counsel W. 
Theodore Pierson concluded (in 34 pages) that proposed 
findings & conclusions by the Broadcast Bureau largely 
“represent a fair appraisal of the facts.” 

For the Broadcast Bureau, attorney Louis C. Stephens 
said there was no need for “over-burdening the record with 
needless repetition” of its views. Stephens limited his reply 
comments to 4 pages, enlarging on recommendations that 
Hartford Phonevision be required to furnish FCC full data 
about pay-TV costs, programming agreements, etc. 



Adler’s First Vhf Translator: Dominant uhf-translator 

manufacturer Adler Electronics now makes a bid for the 
vhf market, announcing its one-watt VST-1 and offering it 
at $2,100. Pres. Ben Adler also reports that he is expanding 
at such a rate that more working capital is needed and 
he plans a public stock offer shortly. 

Adler says he’s going after “the quality market,” 
noting that some other companies’ devices are out at $800- 
$1,000. He says he has orders for 20 units — all from TV 
stations seeking to extend coverage, none from illegal 
booster operators. In addition, he reports more than 100 
inquiries — all these also from stations. 

The average antenna costs $200 extra, Adler said. His 
firm can supply all equipment, will on request do a “turnkey 
job,” even building roads if necessary. 

The VST-1 featui’es automatic unattended operation, 
heterodyne conversion techniques, remote control facilities. 

Adler says he has sold some 50-60 vhf translators for 
foreign operation. They’re bigger units, up to 150 watts. 

Some 400 Adler uhf translators are in use here & 
abroad, according to Adler. Of these, 45 use 100-watt 
amplifiers. The 10-watt unit runs $3,025, the amplifier 
$5,200, and the average antenna $1,000. 

A nice chunk of business is in the works in Italy, 
reports Adler. He’s negotiating to license Raytheon to 
build uhf translators in its Italian plant. That country plans 
to make its 2nd program service all-uhf, and intends to 
install 500-1,000 translators within 3 years. 



Protest by CATV system against vhf boosters, first of 
its kind (Vol. 16:50 pl9), was granted by FCC last week 
when it set aside the special operating authority granted 
to Bloomfield Non-profit TV Assn., Bloomfield, N.M. Aztec 
Community TV Inc. had complained that the boosters 
produce “intolerable” interference at Aztec’s receiving 
antenna. However, the Commission refused Aztec’s request 
that the boosters be shut down immediately. It ordered a 
hearing to be held in Bloomfield in order to “avoid imposi- 
tion of an onerous financial burden.” 



VOL 17: No. 1 



11 



Axe Swings on Medical TV: The Army last week began 

executing its budget-economy death sentence against Wal- 
ter Reed Medical Center’s TV unit (Vol. 16:52 p8). But the 
civilian chief of the unique million-dollar facility clung to 
a conviction that a reprieve would yet come. 

On schedule, the office of Walter Reed’s commander 
Maj. Gen. Clement F. St. John handed out Dec. 30 dismis- 
sal notices to 18 of 31 civilian staffers at the TV center, 
effective in 30 days. At the same time, 20 of 26 enlisted 
men assigned to the unit got transfer orders. 

Unless the dismissal-&-transfer orders are counter- 
manded, the TV center won’t survive past the 30-day grace 
period, but exec. dir. Dr. Paul W. Schafer told us: “I have 
complete hope.” He had refused to issue notices himself, 
but offered to fire himself — an offer which hadn’t been ac- 
cepted by Gen. St. John at last week’s end. 

Dr. Schafer said he didn’t know just where to look for 
action which would save the 5-year-old medical instruction- 
&-demonstration TV operation. He indicated, however, 
that he was counting on Congress as one source of help. 

“I have too much faith in the American people & the 
elected representatives of the people — and in the leaders 
of the scientific community — to think that they will let it 
die,” Dr. Schafer told us. 

“I just am of the conviction that in these 30 days there 
will be enough concern about the future of science & educa- 
tion to bring relief.” 

■ — • 

Re-match between heavyweight champion Floyd Pat- 
terson & contender Ingemar Johansson (March 13) is ex- 
pected to play before a closed-circuit TV audience of 80,000 
in N.Y. alone. The Miami fight will be fed to Madison Sq. 
Garden (17,000 seats) and Roosevelt (40,000) and Yonkers 
(20,000) Raceways, in N.Y.; also to the Los Angeles Col- 
iseum. These audience estimates came last week from Wil- 
liam D. Fugazy, pres., Feature Sports Inc., promoters of 
the 3rd bout between the 2 heavyweights. He added that 
he expected the match to gross $4 million. Fugazy’s audi- 
ence estimates, however, were termed “premature” in N.Y. 
by Madison Sq. Garden gen. mgr. Harry Markson, since no 
firm commitment has been made. And officials of the 2 
harness tracks pointed out that Fugazy’s estimates there 
are based on having an indoor-outdoor viewing arrangement 
subject to weather conditions. TelePrompTer will handle 
the TV closed-circuiting. 

Technology 

TV satellites should be operated by private industry in 
the U.S. following initial govt, experimental work, accord- 
ing to a policy statement adopted at the White House. Sup- 
porting (just-resigned) Dir. T. Keith Glennan of the Na- 
tional Aeronautics & Space Administration, who outlined 
the policy in an October speech (Vol. 16:42 p24), the policy 
declaration says the govt, should be ready to launch — at cost 
— developmental satellites produced by industry. But after 
that, the policy calls on industry to take ultimate respon- 
sibility for establishing & operating any global communi- 
cations network. AT&T already has applied to FCC in an 
effort to be first in space with an industry-owned-&- 
operated system (Vol. 16:50 p6). 

Boston’s Lake Service Corp. disputes RCA’s claim that 
its new bi-directional TV distribution system is “a major 
advance in the distribution of ETV signals to classrooms” 
(Vol. 16:51 pll). Lake Pres. Fred S. Lakewitz claims his 
company “developed the first such system 5 years ago and 
we have made a number of such installations in govt, es- 
tablishments as well as in educational facilities.” 



Film & Tape 

More ab out 

SYNDICATION PRODUCTION DIP: The indication that 
fewer syndication films will be produced in 1961 than 
ever before comes as no particular surprise. The mar- 
ket has been soft for some time, and station buyers 
haven’t been showing any great enthusiasm for such 
merchandise — although Eastern sales depts. are opti- 
mistic because of option-time cutbacks (see p. 6). 

While 1961 plans are still being crystallized, current 
production schedules indicate there may he about a dozen 
new syndicated series. Cal. National Productions is plan- 
ning 7, CBS Films 4, Screen Gems, 2. This isn’t necessarily 
the firm figure inasmuch as some companies will first seek 
network exposure — as CBS Films succeeded in doing this 
season with Angel. 

For the record, however, Screen Gems has filmed 2 
pilots for syndication : Shannon and The Man in the Middle. 
CNP is planning 3 White Hats, produced by Wilbur Stark 
& A1 C. Ward; Police Surgeon, with Henry Kessler as pro- 
ducer; a vehicle from the producing team of Ray Singer 
& Dick Chevillat; War Birds, with A1 Simon of Filmways 
TV as producer; 2 Sam Gallu series. CBS Films’ plans 
include an action-adventure series from Burlingame Pro- 
ductions, and The Rolling Stone, Mr. Dodd and Charles 
Russell. 

Most Hollywood producers are allergic to turning out 
syndicated films because (1) the market is glutted; (2) 
films must have low budgets — and therefore less quality; 
and (3) a network sale generally recoups his production 
investment for the producer on the first-run. 



1961 -HIGH FOR HOUR PILOTS: More 60-min. pilots 
than ever before are currently under way in Hollywood. 
In excess of 35 such projects will emerge next season. 

This has developed despite the lack of success of most 
60-min. entries this season (Vol. 16:46 p9). Ironically, 
early-season casualties included three 60-min. series : River- 
boat, Dan Raven and The Islanders. 

The new pilots include comedy, action-adventure, cir- 
cus shows — and only one Western. 

Among the larger companies: Producer Nat Holt and 
Revue Studios have filmed The Denver & the Rio Grande. 
Desilu Productions will pilot Homicide and Counter-Intel- 
ligence Corps; Four Star Television plans a Western, to be 
produced by Vincent Fennelly. Screen Gems is filming The 
Insider, and is considering pilots for Safari, Baron of Bos- 
ton and Grand Deception. MGM-TV will pilot Cain’s 100 
and Woman in the Case. Warner Bros, will pilot Solitaire 
and will film Las Vegas as a movie, to serve as pilot for a 
new ABC-TV series — the same procedure used for 77 Sun- 
set Strip. 20th Century-Fox TV is planning Kilimanjaro, 
Bus Stop, The Jayhawker, The Circus, Silent Investigators. 

Other 60-min. pilots: The Lawyer, 87th Precinct and 
Stage 61, Hubbell Robinson Productions. Las Vegas Beat, 
Goodson-Todman. Rio, Roncom Productions. Dr. Kate, 
Telman Inc. The Big Tent and 3 Men & a Girl, NBC-TV. 
The New Breed, QM Productions. 3 to Make Ready, Tan- 
dem Productions. Patrol Boat 999, Lindsley Parsons and 
Allied Artists. Room 63, Girard-Lewis Productions. Hurri- 
cane Island, Marina, The Defenders, CBS-TV. Three 
pilots, (one with Revue Studios), Jack Chertok Produc- 
tions. M.R., Dozo Productions. Jamaica Reef, Richard L. 
Bare, Caribe Inn, Russell Hayden. 



12 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



NEW YORK ROUNDUP 



$500,000 tape installation is planned for N.Y. in 1961 by 
Sports Network Inc., Pres. Richard Bailey said last week. 
It will be operated by National Video Tape Productions Inc., 
an 18-month-old div. of Sports Network, and will be 
located at 36 W. 44th St. When completed, the new tape 
center, plus new studio facilities in East Rutherford, N.J., 
will make the sports network offshoot “one of the largest 
independent total tape services,” according to Bailey. The 
company now has 7 mobile units in operation around the 
country, of which 4 are tape-equipped. Sports Network 
now claims to be the 4th largest customer of AT&T in the 
broadcast field. 

Add syndication sales: Colorama features has sold its 
post-1948 Pine-Thomas package in 32 markets to date, in- 
cluding WOR-TV N.Y., KHJ-TV Los Angeles, WBBM-TV 
Chicago . . . NTA’s The Play of the Week has been bought 
by WTVT Tampa & WINR-TV Binghamton, N.Y., bring- 
ing the total markets to 70 . . . Ziv-UA’s Case of the Dan- 
gerous Robin has sold in 189 markets to date. Recent sales 
include: WROC-TV Rochester, WXEX-TV Petersburg, 

Va., WATE-TV Knoxville. Sale of another Ziv-UA prod- 
uct — Miami Undercover to WHDH-TV Boston — brings the 
market total for that series to 92. 

Production of animated cartoons for TV will rise from 
$20 million to a record $30 million in 1961, predicts UPA 
Pictures Pres. Henry Saperstein. UPA will allocate $1 
million to 104 Mr. Magoo episodes and $2 million to 156 of 
Dick Tracy. The company used 500,000 feet of film in 
1959, 2 million in 1960, and expects to use 7 million in 1961. 
In addition to its series, the studio has a heavy spot- 
commercial schedule. 

Videotape Center, N.Y.-based commercial-taping facil- 
ity, expects 1960 to show a “70% sales increase,” reports 
vp & gen. mgr. John B. Lanigan. Sales figures for the first 
11 months showed a 67% gain over the same 1959 period. 
For 1961, Lanigan predicts a 40% sales rise, adding that 
“we wouldn’t be surprised to see this estimate topped by a 
large margin.” 

Scarcity of new syndicated shows (see p. 11) has 
prompted Screen Gems to start a mid-season sales cam- 
paign on a 26-episode adventure series called Tallahassee 
7000, starring Walter Matthau as a special agent of the 
Florida Sheriff’s Bureau. SG has already sold the show in 5 
major markets, including WCBS-TV N.Y. 

Transfilm-Caravel, Buckeye Corp.-owned producer of 
TV commercials, industrial films, business shows & training 
programs, has acquired Klaeger Film Productions, N.Y. 
after more than 2 months of negotiation. Robert H. Klae- 
ger, former pres, of his own firm, was named senior vp of 
Transfilm-Caravel as well as president of the new film pro- 
duction division. 

Film Producers Assn, of N.Y., a trade group including 
many producers in the TV commercial field, has accepted 3 
more members: Gray-O’Reilly Productions, Marathon 

International Productions, 411 Sound Recording Studios. 

People: Renville McCann has been named by Trans- 
Lux to direct a sales expansion in closed-circuit TV for 
industrial & commercial organizations . . . Harold Klein 
has been appointed Film Producers Assn. exec. dir. . . . 
Bruce Collier has been made UAA Southwestern div. mgr. 



HOLLYWOOD ROUNDUP 



Long-projected $4-milIion Hollywood motion picture & 
TV museum got the green light last week, when the Los 
Angeles County Board of Supervisors, in an about-face, 
voted 4-1 for an initial allocation of $162,000 for arch- 
itectural fees for the structux-e (Vol. 16:51 p4). The County 
also agreed to donate 4.5 acres of land for the project, pick 
up an estimated $340,000 tab for an additional 1.5 acres 
and guarantee a $4-million construction loan. Previously, 
the supervisors had balked at the project, demanding that 
the film industry pay half the cost of the project. The 
movie industry declined to donate cash, but will contrib- 
ute some $5-million worth of filmland memorabilia. 

Screen Actors Guild has granted MCA a 60-day exten- 
sion of a waiver under which the talent agency’s TV-film 
subsidiary, Revue Studios, operates as a production com- 
pany. The Guild also granted an extension on its contract 
with the Artists’ Managers Guild. Both contracts would 
have expired Dec. 31. SAG granted the extensions because 
Guild executives were too busy with TV & movie negotia- 
tions in 1960 for negotiations with MCA and AMG. 

Selmur Productions, AB-PT’s film-&-tape production 
subsidiary, embarks on its initial film series soon with a 
30-min. pilot for a dramatic series. It is now seeking a 
male lead. Selmur also plans to pilot Direct Line, a taped 
documentary series recreating human-interest events. Peter 
Robinson is producer. 

Starward Productions, owned by producer Wilbur Stark 
& writer A1 C. Ward, will co-produce 3 White Hats, an 
action-adventure series, with Cal. National Productions. 
The pilot will be filmed in January . . . Goodson-Todman’s 
pilot of Tiggero, an action-adventure series, will be filmed 
Jan. 20, with Harry Julian Fink as producer. 

CBS Films in Hollywood is moving to new quarters at 
6121 Sunset Blvd. in Columbia Square . . . Producer Rus- 
sell Hayden has filmed a 60-min. pilot, Caribe Inn, starring 
Jeffi’ey Stone, Don Dorrell and Tommy Cook. 

Skelton Studios has taped a 60-min. special, The Song 
& Dance Man, starring Dan Dailey, for producers Buddy 
Bregman & Paul Benton. 

Disneyland Park & the Disneyland Hotel, Anaheim, 
Cal., plan a $6-million expansion program in 1961 — includ- 
ing a $1.9-million monorail system to link the pai'k & hotel. 

People: Tony Muto has been named head of the story 
dept, at 20th Century-Fox TV, replacing Kenneth Evans, 
who resigned . . . Robert Walker has left 20th Century-Fox 
TV, where he was head of casting . . . Herbert Hirschman 
has left 20th Century-Fox TV to join MGM-TV as a 
producer-dii'ector. Fletcher Mai-kle & Art Wallace replace 
Hirschman as pi'oducers on Hong Kong . . . Morton Fine & 
David Freidkin, producei’-director-writing team, have left 
Ziv-UA to produce their own TV series . . . Charles Russell 
has been named an alternate pi-oducer of Adventures in 
Paradise at 20th Century-Fox-TV . . . Richard Berg has 
left NBC-TV w r here he has a producer-writer contract . . . 
Edward Walsh named story editor on The Gunslinger, new 
series. Preston Foster has been added to the regular cast of 
the Charles Marquis Warren-produced Western . . . N.Y. 
attorney George Elber has joined Four Star Television as 
vp & exec. asst, to exec, vp Tom McDermott. He will be 
in chai-ge of business & legal affairs. 




VOL. 17: No. 1 



13 



$7.5-million “blacklisting” suit was filed against 8 
major Hollywood studios (of which 7 are active in TV pro- 
duction), the Motion Picture Assn, of America and the 
Assn, of Motion Picture Producers in Washington Dec. 30. 
Plaintiffs in the action are a dozen movie writers & actors 
who charged that a “political blacklist” has kept them out 
of film work since 1947. Seeking redress under anti-trust 
laws are writers Nedrick Young, Albert Maltz, John How- 
ard Lawson, Hei’bert Biberman, Lester Cole, Robert L. Rich- 
ards, Frederick I. Rinaldo & Philip Stevenson, and perform- 
ers Gale Sondergaard, Alvin Hammer, Mary Virginia 
Farmer & Shimen Ruskin. The group’s attorney, A. L. 
Wirin, stated that the suit would “detail how the alleged 
blacklist has been employed.” Some of the plaintiffs were 
among the so-called “Hollywood 10” convicted in 1947 of 
contempt of Congress following a probe of Red activities in 
the movie industry. (Interesting exception: “Hollywood 10” 
writer Dalton Trumbo, who has worked under various 
pseudonyms and who wrote the screenplay for “Exodus,” is 
not a party to the suit.) The studios charged with black- 
listing are MGM, Columbia, Paramount, 20th Century-Fox, 
Warner Bros., Universal, Disney and Allied Artists. Only 
Universal is currently not represented with network or 
syndicated telefilm shows. 

Warner Bros, production of Maverick was not “mater- 
ially hampered or interrupted” by the writer strike, said 
Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Arnold Praeger last 
week, in his formal ruling on behalf of James Garner, who 
had charged WB with breach of contract when it invoked 
force majeure and took him off the payroll last March 3 
(Vol. 16:49 p8 et seq.). In his written decision, Judge 
Praeger said WB had continued production of the series 
during the strike so that the strike did not give Warners 
the right to stop paying Garner. The star had finished the 
Maverick series for 1959-60 and one episode for the follow- 
ing season, he found, and WB could have begun production 
on Mavericks for this season as late as May 1960. Refusal 
of Warners to pay Garner was “willful, deliberate and not 
in good faith,” and constituted a “total breach of contract” 
declared the judge, in freeing Garner of his contract. 
Garner was also awarded $1,750 damages — one week’s pay. 

Temopic Enterprises S.A. has been formed by pro- 
ducer Eugene Rodney & Robert Young ( Father Knoivs 
Best), for production of a CBS-TV series to star Young. 
They may make a pilot in March at Desilu Gower, where 
their new firm is quartered. Rodney told us that Father is 
currently being shown in 22 countries . . . Producer-writer 
team of Ray Singer & Dick Chevillat will make a pilot, 
Marty & Me, a comedy which may star Tommy Noonan. 
Cal. National Productions may finance the January pilot. 

CBS-TV is piloting High Time, a comedy, in February. 
Plan is to showcase it on GE Theater. Cecil Barker is 
producer . . . Mark VII Ltd., long dormant in TV, is re- 
turning to production with a comedy pilot, The Barbara 
Nichols Show, to be filmed in Feb. or March. Jack Webb 
will produce . . . Producers Bill Thomas & Sam White go 
into production Feb. 1 with their action-adventure pilot, 
Ski Patrol. 

Tandem Productions’ producers Bud Yorkin & Norman 
Lear will pilot the 60-min. comedy, 3 to Make Ready, for 
CBS-TV Feb. 1, and a comedy, Meet Me at Danny's, star- 
ring Michael J. Pollard, in mid-February. 

Film City Enterprises, owned by producer-writer Herb 
Meadow, will pilot The Big Fever . . . Ziv-UA has piloted 
The King of Diamonds, starring Broderick Crawford, with 
John Robinson as producer. 



Advertising 

Best Campaigns of ’60: Admen had a chance to toss 

bouquets at last year’s top TV commercials in N.Y. last 
week when J ournal- American ad columnist Doris Willens 
invited agency executives to pick their favorite TV cam- 
paigns done by agencies other than their own. Gist of their 
choices : 

James F. Egan, senior vp of Doherty, Clifford, Steers & 
Shenfield : “The new commercials for Crest toothpaste. A 
skillful documentary approach.” David McCall, vp & as- 
sociate copy chief, Ogilvy, Benson & Mather: “Remington 
electric shavers. A good straightforward honest demon- 
stration, thoroughly believable.” Stanley Tannenbaum, vp 
& creative group head, Kenyon & Eckhardt: “The Johnson 
& Johnson baby-product commercials. The very simplicity 
puts [them] far above most of what you see on TV.” Peter 
Hilton, pres, of Kastor Hilton Chesley Clifford & Atherton: 
“The Kraft campaign on TV. Some of the best I have ever 
seen.” Ben Alcock, vp & associate creative dir., Grey: 
“Pontiac. For imaginative demonstration.” 

Phyllis Robinson, vp & copy chief, Doyle Dane Bern- 
bach: “Ban. For a strong & fresh approach.” Arthur 
Bellaire, associate copy dir. for TV-radio, BBDO: “Two, 
which are direct opposites — the Maxwell House percolator 
commercial and Polaroid Land Camera.” 



Rep-fostered rate-card revisions were announced by 
Young-TV and Katz Agency in N.Y. last week. The new 
Young-TV cards establish “a relationship between spot 
price, spot value and demand.” Each card is divided into 3 
parts, and each part is a complete card in itself, containing 
package plans, basic spot & program rates. Spot campaigns 
placed under rates in the first section are most costly, 
the time periods being those with top ratings. The 2nd 
section has lower price & rating levels, but an advertiser 
may shift to the first section on 2 week’s notice. The 3rd 
section (low rates) buys are pre-emptible without notice 
for advertisers buying at the higher rates. The rate card 
was developed by Young-TV exec, vp James F. O’Grady Jr. 
The Katz agency’s new card is less of a precedent-setter. 
Chiefly, its change is one of simplification, standardized 
phraseology for conditions and purchase clauses, and a 
look-alike sequence of items on individual station cards — 
to save time-buyers the trouble of hunting all over a 
card to find elements used in station comparisons. The 
Katz card was announced by research & promotion assoc, 
dir. Kenneth Mills. 

Petroleum firms’ network & spot gross time billings 
in the first 9 months of 1960 were $29,987,440 (vs. $23,- 
552,711 for same ’59 period). Of the 20 largest producers, 
TvB reports, 11 spent at least 30% of their ad budgets on 
TV in 1959. Sales figures available for 10 companies in the 
first 6 months of 1960 showed an increase of 3.4% (vs. 
1.2% for the others, who put less than 30% in TV). 
Texaco was the leading TV advertiser in this year’s first 
9 months, with $9.5 million in gross time billings, followed 
by Esso Standard Oil with $2.4 million. 

■ 

Ad Peopie: Edward M. Thiele elected an exec, vp, Leo 

Burnett; John C. Ianiri, elected a vp . . . John F. Devine 
elected gen. counsel, J. Walter Thompson . . . Robert P. 
Engelke elected a vp & associate media dir., Ted Bates . . . 
George H. Alarik, Harold C. Mullen, Dean W. Proctor, 
Donald M. Rowe elected BBDO vps . . . Edward Battey, 
Theodore Gleysteen, John A. Hise, Frank Kemp, John Owen 
and Lewis Titterton named senior vps & dirs., Compton. 



14 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



Networks 

CBS was again on top in the first of Nielsen’s Dec. 
1960 NTI reports, a win considered meaningful by re- 
searchers since it reflects “regular” (i.e., free of election 
coverage etc.) programming. In nighttime A A ratings 
(Sun. 6:30-11, Mon.-Sat. 7:30-11 p.m.) CBS drew 20.3. 
ABC, previously in 3rd place (Vol. 16:51 p6), moved into 
2nd place with a 19.5 to rival CBS closely. NBC showed 
with a 17.4. The ratings also reflected an interesting growth 
pattern, now likely to level off somewhat as ABC reaches 
full status as a nighttime competitor. Since the year-ago 
rating, ABC has increased its homes-reached average by 
15%, while CBS increased 4% and NBC grew 1%. As has 
happened before, ABC took top honors in Nielsen’s 24-city 
report for the week ended Dec. 18, drawing a 20.0 against 
19.6 for CBS and 17.3 for NBC. 



NETWORK SALES ACTIVITY 



ABC-TV 

Naked City, Wed. 10-11 p.m.; Cheyenne, Mon. 7:30-8:30 
p.m.; Islanders, Sun. 9:30-10:30 p.m.; part, 
eff. spring & summer 1961 respectively. 
Union Carbide Consumer Products (Esty) 
Polk Miller Products (N. W. Ayer & Son) 

Roaring Twenties, Sat. 7:30-8:30 p.m.; Islanders, Sun. 9:30- 
10:30 p.m., participations eff. Jan. 

Simoniz (D-F-S) 

Action cartoon series, Mon.-Fri., 5:30-6 p.m., part. eff. Jan. 
American Home Products (Y&R) 

Adventures in Paradise, Mon. 9:30-10:30 p.m., part. eff. 
April. 

Union Carbide Consumer Products (Esty) 

American Bandstand, Mon.-Fri. 4-5:30 p.m.; daytime pro- 
gramming, Mon.-Fri., participations eff. Jan. 
Warner-Lambert (Lambert & Feasley) 

CRS-TV 

The Gunslinger, Thu. 9-10 p.m., participations eff. Feb. 9. 

R. J. Reynolds (William Esty) 

I Love Lucy, Sun. 6-6:30 p.m., participations eff. Jan. 1. 
Clairol (Foote, Cone & Belding) 

The Aquanauts, Wed. 7:30-8:30 p.m., part. eff. Jan. 4. 

Procter & Gamble (Benton & Bowles) 

NBC-TV 

Laramie, Tue. 7:30-8:30 p.m., participations eff. Jan. 

Gold Seal (Campbell-Mithun) 

Tall Man, Sat. 8:30-9 p.m., participations eff. Jan. 14. 
Block Drug (SSC&B) 

Laramie, Tue. 7:30-8:30 p.m.; Outlaws, Thu. 7:30-8:30 p.m., 
participations eff. Jan. 

Pepsi-Cola (BBDO) 

The Barbara Stanwyck Show, Mon. 10-10:30 p.m., renewal. 
American Gas (Lennen & Newell) 

The Tab Hunter Show, Sun. 8:30-9 p.m., renewal. 

P. Lorillard (Lennen & Newell) 

Daytime programming, Mon.-Fri., participations totaling 
$5.5 million eff. Jan. 

Colgate-Palmolive (Ted Bates) 

Simoniz (D-F-S) 

The Sweets Co. of America (Henry Eisen) 
Toni (North) 

Campana Sales (Erwin Wasey, R&R) 
Mentholatum (J. Walter Thompson) 

Mogan David Wine (Edward H. Weiss) 
Cracker Jack (Leo Burnett) 

Gold Seal (Campbell-Mithun) 

Dow Chemical (Norman Craig & Kummel) 



Television. Digest 

PUBLISHED BY TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. 

WALTER H. ANNENBERG, President 

PUBLICATION OFFICE Radnor, Pa., MUrray 8-3940, TWX: Radnor 1028 

JAMES T. QUIRK, MERRILL PANITT, Editorial Director 

Business Manager HAROLD B. CLEMENKO, Managing Editor 
DAVID LACHENBRUCH, Asst. Mng. Editor 
JAMES B. DELEHANTY, HAROLD RUSTEN, Associate Editor 

Asst. Business Mgr. PAUL STONE 



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Copyright 1961, by Triangle Publications, Inc. 



Personals: John Walsh, former CBS-TV special programs 

coordinator, appointed exec. dir. of National Academy of TV 
Arts & Sciences’ first international TV festival to be held 
in N.Y. & Washington in the fall of 1961. 

Frank Rogier named gen. sales mgr., Mutual Radio 
Network . . . James W. Dodd, ex-Screen Gems, named sales 
administration mgr., NBC International; Byron E. Goodell 
appointed Eastern div. sales mgr., NBC-TV Spot Sales . . . 
Daniel Denenholz, Katz Agency vp and research & promo- 
tion dir., elected secy.; Stanley Reulman, mgr. of San Fran- 
cisco office, named a vp. 

Harold E. (Hal) King named mgr. of upcoming KFOY- 
TV Hot Sprinks, Ark., due on air in early 1961 . . . Paul 
McDonough, asst, to FCC Chmn., shifts to general counsel’s 
office, assigned to space communications. 

Keith G. Dare, ex-WHCT Hartford, appointed sales 
mgr., WNBF-TV Binghamton, N.Y. . . . Sidney P. Allen 
appointed national sales mgr., CKLW-TV Detroit-Windsor, 
headquartering in N.Y. . . . John A. Dobson, sales mgr., 
WCAX-TV Burlington, Vt., elected a vp. 

Edwin K. Wheeler, gen. mgr., WWJ-TV & WWJ 
Detroit, appointed to Businessmen’s Advisory Committee, 
Wayne State U. School of Business Administration. 

Born Dec. 26 to Mr. & Mrs. William Sarnoff : a daugh- 
ter, Nancy Lynn, first grandniece of Brig. Gen. and Mrs. 
David Sarnoff. 

Obituary 

Tracy S. McCraken, 66, Wyo. newspaper publisher & 
Democratic National Committeeman, whose family inter- 
ests included broadcasting, died Dec. 26 in Laramie County 
Memorial Hospital, Cheyenne, following a heart attack on 
Christmas Day. He owned 4.42% of KFBC-TV & KFBC 
Cheyenne and satellite KSTF Scottsbluff, Neb. Other hold- 
ings by the family & associates: radios KVRS Rock Springs, 
Wyo.; KSID Sidney, Neb.; KRAL Rawlins, Wyo. 

Frederick A. Knorr, 47, Mich, radio station operator, 
died Dec. 26 in Ft. Lauderdale of burns received when he 
fell into scalding water Dec. 9 (Vol. 16:51 pll). He is 
survived by his wife, 2 daughters, a son and his parents. 

Charles S. Monroe, 52, CBS-TV advertising & sales 
promotion dept, administrative services mgr., died suddenly 
Dec. 24 at his home in Forest Hills. He wrote many CBS- 
TV & radio scripts. His wife, daughter & mother survive. 




VOI.. 17: No. 1 




MANUFACTURING, DISTRIBUTION, FINANCE 



TV TRADE TRENDS — PRICING & WARRANTIES: First clues to changes in pricing & 
warranty policies came from 3 manufacturers at week's end, in advance of the International Home Furnish- 
ings Show which opens its 10-day stand Jan. 6 at Chicago's Merchandise Mart. 

Topping pricing news were movements both up & down — up by Zenith & down by GE, though the 
latter's move seemingly involves only one new portable. Warranty news was made by Philco's new nation- 
wide 90-day parts-&-labor guarantee. 

Zenith distributors last week were showing dealers a revamped 58-model TV-stereo line which made 
good on Zenith Sales Corp. Pres. Leonard C. Truesdell's Oct. prediction of ''an increase in prices of a number 
of models" (Vol. 16:42 pl7). As we observed price tags at N.Y. distributor's show, suggested lists of many 
holdover TV models were up — most of them by $10, although increases appeared to range from $5 to $25. 

In Zenith's stereo line, several sets carry higher retail prices — the increment ranging from $10 on a 
low-end portable (now $89.95) to $50 on a $550 FM-AM-phono console. In addition, Zenith introduced a new 
super-sensitive timer and its own-make stereo changer — incorporated into several brand-new sets. (For 
details on Zenith line, see p. 18.) 

GE will show new low-priced slim 19-in. portable at Chicago market. Now in production and due 
for national distribution within few weeks, it's called GE's "first 1962 set." At $159.95, it appears to be lowest- 
priced big-name transformer-powered set with 19-in. 114-degree tube. Plastic-encased set is 12 Vi -in. deep at 
bottom, tapers to top, has AGC, width control, carrying handle. Step-up models are in $169.95 range. 

Philco retail prices also will rise — by at least $1.75 for portables and $4 for all other models. These 
increases represent costs of Philco's new inboard parts-&-labor warranty — costs which "are over & above 
the suggested list prices of the products," but which will be ticketed to consumer as part of over-all TV-set 
price. For more on Philco's labor warranty, see p. 17. 

FM STEREO STANDARDS THIS MONTH? FCC held its first meeting on stereo FM multiplex 
broadcasting last week — and afterwards Commissioners limited their comments to the hope that a decision 
would be made soon. There are indications that Commission is aiming at decision by end of this month. 

Four Commissioners were present — Chmn. Ford, Bartley, Craven, Hyde. They got rundown on ABCs 
of FM stereo from Harold L. Kassens, chief of aural existing facilities branch, in charge of stereo proceeding 
at staff level. Then they listened to tapes recorded during National Stereo Radio Committee's field tests 
last summer, containing monophonic & stereo output of each system. 

It was basically an orientation session . As among the 6 systems under consideration, it's understood 
that no staff recommendations have yet been drafted — and there's still possibility, of course, that Commission 
could decide not to choose any system. But best guess is that definite stereo FM standards will be established. 

"We hope to reach an early conclusion, " Chmn. Ford told us after session. Comr. Bartley, whose 
interest in both FM & stereo is of long standing and who attended some of last summer's field tests, expressed 
belief that "there'll be something before spring." 

TV-RADIO PRODUCTION: EIA statistics for week ended Dec. 23 (51st week of 1960): 

Dec. 16-23 Preceding wk. 1959 wk. ’60 cumulative ’59 cumulative 



TV 81,762 98,083 103,342 5,684,757 6,272,488 

Total radio 271,255 347,572 278,550 17,008,069 15,403,054 

auto radio 91,631 111,712 130,156 6,344,079 5,460,238 



16 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



1961 — ANOTHER RECORD, COMPETITIVE YEAR: It's going to be a bright year for 
those who can stand the pace. That's the way we see 1961 — a record year in consumer-electronics dollar 
sales, a hotly competitive year, a year when efficient organization, selling ability and honest value will 
count more than ever before. It won t blaze any new trails from standpoint of industry-wide profits, but 
firms with good management will be able to present satisfying reports to their stockholders. 

You've read industry leaders' cautious forecasts in these columns last week (Vol. 16:52 pl9). There 
is virtual unanimity that 1961 will start at a pace substantially slower than I960, pick up velocity at midyear, 
with 3rd & 4th guarters better than last year's corresponding ones. This, of course, spells higher dollar sales, 
since greater proportion of higher-priced merchandise traditionally is sold in year's 2nd half. We'll go a little 
further and predict higher unit sales of TVs & phonos, and at least a dollar increase in radio sales. 

Inventories will be watched more closely than ever before — nobody will want to take off on the 
overproduction toboggan. We see TV production, distributor & retail sales all hovering around 6-million 
mark this year (up from 5.7-to-5.8 million in all categories last year), phono retail sales nearly 5 million (vs. 
4.5 million), radios 10-to-10.5 million (vs. 10.2 million), auto radios close to 6 million (vs. 6.5 million). 

By year's end a new product will be revitalizing both the radio & console stereo markets, with a 2nd 
innovation poised in attempt to obsolete the phonograph as we know it today. FM multiplex stereocasting 
could begin around midyear and by Christmas season give big boost to both radio & stereo-phono sales. At 
year's end, hottest industry issue may be 3M's bid to obsolete the phonograph with its tiny automatic -chang- 
ing tape cartridge. 

In more detail, here's size-up of '61 as it looks from way out on our limb of the electronics tree: 

TV Soles Trends: Product upgrading will continue — with more emphasis on furniture styling, 
high-end sets, etc. Accordingly, average factory price of TV set sold in 1961 will rise to about $150, highest 
since 1953, up from low of $127 (1956) and from last year's estimated $146. TV-phono combinations will 
comprise a record 5% of retail sales (up from 3.7% last year), other consoles remaining at 45%, table models 
& portables dropping to 50% (from 51.3%). 

Technical Innovations: "The big change" — to 19- & 23-in. sets— came last year. This year's 
changes will be less noticeable in the showroom and aimed primarily at consumer satisfaction. One trend 
was foreshadowed by RCA Victor's introduction of sensitive New Vista tuner last year — and followed just 
last week by Zenith's Gold Video Guard tuner. More sensitive sets, lower noise levels, are good selling 
points — and good hedge in event industry must change over to uhf. Hot battle over picture-tube implosion 
shields will continue, first sets using du Pont Mylar shields and Pittsburgh laminated caps appearing in 1961. 

TV Merchandising Trends: Set makers will walk tightrope in attempt to reassure consumers 
on set reliability and at same time avoid offending service technicians. New warranty plans — some includ- 
ing parts and labor (see Philco story, p. 17), others extending to one or 2 years — will be tested & adopted. 

Another trend may be apparent by year's end — talk about discontinuance of annual model changes. 
This will be influenced less by George Romney & Vance Packard than by desire to end price-cut dumps & 
unnecessary retooling. 

Color TV: Even though Gen. Sarnoff stated last week that his company made profit "in 7 figures" 
on color in 1960, color will continue to be primarily RCA's baby. We think industry color sales, stimulated 
by an exceptionally good color set this year, will increase by 50% from an estimated 150,000 sets in 1960 
(which in turn was 30% above 1959) to about 225,000, in 1961. 

Radio Sales: FCC-established FM stereo mutiplex standards (see p. 15) will help increase dollar 
volume of radio sales and give U.S. manufacturers a unigue product not being made in any other country. 
In transistor radio field, more set makers will offer U.S.-made receivers priced competitively with imports, 
although total radio sales still may not come up to 1960's unit total. 

FM Radio: Public will purchase record number of FM receivers & timing devices. Including not 
only table radios, but combinations, hi-fi tuners & imports, FM will increase its U.S. audience by about 2.5 
million sets, compared with some 2 million last year. Toward end of year, many of these will be multiplex 
sets (unless there's hold-up in FCC decision), although really low-priced stereo radios won't generally be 
available until 1962. 

Phono Trends: Phono mix will continue in 1960 pattern — about 75% stereo, 25% mono. But toward 
year's end, influence of FCC stereo decision should be felt and nearly all stereo phonos sold will be eguipped 



VOL. 17: No. 1 



17 



with FM tuners — either already adapted or easily adaptable to FM multiplex stereo. Market will develop 
for FM stereo tuner converters for existing stereo phonos. We predict sale, under impact of this FM-stereo 
development, of some 5 million phonos at retail next year. 

Tape Cartridges: The tiny Minnesota Mining CBS tape cartridges — the 3^2 -in. square, 5/16-in. 
thick wafers which can provide up to 64 min. of stero music (Vol. 16:13 pi 8) — will be in at least experimental 
production by year's end, and 3M's Revere subsidiary will be manufacturing automatic players for them. 
Zenith, Columbia, Revere & others will be ready for marketing of stereo units containing the new cartridge 
changers, and predictions will be heard that at last tape is ready to obsolete the disc record. 

Imports: This year will be first big year for TV imports. They'll still number less than 2% of 
retail sales — about 100,000 units. Most will be from Japan, some from Germany. Majority will be 19-in. 
non-transistorized units; battery portables won't make much impact here in 1961. Radio imports will continue 
at approximately 1960's level (7.5 million, including 1- & 2-transistor "toys"), with no successful federal legis- 
lation to stop them. Tape recorder & stereo phono imports from Japan will soar. 

Those are 1961's prospects as we see them. It will be a year with plenty of opportunity, with high 
stakes for those who guess right, extreme dangers for those who can't keep pace. Public will have the 
money to buy, plenty of old sets to replace, and there'll be enticing new products on the market. Summing 
up in a single word the challenge of 1961: Salesmanship. 



1 More about 

PHILCO’S LABOR WARRANTY: “Unprecedented" is Phil- 

co’s description of its new nation-wide TV service 
policy (see p. 15) that guarantees service labor as well 
as parts during the 90-day warranty period. The policy 
becomes effective with the new Philco TVs, which are 
being introduced to dealers this week at simultaneous 
conventions in Miami Beach & Las Vegas. 

Philco portables will be sold with a built-in policy pro- 
viding “carry-in" service. Table models, compacts and con- 
soles will be covered with in-the-home service. The costs 
of these inboard service policies, Philco candidly states, are 
$1.75 & $4 respectively. However, the policies are not 
optional for consumer, dealer or distributor. Accordingly, 
the price the consumer pays for his new Philco TV auto- 
matically will include the labor warranty. 

Henry T. Paiste, Philco’s consumer-relations & service 
dir., says the TV policy was field-tested in Chicago, Mil- 
waukee and Cincinnati and is patterned after the company’s 
labor-&-parts warranty for 1 ‘adios, introduced in 1955. 

The contract servicing, he explains, will be provided 
by more than 30,000 independent Philco servicemen, thou- 
sands of Philco dealers with “qualified” service shops & 
technicians, and independent non-retailing servicemen who 
do servicing for non-servicing TV retailers. 

Paiste told us that the serviceman will bill Philco at 
virtually “full rate” for labor-&-parts repairs and will make 
just about the same profit as he would if the TV set owner 
walked into the shop cold for the same repair. 

“This labor & parts warranty,” he told us, “is designed 
for satisfaction. It assures the customer complete service 
protection during warranty, it furnishes the serviceman 
with a proper profit on his work, it brings him additional 
business both during the warranty period and after. Philco 
sees this as a major step in bringing about a much needed 
uniform service coverage for the entire service industry.” 
ranties on a local level.” 

* * * 

Westinghouse’s 90-day labor-&-parts warranty on all 
19-in. portable TVs became effective Jan. 1. TV-hi-fi dept, 
mgr. J. J. Egan noted: “Previously, some Westinghouse 
distributors & dealers had offered free labor-&-parts war- 
ranties on a local level.” 



GALVIN & SKINNER SEE GOOD ’61: The presidents of 2 
large consumer-electronics manufacturing firms both 
see 1961 business as at least equal to 1960’s thanks to 
an anticipated 2nd-half pickup. Philco’s James M. 
Skinner Jr. & Motorola’s Robert W. Galvin thus add 
their opinions to those of other industry leaders quoted 
in our annual roundup last week (Vol. 16:52 pl9). 

Galvin’s statement: “It is likely that the sale of high- 
ticket consumer-products items, which were comparatively 
high in the first half of 1960, will be at a reduced level 
during the same period of 1961, but we can expect improve- 
ment in the last half of 1961 compared with 1960. The total 
volume should be approximately the same. 

“We expect that a number of factors will accumulate 
to make the 2nd half of 1961 a brisk marketing period: 
Renewed confidence, particularly on the part of the 66 
million people who were never out of a job during the 
recession . . . accumulated savings . . . and the fact that 
more than enough time will have passed during which 
people have been unduly postponing their replacement 
purchases. This, combined with some attractive new prod- 
uct features to be available, will nurture the market. 

“Other radio products will be up in the 2nd half of 
next year, after a somewhat lower first half than 1960, 
to the extent that we believe 1961 will show a gain over 
1960. Car radio sales volume may be down slightly next 
year from the excellent output in 1960.” 

Skinner’s statement: “. . . We expect the industry to 
[have] an improved 2nd half; end the year with rising sales. 

“Sales of home electronic products probably will start 
slowly during the early months of 1961, and show improve- 
ment during the middle quarters and particularly in the 
4th quarter. Sales of all types of phonographs & TV should 
show a tendency to firm up in the coming year, particularly 
as the symptoms of the present mild recession disappear. 
Foi'tunately, the predicted upturn of the economy in mid- 
year will coincide with the beginning of TV’s traditional 
season of high sales. Radio, however, will continue as a 
steady business throughout the year under the impetus of 
strong consumer demand for transistorized models . . . 

“As a whole, then, we expect the economy to gain new 
strength in the last half of 1961, bring sales for the year to 
levels equal to 1960, with a chance for a modest increase.” 



18 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



More about 



NEW MODEL SETS: New TV, radio & stereo instru- 

ments will formally be unveiled at the International 
Home Furnishings Show which starts this week (Jan. 
9) at Chicago’s Merchandise Mart, but many distribu- 
tors were giving dealers a look at them last week in 
private showings. In addition to the new price & war- 
ranty trends of Zenith, GE & Philco (see p. 15), here 
are some of the highlights : 

Zenith — Several new innovations are found in Zenith’s 
long line. A new super-sensitive tuner in 19 basic models 
— including portables, table models, consoles & combina- 
tions — has been named “Gold Video Guard.” The new tur- 
ret tuner has “104 contact points made of 16K filled gold, 
alloyed with platinum & silver.” Hand wired, it’s designed 
to minimize contact wear, is built to accommodate up to 4 
uhf strips. It features a front-of-set fine-tuning control 
which may be used by the set owner to peak-tune each chan- 
nel — and adjustments can be readily made without upset- 
ting tuning of any other channel. 

One of the most interesting features of the Zenith line 
is the addition of DC restoration to high-end TV models. 
This technique, long known to the industry, but not used 
recently by any other manufacturer to our knowledge, 
sharply improves contrast and prevents wash-out of details. 
Called “Dynamic Contrast Control” by Zenith, it may be 
engaged or disengaged by means of a push-pull switch 
under the hinged escutcheon panel. 

Zenith also showed for the first time its “Stereo Pro- 
fessional” changer, featured in 6 stereo consoles and one 
TV combination. Built by Zenith — the first changer it has 
made itself in several years — it features precision construc- 
tion designed to minimize rumble, wow & flutter. An inter- 
esting feature is a pop-up 45-rpm spindle which folds right 
into the turntable. 

The new Zenith TV line includes 39 basic models, 19 of 
them with remote control. Stereo line has 3 portables & 16 
single-cabinet consoles, 5 with “extended stereo” & reverb. 

Olympic — Six new TV models, 2 stereos & 4 radios will 
be added, all of them promotionally priced. The TV line 
includes a 19-in. TV-radio-phono combination at $249.95, a 
23-in. combination at $389.95, a 23-in. console at $249.95, 
a 23-in. table model at $199.95 and an open-priced 19-in. 
portable. Stereo consoles are priced from $129.95 without 
radio and $199.95 with AM-FM. Featured in the radio line 
is an AM-FM table model at $29.95, a 6-transistor pocket 
set, a 5-tube clock radio and a 5-tube radio, the latter 3 
with open list. Olympic’s display will be at Chicago’s Con- 
gress Hotel Jan. 6-12. 

Webcor — To be shown at regional distributor meetings 
beginning Jan. 5 (Chicago) will be these new products: (1) 
“Galaxy” stereo phono-tape recorder-AM-FM console to re- 
tail at about $1,000. (2) “The industry’s smallest AM-FM 
radio, transistorized down to one-fourth the size of the next 
larger competitor.” (3) A cordless big-speaker AM radio 
said to operate more inexpensively than a power-cord unit. 
(4) A 9-transistor citizens band transceiver. 



TV-radio-phono excise tax rules, revised to bring them 
into line with technical changes in the 1958 Excise Tax Act 
(Vol. 16:2 p21), have been put into final form by Internal 
Revenue Service. The text of the rewritten regulations, 
which retain the 10% manufacturer’s tax on sets, is pub- 
lished in the Dec. 19 Internal Revenue Bulletin, available 
from IRS offices. 



OCT. PHONO SALES DIVE: Retail phono sales in October 
1960 were the best since February — but not good 
enough to maintain 1959’s pace. Following the decline 
trend which began in the preceding month (when retail 
sales were 3% lower than Sept. 1959), October’s retail 
sales dipped 19% below Oct. 1959’s figure. 

Cumulative retail sales for 1960’s first 10 months were 
still 10% ahead of the same 1959 period, thanks to the 
substantial lead chalked up in the first 8 months of the 
year. However, if retail sales in November & December 
followed the October pattern (official figures not yet avail- 
able), they pulled 1960 unit sales down to the same level 
as full-year 1959 — about 4.4 million units. 

Of course, unit sales don’t tell the full story. Dollar 
sales volume in 1960 was considerably ahead of 1959 — 
largely because full-year retail phono sales for 1960 con- 
sisted of an estimated 75% stereo units vs. 62% in 1959. 

Factory sales of phonos were 14% below Oct. 1959 in 
Oct. 1960, while 10-month factory unit sales were 18% 
higher than during the same 1959 period. The official EIA 
phono sales figures for 1960’s first 10 months as compared 
with the corresponding 1959 months: 

PHONO FACTORY SALES 

1960 1959 



Month Mono Stereo Total Mono Stereo Total 

January 118,400 341,329 459,729 184,147 177,336 361,483 

February 92,649 324,666 417,315 164,873 188,760 353,623 

March 63,264 242,523 305,787 119,075 168,117 287,192 

April 30,962 142,409 173,371 47,153 125,111 172,264 

May 36,793 146,176 182,962 33,356 89,827 123,183 

June 69,293 198,407 267,700 44,976 152,900 197,876 

July 70,992 222,559 293,551 44,591 168,668 203,259 

August 109,321 307,517 410,838 65,179 277,545 342,724 

September 146,997 384,289 531,286 102,399 377,785 480,184 

October 143,160 391,821 514,980 139,579 456,471 696,050 



TOTAL 881,831 2,701,696 3,583,527 945,328 2,172,510 3,117,838 

PHONO RETAIL SALES 

1960 1959 

Month Mono Stereo Total Mono Stereo Total 

January 150,688 368,964 449,923 231,429 159,214 390,643 

February 102,063 347,860 448,128 171,127 156,477 327,604 

March 61,249 249,497 310,746 139,677 140,075 279,662 

April 41,503 152,141 193,644 94,226 118,197 212,423 

May 39,734 141,080 180,814 70,228 82,765 152,993 

June 44,925 166,339 210,264 66,979 100,982 167,961 

July 68,787 180,949 239,736 82,742 124,979 207,721 

August 79,364 257,581 336,945 98,132 198,926 297,068 

September 115,863 264,636 380,499 132,686 257,857 390,543 

October 126,807 272,101 398,908 152,248 343,428 495,676 



TOTAL 820,983 2,400,148 3,221,131 1,239,374 1,682,900 2,922,274 



* * * 

Transistor sales at the factory level passed the 100- 
million mark in October, remaining above 12 million for 
the 2nd consecutive month, EIA figures show. The total 
for all of 1959 was 82 million. Transistor factory-sales 
dollar volume for October totaled $25.9 million, down 
slightly from September, as were unit sales. Here are EIA’s 
10-month factory figures, with 1959 comparisons: 

I960 1959 

Units Dollars Units Dollars 



January 9,606,630 $24,714,580 5,195,317 $13,243,224 

February 9,527,662 24,831,570 6,393,377 14,550,056 

March 12,021,506 28,700,129 6,310,286 18,117,660 

April 9,891,236 23,198,576 6,906,736 16,864,049 

May 9,046,237 24,714,580 6,358,097 19,007,293 

June 10,392,412 27,341,733 6,934,213 18,031,693 

July 7,070,884 18,083,802 6,030,265 16,618,315 

August 9,732,993 22,739,969 7,129,696 18,854,138 

September 12,973,792 28,442,229 8,662,526 20,861,290 

October 12,168,632 25,945,195 8,710,913 22,109,748 



TOTAL 102,431,984 $248,144,156 74,467,926 $199,189,791 



Division to conduct research on ceramic ferrite & other 
semiconductor materials has been formed by Conductron, 
subsidiary of Paramount Pictures’ Autometric Corp. 

Capitol Records has formed a home-instruments div. to 
design, make and sell Capitol portable & console phonos. 



VOL. 17: No. 1 



19 



Trade Personals: Ross Snyder, ex-mgr. Ampex Profes- 

sional Products video products dept., named staff asst, to 
mktg. div. dir., Eitel-McCullough . . . L. I. Wood named GE 
vp, gen. counsel & secy., succeeding Ray H. Luebbe, retir- 
ing ... I. Nevin Palley named pres, of ITT Federal Labs, 
new div. comprising former ITT Labs and ITT Federal div. 

. . . John B. Tuthill named finance vp, W. W. Roodhouse, 
administration vp, Collins Radio. 

George T. Stewart named Eastern region sales vp, 
Sylvania Home Electronics; Austin J. White appointed 
Midwestern sales vp . . . Robert M. Carstens promoted to 
asst, sales mgr., Zenith Sales Corp. international div. . . . 
Robert M. Jones promoted to personnel vp, Philco, succeed- 
ing Harold W. Butler, who resigned as an officer but con- 
tinues as a dir. & exec, committee member . . . Allen Cen- 
ter, who rejoined Motorola Jan. 1 (Vol. 16:47 p21), elected 
PR vp . . . Robert W. Pemberton named regional sales mgr., 
Stromberg-Carlson consumer products Midwest territory. 

Ben Zale named ad mgr., Rek-O-Kut . . . Warren R. 
Baughman named permanent magnets sales mgr., Indiana 
General’s Indiana Steel Products div. . . . Peter Bas named 
mgr., entertainment semiconductor, tube & component 
dept., in a split of Philips Electronics Industries’ Rogers 
Electronic Tubes & Components into 2 separate depts.; 
D. S. Simkins, appointed mgr., professional semiconductor, 
tube & component dept. . . . Dr. George Wetwijn named 
director of engineering at the Evanston, 111., plant of Hoff- 
man Electronics semiconductor division. 

Bernard Reich, formerly chief, circuit-functions branch 
of solid state-devices div., U.S. Army Signal Research & 
Development Labs, Fort Monmouth, N.J., named pres., 
Molecular Electronics, subsidiary of Precision Circuits . . . 
Harold A. Wheeler, Hazeltine vp, appointed to Defense 
Dept. Advisory Group on Radar. 

Frank H. Bower named to new post of research & de- 
velopment contracts mgr., Sylvania semiconductor div. . . . 
Charles R. Fisher named product engineering mgr., Strom- 
berg-Carlson telecommunication div. . . . Palmer M. Craig, 
named operations dir., Philco Western Development Labs, 
Palo Alto . . . Nicholas F. Pensiero named mktg. admin, 
mgr., Philco Corp. computer div., govt. & industrial group. 

Meade C. Camp, ex-Univac div. of Sperry Rand, named 
mktg. planning mgr., RCA electronic data-processing div. 
. . . Robert C. Dunlap Jr. named a Texas Instruments vp, 
succeeding Fred J. Agnich, resigned. Dunlap will head the 
company’s geoscience activities, continuing as pres, of sub- 
sidiary Geophysical Service . . . David Lachenbruch pro- 
moted to asst, managing editor, Television Digest. 

— ■ 

George’s Radio & TV Co. Inc., big Washington discount 
house, has denied FTC charges that it made deceptive 
pricing & savings claims in advertising for appliances sold 
at its “warehouse supermarts.” The firm said the ads 
listed manufacturers’ “suggested retail prices,” and didn’t 
mislead buyers. Meanwhile, the govt, filed a suit for a 
$45,000 judgment against the company for alleged failure 
to comply with a 1954 cease-&-desist order against TV 
set-pricing practices which FTC said were deceptive. 
George’s Pres. George Wasserman should be assessed 
another $45,000 as an added penalty, the govt, said in the 
action instituted in U.S. District Court, Washington. 

Factory sales of appliances will rise 3.5% in 1961, 
compared with 1960’s 6.8% decline from a year ago, pre- 
dicts the consumer-products div. of the National Electrical 
Mfrs. Assn. These gains are anticipated (1960 losses in 
parentheses): electric refrigerators, 0.7% ( — 8.2%); food 
freezers, 5.3% ( — 13.3%); electric ranges, 4.9% ( — 9.6%). 



John V. L Hogan: John Vincent Lawless Hogan, 71, an 

engineering pioneer in radio, TV, facsimile & high-fidelity 
sound reproduction, died Dec. 29 at his home in Forest 
Hills, N.Y. after a long illness. Holder of many patents 
in these fields, and a consulting engineer until his recent 
illness, Hogan’s career paralleled the rise of electronics. 

In 1908, at 19, as chief lab assistant to Dr. Lee de 
Forest, he is credited with transmitting the first music by 
radiotelephone to be heard outside the laboratory (a 
wireless operator at Brooklyn Navy Yard heard it while 
listening for Morse code). During this time he invented 
the single-dial radio tuner as well as a crystal detector. 
In 1909 he joined the National Electric Signaling Co., 
becoming mgr. of Prof. R. A. Fessenden’s experimental 
trans-Atlantic station. He held several important com- 
mercial & govt, posts in World War I, after developing & 
receiving patents for a number of improvements in broad- 
casting & reception, particularly relating to sound fidelity. 

In 1921, he became a consulting engineer, continuing 
to experiment in radio — including such fields as TV, FM & 
facsimile. He served as an advisor to the Federal Radio 
Commission. He founded the experimental W2XR N.Y. in 
1928 in connection with experiments in high-fidelity sound 
for TV. The station later became commercial WQXR (pur- 
chased by N.Y. Times in 1944); he resigned as president 
of the station in 1949. During World War II, he concen- 
trated on military electronics research and served as 
special assistant to Dr. Vannevar Bush, director of the 
Office of Scientific Research & Development. He was 
president of Hogan Labs Inc. & Faximile Inc., was a 
founder & president (1920) of IRE. 

Finance 

Sprague Electric expects 1960 to produce peak earnings 
of $4.5 million ($3.25 a share) on record sales of $65 
million, compared with 1959’s profit of $3.5 million ($2.61) 
on $56.4-million sales. Chmn. Robert C. Sprague, in a re- 
cent N.Y. Times profile, noted that Sprague sales have ex- 
panded at an average rate of 16% annually during its first 
30 years (1926-1957), are expected to grow at a minimum 
average of 12% annually in the decade ending 1967. “In- 
creasing competition in the electronics business, both 
domestic & foreign,” he said, “requires the most astute 
business & financial judgment. At the same time, the 
future in electronics belongs to those companies that keep 
themselves in the technological forefront. We are strength- 
ening our board & our executive staff (Vol. 16:48 pl8) in 
both directions so that we will be prepared to continue, if 
not exceed, the rate of growth we have [had] in the past.” 

Thompson Ramo Wooldridge plans to buy Radio Con- 
denser Co., Camden, N.J., and has obtained an option to 
acquire more than 90% of the latter’s common. Wooldridge 
Pres. Dean. E. Wooldridge says that, subject to SEC 
approval, 103,463 shares of TRW common will be offered 
in exchange for 4,350,815 outstanding shares of Radio 
Condenser, on the basis of .2374 of a share for one of the 
Camden firm’s. 

Appliance Buyers Credit Corp. (jointly owned by RCA 
and Whirlpool) has completed arrangements for the private 
sale of $7.5 million of senior subordinated notes, due Dec. 
15, 1975. The St. Joseph, Mich, company furnishes financ- 
ing for dealers & distributors of RCA, Whirlpool and Car- 
rier products. 

Avnet Electronics was slated for listing on the New 
York Stock Exchange at year’s end, moving from the 
American. Symbol: AVT. 



20 



JANUARY 2, 1961 



Financial Reports of TV-Electronics Companies 

ThcM are latest reporta aa obtained daring the last week. Dash indicates the information was not available at press time. Parentheses denote loss. 



Company 


Period 


Sales 


Pre-Tax 

Earnings 


Net Earnings 


Per 

Common 

Share 


Common 

Shares 


Bendix 


1960 — year to Sept. 30 
1959 — year to Sept. 30 


$794,499,990 

691,511,604 


$54,028,270 

59,737,082 


$26,188,471 

27,404,274 


$4.88 

5.37 


5,371,278 

5,104,365 


Hallicrafters 


1960 — qtr. to Nov. 30 

1959 — qtr. to Nov. 30 


11,683,000 

7,891,000 




356.000 

273.000 


.32 

.24 


1,005,000 

1,005,000 


Heli-Coil 


1960 — 6 mo. to Oct. 31 

1959 — 6 mo. to Oct. 31 


3,648,181 

4,166,209 


979,429 

1,157,695 


475,229 

558,095 


.69 

.94 


685,611 

594,231 


International Electronic 
Research 


1960 — year to Sept. 30 
1959 — year to Sept. 30 


5,239,834 

4,357,671 




346,507 

167,194 


.75 

.36 


462,000 

462,000 


Newark Electronic 


1960 — qtr. to Nov. 30 
1959 — qtr. to Nov. 30 


3,435,000 

.2,797,000 




86,939 

58,237 


.27 

.18 




Yardney Electric 


1960 — 6 mo. to Oct. 31 
1959 — 6 mo. to Oct. 31 


4,797,554 

3,276,000 


— 


281,131 

209,000 


.28 

.20 





Storer Bcstg. Co. stockholders will put up 263,000 com- 
mon shares for public sale through an underwriting group 
headed by Reynolds & Co. Inc., according to an SEC regis- 
tration statement (File 2-17433). The price & underwriting- 
terms weren’t reported in the initial report to SEC. Storer 
Chmn.-Pres. George B. Storer will sell 160,000 shares; the 
Detroit Bank & Trust Co., as trustee under agreements 
with him, 50,000; senior vp. J. Harold Ryan & Mrs. Ryan 
(Storer’s sister), 50,000. All of the 263,000 common shares 
being offered (of a total of 975,060 outstanding) are shares 
into which a like number of Class B shares (1,499,690 
outstanding) will be converted. The SEC registration state- 
ment listed Chmn.-Pres. Storer as 72.38% owner of the 
Class B stock. 



OVER-THE-COUNTER 
COMMON STOCK QUOTATIONS 

Thursday, December 29, 1960 
Electronics TV-Radios-Appliances Amusements 



The following quotations, obtained in part from the National Asso- 
ciation of Securities Dealers Inc., do not represent actual transactions. 
They are intended as a guide to the approximate range urithin which 
these securities could have been bought or sold at time of compilation. 



Stock 


Bid Asked 


Stock 


Bid Asked 


Acoustica Associates - 


20-4 


22 


Magnetics Inc. _ 


7% 


8% 


Aerovox 


7% 


8% 


Maxson (W.L.) _ 


12 


13% 


Allied Radio 


22% 


24% 


Meredith Pub. 


42% 


45% 


Astron Corp. 


1% 


2% 


Metropolitan Bcstg. 


18% 


20% 


Baird Atomic 


24 % 


26% 


Milgo Electronics 


18% 


19% 


British Industries 


191/2 


21% 


Narda Microwave 


3 7 /a 


4% 


CGS Labs . . 


5 % 


7% 


Nuclear of Chicago 


37.% 


40% 


Cetron Electric 


4 Vs 


4% 


Official Films 


2 'A 


2% 


Control Data Corp. __ 


61% 


65% 


Pacific Automation 


5 


5% 


Cook Elec. . _ 


12% 


13% 


Pacific Mercury 


5 ‘A 


5% 


Craig Systems 


15 % 


16% 


Philips Lamp 


156% 


162% 


Dictaphone - 


2814 


30% 


Pyramid EHectric 


2% 


2% 




23% 


25% 


Radiation Inc. 


25 


27% 


Eastern Ind. 


14 


15% 


Howard W. Sams 


35% 


38% 


Eitel-McCulloUgh 


19 


20% 


Sanders Associates 


32% 


35% 


Elco Corp. 


1514 


16% 


Silicon Transistor 


3% 


4% 


Electro Instruments _ 


24% 


27% 


Soroban Engineering _ 


39 


42% 


Electro Voice 


7% 


8% 


Soundscriber 


15>A 


17 


Electronic Associates _ 


29 'A 


31% 


Speer Carbon 


17% 


19% 


Erie Resistor 


9% 


10 


Sprague Electric 


52 


55% 


Executone 


20% 


23 


Sterling TV 


1% 


2 


Farrington Mfg. 


28 '4 


30% 


Taft Bcstg. 


12 


13% 


FXR 


38% 


42 


Taylor Instrument 


34% 


37 


General Devices 


11% 


12% 


Technology Inst. 


8 


9 


G-L Electronics 


8 'A 


9% 


Tele-Broadcasters 


1 


1% 


Granco Products 


2% 


2 ’/a 


Telechrome 


12 


13% 


Gross Telecasting 


20 


22 


Telecomputing . _ 


7 


7% 




1/16 


14 


Telemeter 


12 


13 Vs 


Hewlett-Packard 


29% 


31% 


Time Inc. - — 


74% 


78% 


High Voltage Eng. 


153 


163 


Tracerlab _ - 


8% 


10 


Infrared Industries — 


17% 


1914 


United Artists _ — - 


5% 


6% 


Interstate Engineering 


21% 


28% 


United Control — 


17 


1874 


Itek 


50 


54 


Vitro _ 


10% 


11% 




6% 


7% 


Vocaline 


2% 


2% 


Lab for Electronics 


46% 


50% 


Wells-Gardner 


20% 


21% 


Magna Theater 


2% 


2% 


Wometco Ent. 


12% 


13% 



Reports & comments available: ITT, study, Evans & 
Co., 300 Park Ave., N.Y. 22 • Hallicrafters, analysis, 
William R. Staats & Co., Ill Sutter St., San Francisco 4 • 
Loral Electronics, prospectus, Kidder, Peabody & Co., 17 
Wall St., N.Y. 5 • American Cryogenics, prospectus, 

Courts & Co., 25 Broad St., N.Y. 4 • Educational Elec- 
tronics, report on General Electronic Labs, $1, Carleton & 
Co., 262 Washington St., Boston 8 • “Movie Makers Pros- 
per Again,” Hollywood profile in Dec. 14 Financial World. 

• Electronic Specialty, analysis, Dempsey-Tegeler & Co., 

210 W. 7th St., Los Angeles 14 • General Precision Equip- 
ment, report, Eastman Dillon, Union Securities & Co., 15 
Broad St., N.Y. 5 • Metropolitan Telecommunications, 

prospectus, Milton D. Blauner & Co., 115 Broadway, N.Y. 6 

• The Tele-Tronics Company, offering circular, Woodcock, 
Moyer, Fricke & French, 123 S. Broad St., Philadelphia 

• CBS, analysis, Goodbody & Co., 115 Broadway, N.Y. 6 • 
Rank Organization, study, Bache & Co., 36 Wall St., N.Y. 5. 

• Standard Kollsman Industries, analysis, H. Hentz & Co., 
72 Wall St., N.Y. 5. 

Mergers & acquisitions: Avnet Electronics, Westbury, 
N.Y. manufacturer of electronic components & devices, has 
merged with British Industries, N.Y.-based marketer of 
hi-fi & stereo equipment. Surviving Avnet will operate the 
latter as a subsidiary. British Industries stockholders will 
receive for each share one Avnet share plus a warrant 
exercisable for 30 days to purchase 2 Avnet shares for each 
5 BI shares • Electronic Specialty, which plans to consoli- 
date next month with American Electronics (Vol. 16:49 
p22), will merge first with D. S. Kennedy Co., subject to 
approval of latter’s stockholders. Kennedy, of Cohasset, 
Mass., produces antennas for space communications & 
missile detection, employs some 500 persons in 4 plants 
(Ala., Tex., Ia., Mass.). The combination of Electronic 
Specialty (including D. S. Kennedy) and American Elec- 
tronics is to be known as Electronic Science & Controls Inc., 
if stockholders of both approve the merger • Bedford 
Blanket, New Bedford, Mass, maker of electric blankets, 
reports it has merged with Standard Kollsman, which 
recently acquired the electric blanket div. of Bobrich 
Products (Vol. 16:51 pl3). 



Common Stock Dividends 



Stk. of 

Corporation Period Amt. Payable Record 

A. C. Nielsen Q $0.12% Feb. 1 Jan. 6 

Packard Bell Q .12% Jan. 25 Jan. 10 



WEEKLY 



Television Digest 



JANUARY 9, 1961 



© 1961 TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. ' 



VOL. 17: No. 2 

DV 



The authoritative service for executives in all branches of the television arts & industries 



SUMMARY-INDEX OF WEEK'S NEWS 



FCC 

ALLOCATIONS COMMENTS — more of the same — turn up in form 
I of 160 replies on interim vhf drop-in proposal. FCC is seen 
adopting less than dozen (p. 1). 

FCC PONDERS PAYOFF RULES, drafting changes to reflect the 
Harris-Pastore amendments that require closer, case-by-case Com- 
] mission scrutiny (p. 6). 

Congress 

OVERSIGHTERS SHUT UP SHOP fighting among themselves, but 
[ they agree on need for more TV-radio-FCC reforms — and opposi- 
tion to Landis plan. Bills pour into House (pp. 2 & 3). 

SEC. 315 "WATCHDOG" HEARING to follow inauguration, is set 
by Senate's Yarborough subcommittee. "Representative" equal- 
time complaints will be explored (p. 4). 

Stations 

EXPANDED TELEVISION FACTBOOK, due April 15, will offer such 

I unique services as complete data from ARB's 1960 station-cover- 
age report, and exact scale reproductions of all station contour 
! maps as filed with FCC (p. 3). 

WHAT IS THE PUBLIC INTEREST? Comr. King's question arouses 
us to make a 3-city survey. New York and Los Angeles attempt 
answers — but not Washington (p. 5). 

Film Tape 

BING CROSBY PRODUCTIONS is being reactivated; seeking pro- 
duction & investment opportunities (p. 11). 



M 9 7361 

Consumer Electronics 

TRADE & BUSINESS TRENDS at market time: Low-end prices 
are dropping, middle-of-line are firm to high; more sensitive 
tuners; picture-tube dispute (p. 14). 

TV & RADIO SALES ARE DOWN at retail in November, marking 
radio's first drop of 1960. Eleven-month retail figures indicate 
1960 TV sales were extremely close to 1959's (p. 16). 

TV EXPORTS ROSE to 12,000 sets & chassis in September, Com- 
merce Dept, estimates in electronics export-import tally (p. 16). 

TUBE TRENDS FOR 1961, as forecast by GE's Davis: More 92- 
degree sets, "integral implosion protection" (p. 17). 

NEW SETS INTRODUCED by Philco, Motorola, GE, Sylvania & 
Du Mont for winter market (p. 17). 

WORLDWIDE COLOR TV via space satellite at 1964 World's Fair 
predicted by Sarnoff. RCA dealers pledge color sales (pp. 15 & 18). 

Advertising 

BUSINESS IS LOCAL even in national brands, say studies by 
Westinghouse and Corinthian. They show important variations 
in buying habits between markets & within markets (p. 7). 

TOY MFRS. WARNED by toy adman William Silverstein of Aurora 
Plastics that unreality in TV toy commercials may create lasting 
resentment. But his firm — and others — plan lots more TV (p. 8). 

Other Departments 

AUXILIARY SERVICES (p. 9). PROGRAMMING (p. 10). ETV (p. 12). 
PERSONALS (p. 13). NETWORKS (p. 14). FINANCE (p. 20). 



ALLOCATION COMMENTS — MORE OF THE SAME: FCC has last big cud to chew on in 

its interim allocation plan proposal (Vol. 16:40 p2) — in the form of about 160 reply comments on the short- 
spaced vhf drop-in concept. 

A quick scan of the comments shows them to be more of the same — as the original comments. The 
"haves” either flatly oppose any mileage cuts, or they urge severe limitations. The "have nots" insist that 
their communities must have more competition — and mileage cuts are the only answer. 

Gauging FCC, we judge it will finally come up with a few mileage-cut drop-ins — less than a dozen — 
plus a half-dozen or so "move-ins." The latter would cut mileages to permit existing stations or channel assign- 
ments to come closer to principal cities they're intended to serve. We see the Commission rejecting the vast 
majority of proposed drop-ins — many for smaller communities — which have been suggested even though the 
Commission didn't ask for any. 

ABC & AMST epitomized the conflicting forces, and many of their comments were directed at each 
other. ABC said that AMST's objective is simply to prevent & delay establishment of competing stations. 
AMST said that ABC would destroy rural service to get a few more full-time affiliates — and that it is going to 
get the affiliates in most important markets, anyway, through full-spaced drop-ins. 

FCC continues working, meanwhile, on a long-range allocations policy. There's still every indication 
that all-channel-set legislation is the keystone, supported by efforts to make uhf more viable (Vol. 16:49 p4, et 
seq.). Recommendations to Congress are expected within next month or two. 



2 



JANUARY 9, 1961 



OVERSIGHTERS SHUT UP SHOP: With characteristic controversy & confusion, House 

Commerce Legislative Oversight Subcommittee headed by Rep. Harris (D-Ark.) officially went out of business 
Jan. 3, after nearly 4 years of headlined hearings which gave broadcasting & FCC their roughest time. 

TV-radio-FCC sighs of relief over demise may be premature , however. Harris isn't through, and 
neither is his Commerce Committee. Even as he formally closed shutters on the special Oversight unit with 
an 84-page final report (Rept. No. 2238), he hung up notice of a plan to start up again with a new (& regular) 
Subcommittee on Regulatory & Administrative Commissions. It would ride herd on FCC & other agencies. 

Internal bickering & public disputes marked close of Oversight Subcommittee's Congressional life 
as they did its start, when chief counsel Bernard Schwartz was fired, accusing Harris of "whitewashing" FCC. 
This time the charge of "incredible whitewash" was hurled at the Democratic majority by Republicans on the 
Subcommittee. They disowned staff report (Vol. 16:52 p2) which was the basis of the Subcommittee report, 
called it "unfair, unjudicial and beneath the dignity of a Congressional committee. Republicans' ire was 
brought on particularly by the majority's "shocking" exoneration of ex-New Deal braintruster Thomas G. 
Corcoran of any wrongdoing in an FPC case investigated by the Subcommittee. 

There was no Republican dissent, however, from other major findings & recommendations in the final 
report dealing with broadcasters & FCC. The report repeated staff conclusions that more must be done to 
bar backdoor approaches to FCC & other agencies; that networks should be regulated or licensed by FCC; and 
that trafficking in station licenses must be halted. Harris promptly introduced legislation carrying out the 
recommendations, adding a handful of bills to those overflowing the House hopper during the opening week 
of the 87th Congress (see opposite page). 

Subcommittee also challenged James M. Landis & his reform proposal to President-elect Kennedy 
that the White House take on over-all policy control of the agencies (Vol. 17:1 pi). Overseeing agencies is a 
primary job of Congress, not the White House, the report said in its final paragraph — which was tacked on to 
the staff's language after the Landis recommendations were released. 

"It would be tragic to have a conflict develop between the Executive & Congress over the question of 
which branch has supreme control over the federal agencies," Harris & his colleagues (Democrats & 
Republicans alike) warned. Reflecting the traditional Congressional resentment of any White House action to 
move in on territory legislators regard as their own, the report went on: 

"In this field it must be recognized that the agencies exercise powers delegated to them by Congress, 
and that Congress has the Constitutional responsibility of supervising & overseeing their operations." The 
Subcommittee conceded that the President has responsibilities for agencies, too, and that "watertight com- 
partments" of jurisdiction shouldn't be maintained. It called for "accommodation" between the 2 branches 
of govt, on agency problems, and said the proposed new Subcommittee would "provide a modus operandi 
for such constructive effort" by Congress. 

Harris reform bills started meanwhile, down legislative path . Reworked from old bills drafted by 
Harris which had never reached the House floor for vote at other sessions, they included: (1) HR-14, "to 
promote the efficient, fair and independent operation" of FCC, CAB, FPC, FTC, ICC and SEC by tightening 
restrictions on ex-parte approaches to agencies. (2) HR-1164, "to promote the public interest" by providing 
for network regulation. (3) HR-1165, to put "additional limitations on the transfer of broadcast licenses." All 
were referred back to the Commerce Committee for the priority action which Harris promised this session. 

Landis recommendations for an agency overseer in the White House weren't being hailed enthusi- 
astically by the Senate Commerce Committee, either. Chmn. Magnuson (D-Wash.) told us last week he had 
"no comment" on the Landis report, and that he hadn't had a chance to read it yet. Magnuson also said he'd 
get his committee together soon to lay the groundwork for his own inspection of agency structures — planned 
as a major undertaking of the Senate committee this session. 

TELEVISION FACTBOOK EXPANDS: What we believe to be the most comprehensive market- 

ing reference on American commercial TV will be published April 15 by Triangle Publications, Inc. It's our 
expanded 1961 Television Factbook, which has been doubled in content to more than 1,000 pages. Among its 
features being presented for the first time are: 

(1) Coverage data from American Research Bureau's 1960 report on all commercial TV stations. 

(2) Exact scale reproductions of all station-contour maps, as filed with the FCC. Each station will be 



VOL 17: No. 2 



3 



treated on a full page, and map shadings will indicate its coverage in specific counties. ARB data, indicated on 
the maps, will also be listed in adjacent columns. 

1961 Television Factbook will be the first reference publication to incorporate ARB-study results with 
basic data on individual stations — their coverage, facilities, personnel and history. Data will include a com- 
plete breakdown of total households & TV homes in 3 classifications of counties: those with over 50% net 
weekly circulation, 25-to-50%, under 25%. ARB Pres. James Seiler describes the coverage study as the first 
ever to be made with viewer records of TV-viewing activities. 

Updated reference material of interest & value to all services of the TV industry will also be furnished 
by 1961 Television Factbook. Included in the basic information: complete data on CATV systems, FCC direc- 
tory, foreign-TV directory, market-research firms, program sources, ownership of stations, manufacturers of 
TV sets and telecasting equipment. 

A 12-page brochure containing full particulars of the 1961 Television Factbook will be mailed next 
week to all Television Digest subscribers. 



Congress 

More about 

BARRAGE OF BILLS: More than 50 bills affecting the 

TV-radio business at one point or another — from man- 
ufacturing to advertising — showered down on Capitol 
Hill last week in the opening days of the 87th Congress. 

And no end to the deluge was in sight. In the ses- 
sion’s first 2 days alone, when the Senate hadn’t yet 
put its bill-filing machinery in motion, the House 
hopper was crammed with a total of nearly 2,000 pro- 
posals for new laws or changes in old ones. Legislative 
clerks & printers were far behind in their work of 
labeling & numbering the bills. 

Many of the broadcasting-related bills wouldn’t be 
heard from again. But few industry subjects were left un- 
touched by House members seeking to get their proposals 
on record, at least — and similar measures were drafted for 
a pile-up on the Senate side. 

In addition to a series of bills submitted by House 
Commerce Committee Chmn. Harris (D-Ark.) to carry out 
recommendations of his Legislative Oversight Subcommit- 
tee (see opposite page), these were among the early House 
& Senate measures: 

On FCC: HR-1126, by Rep. Younger (R-Cal.), raising 
FCC & ICC jurisdictions to cabinet status by setting up a 
Dept, of Transportation & Communications. HR-1234, by 
Rep. Stratton (D-N.Y.), giving FCC authority to turn down 
applicants who have criminal records. HR-1118, by Rep. 
Younger (R-Cal.), authorizing FCC (& other agencies) to 
help pay their own way by collecting fees from parties in 
cases. 

On agency practices & ethics: HR-896, 1138 & 351 by 
Reps. Baldwin (R-Cal.), Bennett (D-Fla.) and Fascell (D- 
Fla.), setting up standards of conduct for govt, employes. 
H. J. Res. 27, by Bennett, to set up a Commission on Ethics 
in the Federal Govt, for the same purpose. HR-302, by 
Bennett, to limit employment of ex-govt, workers by com- 
panies which have had cases before agencies. HR-349, by 
Fascell, for “reorganization of administrative procedures 
& practices.” HR-177, by Rep. Walter (D-Pa.), qualifying 
all members of the bar of federal courts and highest state 
courts to practice before govt, agencies. S-153, by Sens. 
McClellan (D-Ark.), Humphrey (D-Minn.) and Ervin 
(D-N.C.), to permit any agency reorganization plan sub- 
mitted by the White House (Vol. 17:1 pi) before June 1, 



1963, to become law unless rejected by a majority of either 
House or Senate. 

On broadcast programming: HR-1748, by Rep. Celler 
(D-N.Y.), to “strengthen the effectiveness” of FCC in de- 
termining whether applicants for station-license renewals 
have lived up to their original programming promises. 
HR-1207, by Rep. Mutter (D-N.Y.), making it a crime for a 
station to “make unauthorized deletions” from sponsored 
material which has been accepted for broadcasting. 

On pay TV: HR-1728, by Rep. Bailey (D-W. Va.), “to 
prohibit charging fee to view telecasts in private homes.” 

On TV-radio news coverage: H. Res. 27, by Rep. Grif- 
fiths (D-Mich.), “to provide equal access for all news media 
before proceedings of the House.” S-56, by Sen. Goldwater 
(R-Ariz.), forbidding broadcasts of Presidential election 
returns prior to midnight EST on Election night (see p. 4). 

On equal time: A Communications Act amendment by 
Sen. Magnuson regularizing suspension of Sec. 315 for can- 
didates for President & Vice President (see p. 4). 

On educational TV: HR-132, by Rep. Roberts (D-Ala.), 
to authorize federal matching grants of up to $1 million for 
each state, D.C. and Puerto Rico, for equipping ETV sta- 
tions (reviving a nearly-successful plan he advocated last 
session). HR-645 & 966, by Reps. Boggs (D-La.) & Harris, 
along the same lines. In the Senate, Sen. Magnuson (D- 
Wash.) also reintroduced his ETV-aid bill (last session’s 
Senate-approved S-12), co-sponsored by Sen. Schoeppel 
(R-Kan.). 

On TV sports blackouts: HR-178, 323 and 1147 by 
Reps. Walter, Byrnes (R-Wis.) and Collier ( R-Ill.) , ex- 
empting pro baseball & other sports from anti-trust laws so 
that club owners may agree on limits for broadcasts of 
games. S-168, by Sen. Kefauver, repeating similar anti- 
trust exemptions which he proposed last session. 

On the spectrum: HR-1162, by Harris, reviving never- 
activated 1959 proposals (HR-7057) to establish a National 
Telecommunications Board in White House jurisdiction to 
set allocations policies, standards and procedures. 

On FTC: HR-1817, 1233, 1181 and 145, by Reps. Pat- 
man (D-Tex.), Steed (D-Okla.), Lesinski (D-Mich.) and 
Rogers (D-Colo.), authorizing FTC to issue temporary 
cease-&-desist orders against TV advertisers & others ac- 
cused of deceptive practices. HR-127, 1833, 1180, 143, 1210, 
597 and 116, by Reps. Patman, Steed, Lesinski, Rogers, 
Multer, Zablocki (D-Wis.) and Madden (D-Ind.), providing 
further tightening of the FTC Act against fraudulent ad- 
vertising & product misrepresentations. 

On excise taxes: HR-241, by Rep. Lesinski, repealing 



4 



JANUARY 9, 1961 



manufacturers’ & retailers’ excise taxes on TV, radios and 
phono sets and other products. HR-938, by Rep. Collier, 
and a series of nearly identical bills by a dozen other House 
members, repealing excise tax on communications services. 

On product misbranding: HR-1141, by Rep. Bray (R- 
Ind.), to guard consumers against being misled by manu- 
facturers’ descriptions of “decorative hardwood & simu- 
lated hardwood” used in such products as TV & radio set 
chassis. 

On foreign products: HR-1149, by Rep. Dent (D-Pa.), 
to require sellers of imported products (including TV & 
radio sets) to advertise their foreign origin clearly. H. 
Con. Res. 4 & 10, by Reps. Bailey & Flynt (D-Ga.), for- 
bidding further tariff reductions. H. J. Res. 65, by Rep. 
Robison (R-N.Y.), to set up a commission to determine 
effects of foreign trade on domestic industry. HR-1070, 
1028, 757 and 687, by Reps. Pucinski ( D-Ill.) , St. George 
(R-N.Y.), Monagan (D-Conn.) and Lane (D-Mass.), to 
weigh competitive U.S. & foreign wages & working condi- 
tions in fixing import duties. 



SEC. 315 ‘WATCHDOG’ HEARINGS: Public hearings on 
reports of equal-time misbehavior by broadcasters dur- 
ing the 1960 election campaign (Vol. 16:50 p6) will be 
conducted between Jan. 20 & Feb. 1 by the Senate Com- 
merce Freedom of Communications Subcommittee. 

The 3-man Sec. 315 “watchdog” unit headed by Sen. 
Yarborough (D-Tex.) voted unanimously at a closed 
meeting Jan. 6 to ventilate “representative” complaints 
among “thousands” which chief counsel Creekmore Fath 
reported had been received from candidates, campaign 
managers, viewers & listeners. 

No definite dates for the hearings were set, but they’ll 
be scheduled after the inauguration of President-elect 
Kennedy and after the full Commerce Committee completes 
confirmation hearings on his nomination of N.C. Gov. 
Luther H. Hodgers as Commerce Secretary. Fath told us 
that no witness list had been drawn up. It is likely, 
however, that network officials and operators of some TV 
& radio stations will be called to Washington to take the 
stand for questioning. 

At the same time, Yarborough & his fellow “watchdogs,” 
Sens. McGee (D-Wyo.) & Scott (R-Pa.) approved publica- 
tion of a series of volumes containing texts of broadcasts 
& other material heard during the Presidential campaign. 
They will be Subcommittee sourcebooks, intended for 
checking & comparison purposes, and will carry no com- 
ments by the Subcommittee or its staff. 

The 7 or 8 separate volumes will include: (1) Scripts 
of all 15-min. news programs broadcast by TV & radio 
networks from Sept. 17 through Nov. 7, 1960. (2) Chron- 
ological compilations of everything that was said publicly, 
day by day, by Kennedy & Vice President Nixon. (3) Full 
transcripts of the 4-program Great Debate series. (4) 
Transcripts of other network-show appearances by Ken- 
nedy & Nixon. 

Meanwhile, Sen. Goldwater (R-Ariz.), spokesman for 
the GO P’s conservative wing, came through on Capitol 
Hill with the first legislative proposal in the new Congress 
dealing with politics & broadcasting. Added to a mountain 
of bills introduced in the opening days of the session (see 
p. 3) was Goldwater’s S-56. It would amend the Communi- 
cations Act to prohibit any TV or radio station from broad- 
casting any Presidential election returns — from “any one 
or more precincts in any state” — before midnight EST 
election night. 



Goldwater explained in a Senate floor speech: “On 
election night just past, the radio & TV stations of the 
Eastern part of the United States were broadcasting re- 
sults of the election in precincts, cities and states before 
the polls had closed in Cal. & other Western states. I think 
it takes unfair advantage of the time difference in the 
United States.” 

Opening of Congress also was marked by filing of a 
windup report by the Special House Campaign Expendi- 
tures Committee on its Dec. hearings at which CBS’s Frank 
Stanton, NBC’s Robert W. Sarnoff and ABC’s Leonard H. 
Goldenson gave their networks’ views on broadcasting’s 
election role (Vol. 16:51 pi). 

The Committee headed by Rep. Davis (D-Tenn.) 
praised broadcasters generally for the “commendably im- 
partial manner” in which they conducted themselves under 
the 1960-campaign suspension of Sec. 315 for Presidential 
tickets. But as expected, the Committee avoided making 
any firm recommendations about what Congress should do 
with equal-time rules. 

“The case to eliminate Sec. 315 altogether should be 
fully explored,” the Committee said, but urged no changes 
in the law. It warned instead that Sec. 315 repeal might 
“lead to abuses by individual broadcasting stations.” At 
the same time, the Committee suggested that Congress 
consider making permanent the suspension for Presidential 
& Vice Presidential candidates only. 

Continuation of the Presidential-ticket suspension in 
future campaigns was promptly proposed in legislation 
introduced by Chmn. Magnuson (D-Wash.) of the Senate 
Commerce Committee. Following the Electoral College 
count which affirmed President-elect Kennedy’s victory, 
Magnuson said the Kennedy-Nixon debates played a big 
part in the outcome. 

Note: In a Jan. 5 speech in Ithaca, N.Y., CBS Inc. 
Pres. Stanton carried on his anti-equal-time campaign 
by urging Communications Acts amendments which would 
expand the Great Debate format to include candidates for 
Senate, House and state governor. 



Touch-&-go election contest between House Commerce 
Committee veteran Moulder (D-Mo.) & Republican Robert 
Bartel (Vol. 16:50 p6) was resolved in Moulder’s favor last 
week. The House voted to seat Moulder, original chmn. of 
the Legislative Oversight Subcommittee. But he was sworn 
in only after an objection had been raised by Rep. Miller 
(R-N.Y.), and after Speaker Rayburn (D-Tex.) had assured 
Minority Leader Halleck (R-Ind.) that a further protest 
could be made to the House Administration Committee. 

Technology 

Space-allocations study has been undertaken by the 
EIA-IRE-sponsored Joint Technical Advisory Committee 
at the request of FCC in connection with its special in- 
quiry into frequency problems (Vol. 16:52 pl3). Heading 
the JTAC project is Lt. Gen. James D. O’Connell (ret.) of 
General Telephone & Electronics Corp. Working with him: 
Richard Emberson, Associated Universities; Richard P. 
Gifford, GE; John P. Hagen, National Aeronautics & Space 
Administration; J. W. Herbstreit, National Bureau of 
Standards; Donald MacQuivey, State Dept.; Ross Peavey, 
National Academy of Sciences; Allen H. Peterson, Stan- 
ford Research Institute; C. A. Petry, Aeronautical Radio 
Inc.; Thomas F. Rogers, MIT; L. C. Tillotson, Bell Tele- 
phone Labs. EIA & IRE provide initial financing for the 
study, with additional support from individual companies. 



VOL. 17: No. 2 



5 



Stations 

WHAT’S THE PUBLIC INTEREST? When Comr. Charles 
King recently said (Vol. 16:39 p4) that what troubled 
him most about his new FCC job was the absence of a 
definition of the “public interest,” we asked our bu- 
reaus in N.Y., Washington and Los Angeles to get 
representative samplings on their beats of what the 
expression means to TV executives. “Try to keep each 
statement to 25 words or less,” we added hopefully. 

Subsequently, we got a lot of definitions — but none 
made it in 25 words. N.Y. & Los Angeles produced the 
attempts you will find below, but nobody in the nation’s 
capital would take a crack at the job. “They all assured 
me,” reported our Washington. bureau chief, “that it would 
take a treatise or volume to get their ideas across.” 

Anyway, here’s some of what we did get — and if you’d 
care to contribute to this symposium, we’d be glad to hear 
from you: 

Robert W. Sarnoff, chmn. of the board, NBC (from his 
testimony before FCC Jan. 28, 1960): “NBC’s concept of 
a television service in the public interest is one that gives 
reasonable satisfaction to the varying interests of the main 
audience elements; which does so by proportioning its 
program structure in general to the relative weights of 
these varying elements; which does not allow majority 
tastes to suppress a fair reflection of minority interests, 
and does not frustrate majority interests by converting a 
mass medium into a specialized one. Beyond these balanc- 
ing factors, we believe that broadcasters in a democracy 
have an obligation to lead the audience by providing 
information that will equip them for better citizenship, and 
by offering opportunities to enjoy the arts so as to broaden 
& cultivate taste.” 

Donald H. McGannon, pres., Westinghouse Bcstg. Co.: 
“There is no scientific or easily-stated definition of ‘in the 
public interest.’ As I view it, broadcasting property is 
operated in the public interest when it is firmly integrated 
& related to its community, undertakes to know it, in its 
problems, in its accomplishments, in the composition of its 
people, in its futures, and then, in turn, undertakes to 
achieve the fullest potential in the use of that mass media. 
Obviously, certain basic elements are common to all com- 
munities, but the difference in the character & personality 
of cities or areas calls for creative tailoring of program- 
ming that is over & above the basics. Canned statistics & 
rigid definition, to the exclusion of understanding & depth 
perception, will never adequately reflect the true status of 
how well a station is operating ‘in the public interest.’ ” 

Ted Cott, vp of NTA station operations: “To segregate 
the phrase, ‘in the public interest,’ as distinct from the 
other two parts of the language of the law is to acknow- 
ledge only one child when triplets are born. This phrase 
must be taken in relationship to the other items stipulated: 
‘In the public interest, convenience and necessity.’ Any- 
thing that interests the public fulfills the mandate of the 
law. However, it was significant that the additional words, 
‘convenience & necessity,’ were placed with co-equal 
strength. Whether the public convenience is served, there- 
fore, when 3 stations in a market all play a murder mystery 
at the same time or a Western at the same time is a matter 
of some doubt. To conform to the concept of necessity is to 
have public reflexes that are immediately responsive to the 
needs of any one in the community who desperately needs 
a certain type of blood and calls upon a station to find the 
potential donors; to help an organization raise funds for 



important social, patriotic or civil causes; to assist organi- 
zations in presenting programs that demonstrate their 
public positions in a manner that will be in the public 
interest and not contribute to the public boredom. Public 
service that does not serve the public but merely fills out a 
few pages in a program log is a travesty of responsibility.” 
Dick Powell, pres., Four Star Television: “The public 
interest is being served by giving the people what they 
want to see. They wanted to see the Nixon-Kennedy 
debates, and the vast majority of them tuned in. We should 
never take a medium like TV and shove something down 
the people’s throat that they don’t want. BBC did that and 
people are watching the other network in England. You 
make shows with good taste and give them what they want 
— that’s serving the public interest.” 

William Dozier, vp in charge of West Coast activities. 
Screen Gems: “Programming in the public interest, as I 
interpret it, can have both a negative & positive meaning. 
Negatively, it means programming which, though primarily 
designed to entertain, is careful not to undermine the best 
interests of the viewers it is intended primarily to attract. 
Those interests lie in the areas of general sensibilities, 
respect for authority, respect for one’s fellow man, respect 
for one’s country and its institutions and respect for one’s 
God. Positively, it means programming which is primarily 
designed to broaden one’s appreciation & respect in all 
those areas, rather than simply not undermine them, and 
programming not primarily designed to entertain.” 

Felix Jackson, vp in charge of programs, NBC-TV, 
Hollywood: “I would say that it is in the public interest 
to have the best creative manpower perform to the max- 
imum capacity of their creative abilities. But, there again, 
the degree of creative ability is a matter of individual 
opinion. I might offer the audience a show which has all 
the ingredients to serve the public interest — in my opinion. 
And the audience might hate the show. Would that be, 
then, in the public interest?” 

A1 Flanagan, vp-gen.mgr., KCOP Los Angeles: “To 
operate in the public interest means to offer programs from 
which the viewer would derive a benefit. These benefits 
should enlighten the audience with informational & edu- 
cational programs, entertain them with music, drama and 
sports, and provide the economic well-being of those who 
support these broadcasts.” 

Bert Granet, exec, producer, Desilu Productions: 

“There is a sharp division as to what ‘public interest’ 
means. From the networks’ standpoint, it means to be 
artistic & seek cultural achievements, since they have other 
sources of income. For the manufacturer of film with only 
one source of income, it must be in the sphere of enter- 
tainment. We’re not subsidized by anyone. We feel a great 
sense of responsibility and many of us are well-equipped to 
do better things in the public interest. However, we provide 
mass entertainment, and we seek to serve the public inter- 
est by attempting to film our shows with taste & intelli- 
gence. To work with integrity is in the public interest.” 
James Riddell, vp in charge of Western div., ABC: 
“The keynote of the broadcasters’ role in the American 
way of life is the term ‘public interest.’ Using this as the 
base upon which to build programming for the millions of 
viewers, the objective is to entertain & inform. Documen- 
taries, tele-biographies, multi-sports coverage, dramatic 
shows, comedy, musicals and variety shows — something for 
everyone — make up the potpourri of programming every 
responsible broadcaster must be able to offer the audience 
. . . Broadcasting [also] has a responsibility — a duty, really 
— to keep viewers abreast of the news as it is happening.” 



6 



JANUARY 9, 1961 



Tower-evaluation proposal of FAA (Vol. 16:48 p3) 
will be the subject of an FAA hearing this week (Jan. 10). 
The hearing had been requested by both broadcast & non- 
broadcast interests. Broadcasters’ goal is to persuade FAA 
to abandon its plan to conduct eleborate hearings designed 
to judge whether a proposed structure would be an air 
hazard. Their argument is that such hearings are both 
unnecessary & pointless because an informal procedure has 
proved adequate in the past & because FCC has the final 
word on tower approval anyway. FAA Administrator 
Quesada has acknowledged that FCC has the final word — 
but industry has been unable to get him to accept its opin- 
ion that the Commission is required to conduct its own 
hearing on a proposed tower regardless of any earlier 
FAA finding that the tower would be a hazard. Broadcast- 
ing interests to be represented at the hearing include NAB, 
Storer, MST and FCBA. 

Authority over receiving-towers won’t be sought by 
FCC, which had been considering recommending legislation 
to grant the power to the Commission. It’s understood that 
the Commission concluded that the authority isn’t needed — 
and that it would impose an intolerable burden on its staff. 

Kahlua liqueur is getting spot announcements on 
KDAY Santa Monica, a non-NAB radio station. The sched- 
ule is 60 sec., 12 times weekly. Gen. mgr. Mel Leeds says 
he does not consider the Kahlua a “hard liquor” and adds 
that KDAY would reject such commercials. It’s understood 
that ad agency Jules Berman & Associates tried to place 
the spots with other L.A. radio stations, but was turned 
down by all but KDAY. The agency would not identify 
the other stations. In Washington, NAB’s Radio Code 
Office said “we’re always concerned” when any station 
breaks the ban on liquor advertising. There were no 
reports of any spread of the Kahlua commercial, said NAB. 

KTRK-TY Houston took the unusual action recently 
(there may be precedents, but we don’t recall any) of 
suggesting that its viewers watch a rival program rather 
than its own. Throughout the day, the station broadcast 
the following announcement: “Ch. 13 is always proud of 
its own programs and urges you to see them. Tonight, 
however, while we run The Untouchables at 8:30, our 
neighbor station, Ch. 2 [KPRC-TV], presents a documen- 
tary of great dramatic & historical dimension, the 90-min. 
edition of ‘Victory at Sea,’ the great award-winning series 
that depicts the Navy’s role in World War II. We depart 
from our usual procedure, therefore, to urge that you see 
this great program tonight at 8:30 on Ch. 2, and we will 
welcome you back to The Untotichables next week.” 

“Be on TV” (John Day Co., 166 pp., illus., $3.50) is 
intended as a youngster’s guide to a TV career. It’s auth- 
ored by Die Gardner, who produces a children’s show for 
KOMO-TV Seattle. The book outlines procedures for tour- 
ing a local TV station, arranging for auditions, setting up 
home TV workshops, and choosing & preparing for the 
“various special jobs” in TV. 

Voice of Democracy broadcast scriptwriting contest 
winners in 50 states & D.C. are 26 high school girls & 25 
boys. The winners of the 4 top awards in the NAB-EIA- 
VFW-sponsored competition (college scholarships valued 
from $1,500 to $500) will be announced Feb. 22 at a Wash- 
ington luncheon. 

Sale of WFRV (Ch. 5) Green Bay, Wis. for $1,609,794 
to the owners of WAVE-TV Louisville & WFIE-TV Evans- 
ville has been approved by FCC (Vol. 16:49 pll). 



The FCC 

FCC PONDERS PAYOFF RULES: Now that Congress has 
told FCC to keep a sharper eye on compromises between 
competing applicants (“payoffs,” mergers, etc.) in the 
Harris-Pastore amendments, the Commission is draft- 
ing revisions in its rules to reflect the changed law. 

Actually, in June 1958 (Vol. 14:26 p6), the Commis- 
sion started rule-making which would permit no compro- 
mises at all, but Congress obviously didn’t want it to go 
that far. The proposal lay fallow for 2% years until the 
law was amended. 

It’s understood that the Commission is considering ask- 
ing contestants who agree on a deal whereby one of them 
is left free for grant, to supply the following information: 

(1) Why the deal is in the public interest. 

(2) Who started the negotiations ? 

(3) Who gets what out of the agreement? 

(4) Details of the negotiations. 

(5) An itemized account of money spent by the party 
getting paid — for preparing & prosecuting his own applica- 
tion. 

In addition, the Commission is thinking of delegating 
to its chief examiner the authority to approve or disap- 
prove all deals — subject, of course, to review by the Com- 
mission itself. The idea behind this, apparently, is to 
get more consistency than would be achieved if each ex- 
aminer were given power to rule. 

Chief examiner James Cunningham is tightening up 
already, even before the new rules are adopted. In a radio 
case involving 3 applicants (Windber, Pa.), he declined to 
approve the dropout of 2 applicants who were to receive 
$3,175 & $1,000, respectively, from the remaining applicant. 
He asked for justification to show that such expenditures 
by the dropouts were made “legitimately & prudently,” as 
the new law requires. 



FCC changed its mind last week (all except Chmn. 
Ford, who dissented) in deciding that there are no duopoly 
problems involving KING-TV & KIRO-TV Seattle. It 
renewed their licenses with no conditions attached. Pre- 
viously, the Commission had ruled that the Pacific National 
Bank of Seattle would have to dispose of its interest in 
KIRO-TV because Mrs. A. Scott Bullitt, major stockholder 
of KING-TV, is also a dir. & stockholder of the bank (Vol. 
16:50 p9, 17:1 p8). 

FCC cuts more red tape: Examiners’ initial decisions 
to which neither the parties nor the Commission’s staff 
objects will become final from now on without review by 
the Commissioners. FCC said that the new procedure would 
speed its processes. One exception was made. When 
revocation of a license is involved, the Commission will 
review the initial decision in all cases, “due to the drastic 
nature of the sanction imposed.” 



ORDER YOUR 1960 BOUND VOLUME 

We will bind & index all 1960 copies of Tele- 
vision Digest, Vol. 16, including supplements and 
special reports. This embossed hard-cover volume — 
the authoritative record of the television industry in 
1960 — is available at $25.00. Orders will be accepted 
through February 1, 1961. 




VOL. 17: No. 2 



7 



Advertising 

NATIONAL BUSINESS IS A COMBO OF LOCALS: Two sharp 
reminders that there’s really no such thing as a uni- 
form “national market” for household products (and 
that local product buying can vary widely between & 
within areas) came last week from 2 station groups. 

The first was a report of market-by-market variations 
in product usage & brand preferences between the 5 TV 
markets covered by Westinghouse Bcstg. Co. stations 
repped by WBC’s TvAR. 

The 2nd report came from Corinthian Bcstg. Co. and, 
largely by coincidence, carried the WBC study to the next 
logical step — comparing brand-purchasing differences 
within a given TV market (Ft. Wayne, Ind.) between the 
station’s home metropolitan area and the suburban & 
exurban area around it. 

Both studies, however, shared a common moral: To 
maintain a steady national sales volume for products, 
advertisers should tailor a certain amount of advertising — 
preferably with spot TV — to local peculiarities of markets. 

The Westinghouse Study 

Based on personal home interviews by Pulse during 
July 1960 in the 5 WBC TV markets (Baltimore, Boston, 
Cleveland, San Francisco and Pittsburgh), the TvAR study 
found such variations in consumer preferences as these: 

Of the 5 markets, San Francisco was the leader in 
coffee-drinking, with 96.9% of families using coffee (as 
compared with 91.4% in Boston). There was considerable 
difference in consumption of “regular” or “instant.” In 
Pittsburgh, 55.6% of families used “regular coffee only,” 
21.8% “instant coffee only.” But in Baltimore, instant 
coffee led with 40.7% of families, 30.7% using regular. 

Among regular coffees, Maxwell House was the leader 
in Boston with a 26.0% share of the market among regular- 
coffee fanciers. It also led (but with different shares) in 
Baltimore & Cleveland. In San Francisco, it was in 4th 
place, with an 8.7% share (Folger’s with 26.4% was tops), 
and in Pittsburgh, A&P’s house-brand coffees led 2nd-place 
Maxwell House with a 26.5% share. Maxwell House Instant 
led its product category in all 5 markets, although its fat 
39.8% share of the instant market in Boston contrasted 
to its close win of only 15.9% in San Francisco. 

Suggested Robert M. Hoffman, TvAR mktg. & research 
dir.: “Coffee makers should promote instant brands heavily 
in Baltimore ... On the other hand, above-average expendi- 
tures for regular coffee should be made in Pittsburgh.” 

Other categories (and specific brands) covered in 
WBC’s TvAR study: Cigarets, gasoline, tea, beer & ale, cold 
cereals, dog food and milk additives. Highlights: 

Usage of cold cereals differed between markets, from a 
low of 83.2% of families in Pittsburgh to a top figure of 
87.7% in Boston. Hands-down winner was Kellogg’s Corn 
Flakes in all 5 areas. 

Instant tea was used by 13% of families in Pittsburgh, 
possibly because of its time-saving qualities, but in Boston 
— which frowns on anything other than British-style pot- 
brewed tea — only 5% of families bought instant tea brands. 

Cleveland turned out to be a canine stronghold, with 
33% of the families owning dogs (and using canned dog 
food primarily) as compared with 25% in the other areas. 

A drop-off was reported in some WBC markets in the 
percentage of men & women smoking filter cigarets (as 
compared with previous TvAR studies). Kent led the filter 
field in Boston & Pittsburgh, Winston in Baltimore, Cleve- 
land and San Francisco. 



The Corinthian Study 

Corinthian’s project mailed questionnaires to a large 
random sample of households in the 19 Ind. and Ohio 
counties served by WANE-TV in addition to metropolitan 
Ft. Wayne. The study was made from May to July 1960 
under research consultant Charles Harriman Smith. It 
sought to determine household-product purchasing habits 
(when & where shopping was done, and brand purchasing) 
and considerable automotive & household data. 

The report, titled “Home Inventory Study,” showed 
that what was true of Ft. Wayne was not necessarily true 
of its suburbs. Samples: 

In Ft. Wayne, 91.5% of families use coffee. In the 
balance of WANE-TV’s market, the figure drops to 80.5%. 
The total average was 83.8%. Among regular coffee 
brands, Maxwell House was the leader. But Chase & San- 
born was twice as popular outside the metropolitan area as 
inside it (only 12.8% of coffee-drinking Ft. Wayne house- 
holds had some on hand; 26.5% in the outer area). 

Similar patterns emerged in other product categories. 
Cold-cereal usage was about the same in either area (96.4% 
vs. 96.3%), and Kellogg’s Corn Flakes was the brand leader. 
Among cigaret smokers, 11.8% in Ft. Wayne reported they 
had Camel on hand (the top rank), but 13.0% in the outer 
area (again the top rank) reported they had Winston in 
the house. There were comparative variations in beer 
brands, usage of toothpaste (favored in the city) vs. tooth 
powder (favored outside), etc. 

Said WANE-TV vp & gen. mgr. Reid G. Chapman: 
“The significance of the total-market concept is immediately 
evident from the following comparison: There are more 
than twice as many households in that part of the total 
market outside of the home county as within. In other 
words, two-thirds of the market is outside the metropolitan 
area.” Moral, as Chapman saw it: “Total-market decisions 
are still frequently made on the basis of data coming from 
the metropolitan area alone.” 

* * * 

Marketing-data breakdown based on masses of inform- 
ation gathered in the 1960 U.S. census, providing hitherto- 
unavailable household details, is planned by S. J. Tesauro 
& Co., Detroit data-processing firm. Financed in part by 
appliance manufacturers who wanted more details than 
the Census Bureau itself will provide in series of reports, 
Tesauro has contracted with the Bureau to obtain the data 
for tapes. Estimated cost of the Census Bureau service to 
the Detroit company: $500,000, which Tesauro expects to 
recover by sales of specialized reports to manufacturers, 
agencies and advertisers. The Bureau will start delivering 
data material to Tesauro during this summer. Tesauro’s 
own county-by-county & city-by-city reports, covering such 
details as family living standards, ownership of TV & radio 
sets and appliances, etc., probably will be available to 
buyers by the end of the year. 



Half of all TV advertising is pure waste, charged 
Young & Rubicam vp Charles Feldman last week. Research 
figures prove that “even on an immediate recall basis, half 
the viewers don’t remember commercials,” he told the 8th 
annual seminar of the American Marketing Assn, in Tor- 
onto Jan. 6. Many advertisers fail to win the consumer’s 
belief, thus making communication impossible, he said. The 
consumer has become increasingly sophisticated, having 
been exposed to innumerable product stories. “There is no 
need for camouflage,” he added. What’s needed to regain 
his belief is “a sincere, straightforward approach.” 



8 



JANUARY 9, 1961 



Tempest in a Toypot: A sizable post-Christmas storm 

has been stirred up in the toy industry by William Silver- 
stein, advertising mgr. of Aurora Plastics (model racing 
cars, other toys). Silverstein (whose industry’s network 
& spot billings reached a record level in 1960 of “well 
over $7 million”) warned competitors in the December 
issue of Toys & Novelties that a 3-market survey by his 
firm showed “a growing, if not full-grown, resentment 
leveled by the public at the toy industry . . . aimed at . . . 
the heavily TV-advertised toy.” It was, Silverstein said, 
“almost impossible for some of our leading manufacturers 
to put a toy on TV without misrepresenting it.” Said he: 
“We see non-floating battleships move through fog & haze; 
tanks crash through barbed wire blowing up outposts; toy 
rockets launch into space between actual film clips.” 

Was Silverstein indulging in some advertising sour 
grapes? Not at all. We contacted him in Chicago last 
week, where he had gone on a business trip. He was 
alarmed at the situation, he told us, because his firm intends 
to boost its TV spending sharply during 1961 — up from a 
1960 level of some 2% of budget (for a test campaign on 
a “bloop” pump-up rocket in N.Y., Los Angeles and Phila- 
delphia) to a whopping 80% for a national TV ad campaign 
in 1961. If TV-sold toys are suspect, Silverstein believes, 
his planned campaign faces a big hurdle. 

“In our own consumer survey, we found resentment to 
the pricing of toys sold on TV, to their TV commercials, 
and to the play value,” he told us. Regarding his printed 
attack, Silverstein said he had received “much favorable 
comment, and a great deal of mail from educators, minis- 
ters and neutral advertisers.” His TV plans center on 
Aurora’s “model motoring” sets (miniature electric cars, 
at $11 & $24) and on gas-powered model airplanes. 

Toymakers Praise TV's Impact 

Other toy-industry advertisers attested to the sales 
effectiveness of TV, but told us they didn’t think Silver- 
stein’s barbs were aimed at them. Jacques Zuccaire, ad 
mgr., Lionel Corp., (the country’s biggest model-train 
firm), said his company had spent “over $500,000” on TV in 
1960 (up 20% from 1959), with participations in WNTA- 
TV N.Y.’s Day Watch series, co-sponsorship of the annual 
Macy Thanksgiving Day parade, TV spot announcements in 
34 markets, and a twice-telecast filmed 30-min. special, 
“The Wonderful World of Trains,” on WPIX N.Y. “We 
have seen direct, over-the-counter sales reaction,” he told 
us, stating that TV had boosted Lionel sales by 10%. As to 
the veracity of Lionel’s commercials, Zuccaire said his firm 
had received “only one” letter of complaint in 1960. “Our 
commercials don’t mislead, don’t simulate the real object. 
Although they may glamorize, they are not unbelievable.” 
(He did admit he was “self-conscious” about a train- 
launched toy helicopter in a WPIX commercial which 
“hovered” a good deal longer than the real toy could.) 

A veteran adman in both toys and TV, Melvin Helitzer, 
Ideal Toy Corp. ad mgr., told us he agi’eed completely with 
Aurora’s Silverstein about the question of toy-commercial 
ethics. “A few firms in the toy industry are stinking up 
the field,” he said, advocating a general “clean-up of our in- 
dustry” as a solution. “Those responsible (for misleading 
ads) should be pointed at & made to assume ethical respon- 
sibility. Every sound effect in our commercials is substan- 
tiated by the toy; nothing is false.” Ideal, Helitzer added, 
spent “about 95%” of its over-$l million budget in TV in 
1960, virtually double its 1959 spending. Some network 
participations were used, but 80% of the TV spending was 
in a 48-market spot campaign. No seasonal advertiser, 
Ideal’s 1961 TV campaign is scheduled to start this week. 



Charles Marx, ad mgr. for Louis Marx Co., said it was 
easy to produce a toy commercial that could so glamorize 
the product that few youngsters could resist it. “If I 
didn’t have a conscience, I could produce a very good com- 
mercial in terms of sales impact,” he said. The Marx Co. 
is another pro-TV toy firm, placing 100% of its consumer- 
ad budget into a 24-market spot campaign in 1960 which 
was “quite successful, and almost tripled sales on toys we 
advertised on TV.” Plans for 1961 call for a budget in- 
crease — and again 100% spending in TV. The 1960 cam- 
paign was only Marx’s 2nd year of consumer advertising. 

At the N.Y. office of the National Better Business 
Bureau, however, vp Van Miller told us that his organiza- 
tion has received “a few more complaints about TV toy 
commercials” in 1960 but added that “it’s still less than 
those we get about newspaper ads.” The BBB does investi- 
gate “individual cases of presentation” that might tend 
to mislead youngsters, he stated, although he pointed out 
that “it is difficult to determine what misleads a child.” 

One complaint area cited by Miller involves the dub- 
bing-in of real-life sounds (rockets, explosions, etc.) in toy 
commercials. “Only NBC,” he told us, “forbids this prac- 
tice.” Currently, he added, BBB is trying to devise a set of 
criteria for toy advertising, “but we’re not having much 
luck. It is primarily up to the media.” 

* * * 

Faked TV commercials for products which “may be of 
the highest quality” have become a prime target of FTC, 
Chmn. Earl W. Kintner warned in a speech to Eastern 
Industrial Advertisers in Philadelphia last week. In fact, 
Kintner said, FTC’s monitoring of advertising demon- 
strations on TV has led to application of this rule to all 
advertising: “Apart from any determination of the merits 
of a product, a commercial may be considered illegally 
deceptive if purchasers may be induced thereby to purchase 
a product because they have been led to believe that they 
have seen a valid test or demonstration of it.” As examples, 
Kintner cited FTC complaints against TV demonstrations 
involving “men in white coats,” automobile safety glass, 
filter cigarets, stain-removing & protective-shield tooth- 
paste, margarine “flavor gems,” shaving cream & razor 
tests. Kintner also warned advertisers against phony 
endorsements of products by celebrities: “Where a legiti- 
mate endorsement is granted, a record should be made in 
case the matter is later called into question. And all claims 
of endorsement should be carefully limited to actual fact.” - 



Inauguration beer commercials — if any — will be viewed 
with special distaste by the National Temperance League. 
In an open letter to inaugural committee publicity dir. 
Samuel C. Brightman, League Pres. Erwin F. Bohmfalk 
expressed a “most sincere & vigorous protest” against 
brewer sponsorship of any TV or radio coverage of Jan. 20 
events in Washington. Bohmfalk said the ceremonies 
“should in no way be compromised by the advertising of an 
industry that has no right to operate except as that right is 
granted by the sufferance of the people.” Brightman had 
first indicated that his committee would frown on commer- 
cials for beer (along with deodorants & brassieres) as un- 
suitable. But he relented after Rep. Reuss (D-Wis.), whose 
home town is Milwaukee, filed a pained protest that beer 
“is as old as the history of western civilization & of demo- 
cratic institutions.” 

Ad People: William W. Mulvey has resigned as senior 

exec, vp, Cunningham & Walsh . . . K. (Haps) Kemper III 
named a Young & Rubicam vp. 



VOL. 17: No. 2 



9 



TV ad volume for 1961 will rise 7.3% from its $1.64 
billion mark in 1960 — to a high of close to $1.75 billion, 
predicts Richard P. Doherty, pres., TV-Radio Management 
Corp., in the latest Sponsor. Radio ad volume, he forecasts, 
will jump 3% in 1961 to $695 million. The upswings, adds 
Doherty, will come “in the last 6 months of the year.” And 
Larry H. Israel, vp & gen. mgr. of Westinghouse-owned 
TvAR rep firm, adds to the crystal-balling with the predic- 
tion that “spot TV billings will reach another new high in 
1961, despite increasing competition from other media.” 
Printers’ Ink sets a figure of $12 billion for total 1961 
ad budgets, and states that more than 60% of it “may now 
be up for approval.” 

Compton Pres. Barton A. Cummings, at the 14th annual 
forecasting conference of the Greater Philadelphia Chamber 
of Commerce last week, came up with his own forecasts 
for “the ad agency’s role in the total marketing picture for 
the 1960s.” Among them: “We will see networks & local 
stations working with ad agencies in holding down the 
increasing costs of time & talent and in increasing the 
attractiveness of programs ... As [these] costs continue 
to mount during the 1960s, agencies & clients will examine 
other media to keep in line the costs of marketing their 
products. I think it only fair that there be a re-examining 
of the costs of TV time & talent.” 

Soft-sell TV-radio campaign was launched Jan. 8 by 
the Manger hotels to promote their first supermarket 
product, a premium-priced coffee. Concentrating initially 
on the 14 cities in which there are Manger hotels, the firm 
has bought a weekly 30-min. segment of WNTA-TV N.Y.’s 
Open End, a limited schedule of participations in NBC-TV’s 
Dave Garrovoay-T oday show, and supporting spot radio. 
Wexton Advertising, N.Y., is the agency. 

Bolling Co., 14-year old station-rep firm, has bought 
Headley-Reed for over $500,000, Pres. George W. Bolling 
has announced. Effective Feb. 1, the buy will double 
Bolling’s current rep billings and bring them up to 6th 
among all reps, with about 45-50 TV & radio stations. 

Obituary 

Maximilian Elser, Jr., 70, former J. Walter Thompson 
PR dir., and more recently head of his own PR firm, died 
Jan. 3, at his home in Lancaster County, Pa. He is survived 
by his wife, 2 sons and a daughter. 

Auxiliary Services 

New Jerrold CATV Venture: Joining forces with theater- 

chain owner Alliance Amusement Corp. of Chicago, big 
CATV equipment-maker Jerrold Electronics Corp. has an- 
nounced the first of “several” joint community-antenna 
projects — a CATV system & microwave relay to serve 
Ottawa, 111. 

The system will relay the 4 Chicago commercial chan- 
nels plus WEEQ-TV La Salle to Ottawa via a 44-mile mic- 
rowave system. Ottawa TV Cable Co., owned by Jerrold 
and Alliance, will be run by James B. Wright, well known 
as a CATV operator, and will be Jerrold’s first new CATV 
venture since it sold its 9 CATV systems to H&B American 
Corp., Los Angeles, for $5 million (Vol. 16:33 p8). Partner- 
ship with Alliance is indicative of the growing movement 
into CATV business by theater operators. 

A July District Court anti-trust ruling bars Jerrold 
from acquiring CATV systems before April 1962 (Vol. 
16:31 p8), but does not apply to formation of new systems. 



Night-Club-in-Home TV: Telemeter, as the latest step in 

its Toronto pay-TV experiment, fed a live telecast starring 
fast-quipping comedian Bob Newhart to its 6,000-home 
hook-up Jan. 5. Price: $1.25. Taped repeats were offered 
on the following 2 nights. Newhart’s usual nightclub ask- 
ing price is now about $10,000, but Telemeter wasn’t say- 
ing what fee or share of boxoffice gross it was paying him. 

To help create a nightclub atmosphere (and to give 
Newhart an audience reaction against which to play), 
Telemeter used a small (100 people) studio audience. On 
the bill as an added attraction was Leon Bibb, a balladeer 
who recently played a club date at N.Y.’s Blue Angel. 

Telemeter had previously entered the live program 
area with plans for a taped version of the N.Y. City Center 
production of “The Mikado” (Vol. 16:44 p3) for which it 
arranged a scale with AFTRA, and for its own taped 
production of Menotti’s “The Consul” (Vol. 16:20 p4). 

Toronto press reaction Jan. 6: “Pay TV never had a 
better argument than it did last night when Bob Newhart 
appeared on the first live telecast on Telemeter” said 
Toronto Telegram’s Alex Barris. “For an hour & 20 
minutes last night I doubt whether anyone with a Tele- 
meter stopped laughing . . . The presentation showed a fine 
disregard for the usual divisions of time on TV ... If you 
have a chance to see it, it’s recommended” said Toronto 
Star’s Bob Blackburn. 

* * * 

Anti-pay-TV petitions from groups of citizens began 
piling up in the House last week as soon as the 87th Con- 
gress opened for business. The first batch, sent in from 
Dallas, Sherman, Denison and Belton, Tex., expressed op- 
position (in almost identical language) to “all pay-TV 
schemes & proposals as being contrary to the public inter- 
est.” All were referred in routine fashion to the Commerce 
Committee headed by Rep. Harris (D-Ark.). 



Medical TV center at the Army’s Walter Reed Hospital 
in Washington was still marked last week for budget- 
economy dissolution Jan. 30 (Vol. 17:1 pll). Civilian dir. 
Dr. Paul W. Schafer told us he’d heard “nothing very 
tangible” to indicate that the pioneering installation might 
be saved. Meanwhile, dismissed civilian staffers were being 
offered civil service reassignments. Examples: The center’s 
casting director was told he could have a typing-pool job, 
the scenery foreman learned that a mess attendant’s post 
was open for him. An enlisted man who has been the 
center’s top color-TV cameraman was reassigned to Korea, 
where there is no color TV. 

Translator starts: K78AV Gallup, N.M. began tests 
Dec. 20, carrying KOAT-TV Albuquerque • K74BD 
Dubuque, la. began about mid-December with WMT-TV 
Cedar Rapids • K82AM Waimea, Kauai expects equip- 
ment in January and hopes to start before end of month 
with parent & owner KGMB-TV. 

Rebroadcast permission from originating stations 
should continue to be required of outlets which do nothing 
but rebroadcast (translators & satellites), according to the 
latest FCC thinking. Last week, it rejected, 4-3, a proposed 
recommendation that Congress amend the law to relieve 
repeaters of the requirement. 

Two more station-CATV conflicts ended last week when 
FCC dismissed protests, at the request of all parties, filed 
against CATV-microwave grants by KLTV Tyler, Tex. and 
KGNS-TV Laredo, Tex. 



10 



JANUARY 9, 1961 



Programming 

Lower Rates for Public-Affairs? Networks faced a new 
public-affairs problem last week: A possible demand by 
advertisers for time-&-talent pricing of informational 
shows which reflects their generally smaller audiences. 
The situation was triggered by Fairfax M. Cone, chmn. of 
Foote, Cone & Belding’s executive committee. 

Prices for public-affairs shows, said Cone, should not 
be the same as the prices “for the entertainment of huge 
audiences.” Full-pricing of such shows, telecast by the 
networks to regain prestige lost in the quiz-scandal probes, 
he added, is asking the advertiser to pay for a network 
act of conscience 

Whether Cone’s proposal will get very far is problem- 
atical. For one thing, it opens the door to criticism of 
advertisers as a group pressuring the networks to continue 
with the bland, stereotyped entertainment shows which are 
under unflagging attack. 

For another, network price-trimming in the public- 
affairs area is nothing new. Although time charges are 
seldom if ever sliced (since it would tend to undermine 
rates), “program contributions” are often made on new 
public-affairs series by networks to get them started (Vol. 
16:5 p9). On NBC’s World Wide 60 series last season, 
for example, the initial program costs ran around $75,000, 
but NBC charged advertisers only $5,000 per show on a 
13-week “introductory” deal. Similarly, CBS and ABC 
have made price cutbacks in the program (but not time) 
price of public-affairs specials. Lately, however, prices 
have begun to firm since better ratings have tended to 
justify no-discount price tags for informational shows. 

Networks, meanwhile, were going ahead with some 
new program plans in this area. ABC announced a new 
Sunday series (12-12:30 p.m.) called Meet the Professor, 
produced by Wiley Hance in cooperation with the National 
Education Assn.’s higher-education dept., and it signed 
writers Robert Lewis Shayon, Elliott Baker and Alvin 
Boretz to produce outline scripts for the series. The show 
debuts Jan. 29 on ABC. 

CBS announced that Fred W. Friendly, currently 
exec, producer of CBS Reports, will also produce Face the 
Nation, which will alternate with CBS Reports. Alternate 
Face the Nation shows will be of 30-min. length to allow 
CBS affiliates to air local public-affairs shows in prime time. 

NBC announced 3 new production appointments to its 
special projects department: William Bendick to produce 
“public-interest” specials, William Nichols to produce & 
write America’s Music, a 60-min. series “showcasing the 
nation’s musical heritage,” and William A. Colleran to 
direct the first America’s Music show this spring. 



Flexibility paid off again for CBS and Firestone Tire & 
Rubber Co. during the Cuban crisis last week. Although 
NBC was off the mark early with a Jan. 3 preliminary 
report in the period just before the regular Jack Paar 
Show (11:15-11:30 p.m.), CBS was in action with a full- 
dress evening show on Jan. 6. As its showcase, CBS 
repeated the same stunt used Dec. 16 when it postponed a 
scheduled Eyewitness to History episode (Vol. 16:51 p5) 
to cover instead the pre-Christmas plane disaster in N.Y. 
Again, Firestone-sponsored Eyewitness (a report on the 
convening of the 87th Congress) was revamped on short 
notice, and a 30-min. report on the Cuban situation sub- 
stituted — with CBS News correspondent Charles Kuralt 
narrating & Ernest Leiser reporting from Havana. 



TV drama on segregation, an original by Reginald 
Rose, will be WNTA-TV N.Y.’s tape-syndicated The Play of 
the Week starting Jan. 16. Titled “Black Monday,” the 
drama deals with “emotional reactions of a community on 
a Monday morning when a Negro child starts for his first 
day at a newly integrated public school.” Its cast will in- 
clude playwright-actor Marc Connelly. Meanwhile, on a 
related front, a 3-year-old organization calling itself “Mon- 
itor South” announced its existence in a suburb of Shreve- 
port, La. According to its exec, dir., Ned Touchstone, the 
organization will study TV-radio shows for “sociologically 
offensive” material, and then act as an organized pressure 
group & boycott-organizer against sponsors of such “offen- 
sive” material. Monitor South’s objective, as Touchstone 
stated it last week, is “to improve relations between the 
networks & the Southern states.” 

Two ex-KTLA Los Angeles men were indicted by a 
Riverside, Cal., county grand jury last week for “conspiracy 
to commit slander.” Named in the indictment were ex- 
vp-gen. mgr. James Schulke & newsman Pat Michaels. The 
action resulted from a Dec. 11, 1959 telecast, “City of 
Hate,” in which Michaels charged anti-semitism in Elsinore, 
Cal. The jury also stated that “Michaels & Clete Roberts 
had joined in follow-up telecasts in which they made 
unwarranted inferences on the subject in which an investi- 
gation was being conducted by the Attorney General and 
the Riverside County Grand Jury.” 

WPIX N.Y.’s Continental Miniatures, in a departure 
from its foreign opera film format, will present a 3-part 
salute to Gilbert & Sullivan March 5-19. The Cal. Light 
Opera Co. will be featured, offering “H.M.S. Pinafore.” 
Another programming departure will be a 2-part presenta- 
tion (Feb. 12 & 19) of modern Italian pops music from 
the famed San Remo music festival. 

Weekly network-TV program costs are estimated on a 
show-by-show basis by Variety’s 55th anniversary issue 
(Jan. 4). The estimates, exclusive of time charges & 
commercials, cover production expenses, talent, royalties, 
agency commissions. The programs charted (nighttime & 
daytime) range from ABC’s About Faces to NBC’s Young 
Dr. Malone, each of which, the magazine reports, costs 
$2,500 per segment. Specials are also covered from CBS’s 
$500,000 “An Hour with Danny Kaye” to the same net- 
work’s $300,000 “Wizard of Oz.” 

KDKA-TV Pittsburgh newscaster Tom Finn, who 
joined the station from WTOL-TV Toledo on Jan. 2, became 
a participant in a dramatic news event less than 24 hours 
later. Returning from an assignment via an Allegheny 
River bridge, Finn was jostled by a young man who pushed 
by & went over the rail. The newscaster made an unsuc- 
cessful grab for the man, called the police, then directed 
his photographer in recording futile rescue efforts by a 
passing tug. 

Public service idea: KRON-TV San Francisco scheduled 
a prime-time debate (Jan. 7, 10-10:30 p.m.) on Sec. 315 to 
acquaint viewers with the law & ramifications of “equal 
time.” Participants: Eric Hass, 1960 Presidential candidate 
of the Socialist Labor party, presenting the views of 
minority parties, and KRON-TV gen. mgr. Harold P. See, 
representing broadcaster viewpoints. 

Defense Dept, has presented its certificate of commen- 
dation to The 20th Century. The CBS-TV documentary 
series won the award for “ably presenting Armed Forces 
activities & achievements to the public.” 



VOL 17: No. 2 



11 



Film & Tape 

Crosby Company Reactivating: Bing Crosby Productions, 

dormant for the past 2 years, is being reactivated. It’s 
currently looking for suitable properties for pilots, we 
were informed by Bing Crosby. His last TV production 
venture was a pilot of The Law & Mr. Jones, for ABC-TV, 
which didn’t sell. (Two years later Four Star Television 
acquired the property, made & sold a new pilot, and the 
series is now on ABC-TV) . 

Crosby said his company is interested both in produc- 
tion & investment. He owns a percentage of MGM-TV’s 
The Islanders, currently on ABC-TV. (It’s understood crea- 
tor-producer Richard L. Bare owns 17% of Islanders ; star 
William Reynolds 5%; MGM-TV and ABC-TV split the 
rest, with Crosby coming into the picture by owning half 
of ABC-TV’s percentage.) The star, under contract to 
ABC-TV for 2 specials a year, plans no film series in which 
he would appear, and “I’m staying out of TV as a pro- 
ducer; it’s too tough,” he told us. 



Seven Arts sold its 40-feature post-1950 Warner pack- 
age to RKO General’s WOR-TV last week. Price tag on the 
deal: $1 million plus. “The High & the Mighty,” “A Star 
Is Born” and “Strangers on a Train” are among the box- 
office hits, 26 of which are in color. (WOR-TV began color- 
casting 4 months ago, now does 25 hours a week.) Station 
officials told us the features will be presented in a 90-min. 
showcase, with a minimum of cutting. “We hope to sell the 
entire series to just one advertiser,” said special-programs 
dir. Milton Robertson. WOR-TV is the 21st sale for Seven 
Arts, which began marketing the Warner package in mid- 
Octover. The other sales include WCAU-TV Philadelphia, 
KVAR-TV Phoenix, WTMJ-TV Milwaukee and WTVJ 
Miami. 

CBS Films Inc. international sales rose 30% in 1960 
over 1959 and 250% over 1957, it’s reported by Sam Cook 
Digges, administrative vp. In his year-end summary, 
Digges reports that domestic sales maintained their 1959 
record level despite the softness of the syndication market. 
He terms the outlook for this year “extremely bullish.” 
CBS Films is currently placing more than 1,100 half-hours 
every week in 43 countries. In 1960 it sold shows for the 
first time in Brazil, Nigeria, Curacao, New Zealand and the 
United Arab Republic. 

Carousel Films is distributing 3 special CBS News 
programs to the 16mm non-theatrical market (schools, govt, 
agencies, social & industrial groups) : “The Thinking 
Machine”, which highlights the TX-0 digital computer, and 
“Big City-1980”, which deals with the future of man’s pop- 
ulation centers. Both are from the Tomorrow series. (Co- 
incidentally, these are the same 2 programs selected by 
publisher J. B. Lippincott as subjects for proposed full- 
length books (Vol. 16:50 p8). The 3rd release is “The 
Influential Americans,” a report narrated by CBS news- 
man Howard K. Smith on experiments by gifted teachers. 

Danny Thomas, Sheldon Leonard and Louis Edelman 
are in joint venture deals to finance 3 pilots: A comedy 
starring Joey Bishop; All in a Day’s Work — a comedy 
starring Dick Van Dyke; and what Leonard describes as a 
“sociological comedy.” Leonard will produce all 3. Edel- 
man will be exec, producer of the Bishop show. 

WPIX N.Y.’s 60-min. documentary, “The Secret Life 
of Adolf Hitler,” now in syndication, has been issued as a 
J 50-pp. book by the Citadel Press. 



HOLLYWOOD ROUNDUP 



Heritage Productions plans 2 pilots. The Lady in Red, 
adventure starring Suzanne Lloyd, and the tentatively 
titled Ladies in Retirement, a comedy starring Estelle Win- 
wood & Gladys Cooper. Shirley Mellner is producer of the 
Lloyd pilot, Buddy Bregman of the comedy. In addition, 
Heritage Pres. Paul Benton tells us he plans to tape 26 
half-hours of The Buddy Bregman Show and four 60-min. 
specials. The first special, “The Song & Dance Man,” star- 
ring Dan Dailey & Jack Haley, has been taped. Next spe- 
cial is “The Jimmy McHugh Story,” being taped this month. 

Screen Gems has acquired the TV rights to “Gidget,” 
made as a movie by its parent company, Columbia Pictures, 
and will probably aim the comedy for the 1961-62 season. 
Exec, producer will be Harry Ackerman. Another new SG 
pilot is a 60-min. untitled action-adventure series. And 
Love & Kisses is the tentative title of the Todon Produc- 
tions comedy pilot starring Jeanne Crain, John Vivyan and 
Jack Mullaney, which goes into production Jan. 16. Tony 
Owen is the producer. 

Four Star pilots an untitled comedy starring Jimmy 
Durante & Eddie Hodges Jan. 16, and an untitled Orson 
Bean comedy based on a James Thurber property in Jan. 
or Feb. Also planned are a 60-min. Western pilot, to be 
produced by Vincent Fennelly, and a situation comedy with 
music, starring Jane Powell. Pepsi-Cola will sponsor a 
special with Miss Powell, plans to co-sponsor the Powell 
series, and is seeking an alternate sponsor. 

Filmaster Production pilots include Mr. In Between, 
a comedy; The Number One, a 60-min. newspaper drama; 
Crawford’s Key, action-adventure; Our Town, drama; an 
untitled sports show; The Swiss Family Robinson. Nat 
Perrin will be exec, producer of the various projects . . . 
Norman Alden & John Floria will co-produce a comedy 
mystery pilot, The Eye & I. 

U.S. & British writer guilds will be affiliated if mem- 
bers of Writers Guild of America approve this spring. 
WGA’s national council has already endorsed the proposed 
affiliation with the British Television & Screen Writers 
Guild, which has also approved the idea. It is aimed at 
establishing standard minimum & rerun fees, and closer 
relations in other areas. 

Revue Studios is considering filming some series in 
London, but hasn’t as yet acquired any properties for this 
purpose . . . Berwell Productions, in which Irving Cum- 
mings Jr., Arthur Lake and Ray Berwick are partnered, 
will pilot a comedy, The Rolling Stones, in February. 

Les Hafner Productions will pilot Pentagon, with De- 
fense Dept, cooperation. George Slavin will supervise the 
scripts of the action-adventure series . . . Wardson Pro- 
ductions, in which Ralph Edwards and Hal Hudson are 
partners, will pilot My Client Is Innocent. 

QM Productions will pilot The Impatient Years for 
ABC-TV this month. It’s a World War I story, dealing 
with the Lafayette Escadrille. Quinn Martin is producer 
. . . Arena Productions is developing a comedy-adventure 
pilot, 2 Is a Crowd. Norman Felton is producer. 

Nat Holt Productions plans to pilot a Western, still 
untitled . . . Warner Bros, has named King Features Syn- 
dicate its European rep for its TV and cartoon characters. 



12 



JANUARY 9, 1961 



NEW YORK ROUNDUP 



Add syndication sales: Ziv-UA’s Sea Hunt has passed 
the 100 mark in 4th-season sales — 104 markets to date. 
New-cycle sales include WHDH-TV Boston and WBRZ 
Baton Rouge. Ziv-UA also reports that Sea Hunt has aver- 
aged a 50.5% share of audience, based on a 55-market sur- 
vey over a 5-month period . . . CBS Films’ 26-program series, 
The Heckle & Jeckle Cartoon Show, offered for mid-winter 
syndication, has sold in 6 markets, including WNBQ-TV 
Chicago, WCCO-TV Minneapolis and KLZ-TV Denver . . . 
ITC’s new div., Javelin Productions, has sold Golf Tip of 
the Day in 42 markets, including WGN-TV Chicago, 
WHDH-TV Boston, WMAR-TV Baltimore . . . MCA-TV 
has picked up 6 additional markets for its mystery-adven- 
ture series, Shotgun Slade. 

The circus is getting pilot attention from the networks. 
CBS-TV has given Revue Studios an order for a 60-min. 
circus show for next season, and the studio has begun work 
on it. ABC-TV and 20th Century-Fox TV are negotiating 
a deal for another 60-min. project. The Circus, due for 
piloting. And while NBC-TV hasn’t yet made any commit- 
ment with a production company, it is developing a 60-min. 
show, The Big Tent, which would be filmed in color. 

Screen Gems’ Huckleberry Hound & friends will make 
their first “live” TV guest appearances early this year. 
Promotion kits containing costumes, a taped dialogue in 
the characters’ voices, an original song, local producer & 
talent instructions and Screen Gems’ suggestions for “pro- 
moting the promotion” will be offered to stations playing 
the Kellogg-sponsored Hanna-Barbera animated series. 

ITC has sold 6 Spanish-dubbed shows within the U.S. 
to KCOR-TV San Antonio, reports sales mgr. William P. 
Andrews. The series will be aimed at the large Texas 
Spanish-speaking audience as well as at viewers across the 
border in Mexico, beginning this week. The package in- 
cludes Ratnar of the Jungle and Last of the Mohicans. 

Program Sales Inc. and George Richfield will co-pro- 
duce & co-distribute Wally Bear, a new cartoon series “for 
all members of the viewing audience,” announced PSI Pres. 
Raymond Junkin. PSI is planning 130 segments of 5-min. 
length and 39 of 30-min. length to be offered for national & 
regional sponsorship. 

Production team of Ziv-UA, CBS-TV and Budd & Stu- 
art Schulberg will pilot Ross of the Everglades for a tele- 
series created by the Schulbergs. CBS, which is financing 
the on-location pilot, is reportedly considering the series 
for the 1961-62 season. 

NTA series, The Sheriff of Cochise and U.S. Marshal, 
are now being offered under the title of Man from Cochise. 
The new package combines 78 half-hour episodes from both 
series (produced by Desilu in association with NTA) and 
represents 4 years of production. 

El Camino Productions will pilot a comedy in March, 
with Parke Levy as producer. Levy is the creator of 
December Bride and Pete & Gladys. 

People: Ben Kranz has been named Robert Lawrence 
Productions vp & senior producer . . . Louis Mucciolo, ex- 
Robert Lawrence Productions vp, has been appointed exec, 
vp of Gerald Productions, the production div. of Advertis- 
ing, Radio & TV Services . . . John B. Burns named MGM- 
TV television sales vp. 



Educational Television 



Grant of nearly $2 million from Ford Foundation has 
been made to National ETV & Radio Center for the express 
purpose of equipping new ETV stations with video tape 
recorders, reported NET Pres. John F. White recently. 
Due to benefit by the $1,882,000 fund will be “the next 
25 non-commercial ETV stations that go on the air and 
become affiliated with NET by the end of 1962,” stated 
White. The new grant is similar to an earlier Ford Founda- 
tion donation of $2,706,000 made last year for TV-tape 
recorders. White stated that the new gift would serve as “a 
stimulus to put more ETV stations on the air.” The tape 
units are furnished under contract by Ampex. With each 
unit will go a year’s supply of tape. Four additional 
recorders for NET’s duplicating center at Ann Arbor, Mich, 
will also be provided under the Ford grant. More than half 
of NET’s 1961 offerings will be on tape, officials estimate. 
A gift of $250,000 worth of video tape by Minnesota Mining 
& Mfg. to supplement the Ford grant will be announced 
Jan. 11. 

Council on Medical TV will conduct its 3rd annual 
meeting April 6-7 at the National Institutes of Health, 
Bethesda, Md. There’ll be discussion of: (1) Use of open- 
circuit TV to supplement postgraduate medical education. 
(2) Role of medical schools in health-science programming 
for the public. (3) Status of medical TV research. (4) New 
TV equipment & installations. The meeting will be pre- 
ceded by a dental TV session April 5, the program to be 
coordinated by Dr. Michael T. Ramano, of Pa. School of 
Dentistry. The Council has offices at 33 E. 68th St., N.Y. 
Dr. Frank M. Woolsey Jr. is chmn.; John K. Mackenzie is 
exec. secy. 

Louis de Rochemont, a leading producer of documen- 
taries and business films, and D. C. Heath & Co., one of 
the country’s leading text book publishers, have formed a 
new partnership to produce ETV films. The company’s 
first project is Parlous Francais, a foreign-language course 
currently being distributed by the National ETV & Radio 
Center for 3rd & 4th grade students, whose production will 
be taken over by Heath-de Rochemont Corp. In the planning 
stages are Spanish- and Russian-language series. 

“The Impact of Educational Television” (U. of 111. 
Press, 247 pp., $5) comprises “significant research studies, 
conducted during the last 4 years at a number of univer- 
sities with the support of the National ETV & Radio 
Center” to inquire into “attitudes, motivations, audience 
composition, audience size, viewing habits, presentational 
patterns, attitude change, and learning — all relating to 
ETV.” The book is edited for NET by Wilbur Schramm, 
Stanford U. Institute for Communications Research dir. 

Kennedy news-conference films in their entirety will 
be telecast weekly on the 48 affiliated national ETV & 
radio stations. NET Pres. John F. White said last week 
that the films will be rushed to stations to be telecast the 
following day. He added that “the nation has a right to 
know the President’s views as they are presented, rather 
than as they are later picked apart.” 

Pa. statewide ETV network is in the exploratory stage, 
delegates to the Pa. Educational Assn, convention were 
advised recently. Charles H. Bohme, state superintendent 
of public instruction, said a study is being made of the 
advantages & applications of a network that would beam 
educational programs from Phila. to Pittsburgh & Erie, 



VOL. 17: No. 2 



13 



Television. Digest 

PUBLISHED BY TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. 

WALTER H. ANNENBERG, President 

PUBLICATION OFFICE Radnor, Pa., MUrray 8-3940, TWX: Radnor 1028 



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Personals: Francis Littlejohn has resigned as ABC-TV 
news & public affairs dir. John Madigan is named acting 
dir. to succeed Littlejohn. James C. Hagerty, White House 
press secy., will take over former news vp John Daly’s post 
Jan. 23. Frank La Tourette promoted from ABC News 
special projects producer to national news editor. 

William R. McAndrew, NBC News vp; William K. 
McDaniel, NBC Radio vp; Aaron Rubin, NBC vp & treas., 
all appointed exec. vps. Julian Goodman, NBC news & 
public affairs dir., named vp . . . Hamilton Shea, pres, of 
WSVA-TV Harrisonburg, Va., appointed chmn. of NAB 
committee to negotiate new TV-music agreement with 
ASCAP . . . Frederick S. Buschmeyer Jr., ex-KTVI St. 
Louis, appointed production mgr. of WRC-TV Washington. 

Lawrence E. Dennis, Pa. State U. vp, elected chmn. of 
JCET, succeeding Dr. Albert N. Jorgensen, U. of Conn, 
pres. Dr. Edgar Fuller, exec. secy, of the Council of Chief 
State School Officers, elected vice chmn. . . . Harold E. Hill, 
administrative vp of National Assn, of Educational Bcstrs., 
joins its Washington office March 1. 

Harry Trenner, ex-MBS, named dir. of Western sales 
development, RKO General . . . Irwin Lichtenstein, ex-NTA, 
named to new post of ad & sales development dir., Mutual 
Radio; Fred Kilian named sales service dir. Harbert J. 
Cutting appointed to head new commercial operations dept. 

. . . John Barrett, ex-KLYD-TV Bakersfield, joins KBAK- 
TV there as asst. gen. mgr. & national sales mgr. . . . 
Jack Pegler, Television Zoomar Co. pres., is currently 
on a business trip to Mexico, Central and South America. 

Named WOR vps: Martin S. Fliesler, WOR-TV & 
WOR ad dir.; George R. Jeneson, WOR-TV & WOR West- 
ern mgr.; and Jacques Biraben, radio WOR gen. sales mgr. 

Earl Harder promoted from traffic mgr. to new post of 
continuity acceptance dir., WNBC-TV & WNBC . . . Mark 
Woods, former ABC pres, recently in Sarasota, Fla. real 
estate, becomes vp-gen. mgr. of radio WSPB Sarasota 
which is headed by Pa. Lieut. Gov. John Morgan Davis. 

Jack S. Atwood promoted from station mgr., WCSH-TV 
Portland, Me., to gen. mgr., Me. Bcstg. System (WCSH-TV 
& WCSH, WLBZ-TV & WLBZ Bangor, radio WRDO 
Augusta). He is succeeded by Donald R. Powers. Bruce C. 
McGorrill appointed WCSH-TV sales mgr. 

Holt Gewinner Jr. named dir., WSB-TV (Atlanta) 
merchandising dept.; Jean Hendrix, asst, to gen. mgr., 
named also publicity & promotion supervisor. 



Richard Eaton will receive the Washington Ad Club’s 
“Award of Achievement” at a luncheon meeting in Wash- 
ington this week (Jan. 10). Speakers will be Sen. Jackson 
(D-Wash.) & Sen. Randolph (D-W.Va.). Asked for details, 
club Pres. Milton Q. Ford referred reporters to John Pan- 
agos, last year’s club pres., now vp of the Eaton stations. 
Panagos said the award is for Eaton’s “contributions to 
broadcasting.” He also said that Sen. Kefauver (D-Tenn.) 
had been scheduled as the principal speaker, but had to 
cancel because of a conflicting engagement. Recently, FCC 
gave 5 Eaton stations short-term licenses (less than 3 
years), the first granted, on grounds that Eaton hadn’t 
given them adequate personal supervision (Vol. 16:50 p3). 
The FCC split 4-3 on the decision — Comrs. Hyde, Craven & 
King dissenting. The ad club invited members of the 
Commission to attend the luncheon. Comrs. Hyde, Bartley 
& Lee accepted; Ford, Craven & Cross declined or had other 
engagements; King said he received no invitation. 

Networks 

NBC is canceling its affiliation contract with Chron- 
icle-owned KRON-TV San Francisco as of July 1, the net- 
work informed the station last week. Formal FCC applica- 
tion to acquire KTVU Oakland was also filed by NBC, al- 
though KRON-TV — continuing a down-to-the-wire fight 
against the NBC move — has started an anti-trust action to 
prevent the sale. Gen. mgr. Harold P. See of KRON-TV, 
however, plans to meet with NBC this month to discuss 
an interim affiliation. The planned purchase of KTVU by 
NBC has been in the works for a year (Vol. 16:1 p9). 

New CBS studio consolidation in N.Y. is planned by 
that network. The multi-million (at least $7.5 but not 
more than $15 million) project will be handled by Charles 
Luckman Associates, which designed CBS-TV’s big Holly- 
wood plant. Under the plan, CBS will put under one roof 
at 57th St. & 11th Ave. at least 7 studios (of the 15 now 
scattered around N.Y.) and new production facilities. 

ABC-TV & Radio o&o station mgrs. meet this week at 
the Balmoral Hotel, Miami Beach. ABC-TV executives, in- 
cluding AB-PT Pres. Leonard H. Goldenson, and ABC-TV 
Pres. Oliver Treyz will also meet the TV affiliates board. 



NETWORK SALES ACTIVITY 



ABC-TV 

American Bandstand, Mon.-Fri. 4-5:30 p.m., part. eff. May 
Plough (Lake-Spiro-Shurman) 

Walt Disney Presents, Sun. 6:30-7:30 p.m., part. eff. Jan. 

Dow Chemical (Norman, Craig & Kummel) 
Simoniz (Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample) 

Adventures in Paradise, Mon. 9:30-10:30 p.m.; Cheyenne, 
Mon. 7:30-8:30 p.m.; Roaring Twenties, Sat. 
7:30-8:30 p.m.; participations eff. this month 
Mennen (Grey) 

The Law and Mr. Jones, Fri. 10:30-11 p.m.; The Islanders, 
Sun. 9:30-10:30 p.m.; Roaring Twenties, Sat. 
7:30-8:30 p.m.; participations eff. this month 
Simoniz (Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample) 

NBC -TV 

The Square World of Jack Paar, Tue. Jan. 31, 10-11 p.m. 
The Emmy Awards, Tue. May 16, 10-11:30 p.m. 

How Tall Is a Giant, Thu. March 23, 7:30-8:30 p.m., repeat 
Procter & Gamble (Benton & Bowles) 




J4 



JANUARY 9, 1961 



• • 



MANUFACTURING, DISTRIBUTION, FINANCE 



TRADE & BUSINESS TRENDS AT MARKET TIME: The holiday season over, all levels 

of industry are now occupied with the traditional first-of-year business — (1) distributor & dealer meetings, (2) 
showing of new fill-in models, (3) trying to outguess everybody else. This year's International Home Fur- 
nishings Market opened in Chicago at week's end with an air of uncertainty — Christmas business established 
no records last year and there was little feeling that the first page of the new calendar would suddenly mean 
a rosier aspect for consumer hard-goods market. 

As the Mart opened, newspapers headlined the economic report to President-elect Kennedy by 
advisor Dr. Paul A. Samuelson stating that "we go into 1961 with business still moving downward," declining 
to forecast "exactly when this 4th post-war recession will come to an end," but predicting only a 1 % increase 
this year in Gross National Product. 

How manufacturers & merchandisers in consumer electronics intend to meet these economic facts of 
1961 life is just beginning to take form. At the Mart and at distributor & dealer meetings, and in conversa- 
tions <& correspondence with industryites, we found these first straws in the 1961 wind: 

Pricing: There's plenty of talk about GE's 19-in. transformer-powered portable at $159.95 (Vol. 17:1 
pi 5), some of it with overtones reminiscent of the same firm's 14-in. portable at $99, which won for it industry 
unit-sales leadership in 1956. It's still too early to say, but at press time there seemed to be no rush by com- 
petitors to meet this price — although Philco showed a new version of its 19-in. leader portable at the same 
price as its old one — $169.95 — to which the retailer presumably will add $1.75 under new 90-day parts-&- 
labor warranty policy. 

Nor does there seem to be large-scale trend to follow Zenith's fairly widespread TV & stereo price 
increases — yet. Price movements in early set introductions seem to be in both directions. In drop-ins & face- 
lifts, there's a tendency to slight melting of list prices at the low ends, somewhat higher prices in middle-of- 
line merchandise. Some of the lower prices are due to the introduction of 92-degree tubes and wider use of 
non-bonded tubes by some manufacturers. 

Examples of these price trends in TV: Motorola introduced 23-in. table model at $199.95, about $20 
lower than its earlier 23-in. table sets. Sylvania's cheapest 19-in. set which has a suggested list is priced af 
$189.95 vs. that company's previous low of $199.95. In radio, too — low-end prices are dropping a few dollars 
(example, Philco's clock radio at $19.95), going up somewhat in the center of the line (GE's new clock radio at 
$36.95 vs. former one at $34.95). 

New Set Innovations: Tuners are coming in for a lot of attention this year — apparently the 
snow-free picture's the thing. In addition to RCA's New Vista and Zenith's Gold Video Guard already men- 
tioned, we now see a new low-noise tuner in Sylvania's 4 new sets, new Golden M chassis in Motorola's new 
low-end sets, still more sensitive 4-wafer frame-grid tuner in other Motorola sets. In tube sizes there is little 
new — except that Du Mont is returning to the 27-in. with a lowboy at $450. (Details of new sets on p. 17.) 

Picture Tube Dispute: Although the industry has accepted 19- & 23-in. tubes, it's plain that some 
didn't think the change was necessary — and there's lots of argument over various methods of providing 
implosion protection (bonded vs. non-bonded). Outspoken Magnavox Pres. Frank Freimann, opponent of 
annual model changes & "planned obsolescence," makes no bones about his views on what's happening to 
picture tubes and on Coming's "Operation Snowball" promotion campaign: 

“It’s about time the leaders of the industry realize that ’all the people can’t be fooled all the time,’ ” 



VOL. 17: No. 2 



15 



says Freimann. "The history of our misadventures shows this. In my opinion, the industry's shrinkage in 
sales & profits last year was at least partly attributable to the all-out promotion of the 23-in. 'square-cornered' 
tube sets. The consumer benefits here are not proportionate to the increased cost. We did succeed, through 
advertising claims, in convincing the public that the 17- & 21 -in. sets were obsolete, with the consequence 
that almost half the 1960 TV sales (17- <& 21-in.) were sold at liquidation, and there were fewer TV receivers 
sold than in 1959. 

"There is ample evidence of public resentment against planned obsolescence. 'Operation Snowball' 
is going to add fuel to the fire. Magnavox will resist it just as vigorously as Corning will promote it." As to 
other manufacturers, Freimann says: "Let them do as they like, but we resent and will resist any attempt to 
drive our industry into a comer in an effort to develop a monopoly on claims of superiority [for the 
bonded tube] ." The Magnavox president insists that his company obtains "a superior picture as to definition 
& contrast, using a conventional tube and an effective filter safety glass." (Note: Corning has changed the 
emphasis of "Snowball" to promote modern TV in general, dropping its stress on bonded tubes.) 

Color Activity: Road to profits in the '60s lies in color, RCA insists. Big dealer wingding in N.Y. 
last weekend celebrated pledges of retailers in 67 RCA distributor areas to sell at least 51,501 color sets dur- 
ing the 4-month period ending Feb. 28. RCA Sales Corp. Chmn.-Pres. W. Walter Watts told them that with 
the anticipated improvement in the economic situation, "our dealers should sell double this volume in the 4th 
quarter of 1961 alone." And he added: "If you can multiply that quarter by 3 or 4, we all ought to make a lot 
of money." 

RCA Chmn. Sarnoff & Pres. Burns addressed the dealer dinner at the Waldorf Astoria, beating the 
drums for the profitability of color. Plainly the highlight of the dinner was Gen. Sarnoff 's free-swinging off- 
the-cuff talk in which he compared today's non-color TV manufacturers with the phonograph makers who 
refused to recognize & adopt radio, and with the radio makers who failed to recognize the potential of TV. 
He let dealers in on a little Sarnoff-type history-in-the-making, too, when he indicated that preparations are 
being made for an event reminiscent of RCA's introduction of TV at the 1939 N.Y. World's Fair: 

"We look forward to the privilege of inaugurating international TV in color at the 1964 N.Y. World's 
Fair. From a technical standpoint, I am certain that the date is feasible, that it will be possible to televise the 
Fair opening in natural color over remote parts of the world by means of a satellite communications sys- 
tem." (For details of Gen. Sarnoff's remarks, see p. 18.) 

• • • • 

Note: EIA's TV-radio production figures for 1960's final week, due at last week's end, have been 
delayed by slow reporting of some participants. The final week's figures, plus a roundup of the year's TV & 
radio production will appear here next week. 



Magnavox has closed its Paducah, Ky. manufacturing 
plant, which employed some 700 in the production of TV- 
radio-phono loudspeakers and electrolytic capacitors. Mag- 
navox explained that “wage rates & not enough return on 
our investment account for the closing.” The $2-million 
plant was built in 1948. Because of labor difficulties & 
declining profits, Magnavox is discontinuing the capacitors 
line produced at Paducah, but may continue making 
speakers. Magnavox has been involved for 3 years in 
almost continuous arbitration of contract provisions with 
the IUE which represents employes at the Paducah plant. 

Warwick’s striking IUE employes ended their 3-week 
walkout at the Zion, 111. TV plant Jan. 3 after approving a 
new 2-year agreement. The pact provides an 8$ pay in- 
crease the first year, 5<S the 2nd. The strike, involving over 
1,000, began Dec. 8. Warwick is controlled by Sears, Roe- 
buck; makes home-entertainment equipment for the chain. 

EIA guide book to assist contractors in settling con- 
tract terminations is planned by the association’s military 
relations dept. Heading the project is Collins Radio’s Edwin 
James, chmn. of EIA’s terminations committee. 



Philco has acquired a “substantial minority interest” 
in Bendix Home Appliance France, a major manufacturer 
of refrigerators & laundry appliances in the French market. 
International div. Pres. Harvey Williams has also reported 
the appointment of J. J. M. van der Hagen to the new post 
of managing dir. of Philco’s Swiss subsidiary, Philco Corp. 
S.A., of Fribourg. He will have “full responsibility for the 
development & coordination of all Philco interests on the 
Continent & in Great Britain, including the licensees & 
subsidiaries of Philco Corp. S.A. and approximately 20 
distributors of Philco products in European countries where 
local manufacturing does not exist.” 

FM radio sales will increase 30-to-40% in 1961 over an 
estimated 1 million sold in 1960, Granco Pres. Henry Fogel 
predicted last week. He pointed out that production of FM 
radios rose 80% over 1959 last year, compared with a 10% 
increase for all radios. He also forecast a market “soon” 
for 100,000 FM auto radios a year. 

Canada’s Dominion Electrohome Industries is extend- 
ing its warranties to one year from 90 days on all TVs, 
radios, phonos. 



1G 



JANUARY 9, I9B1 



TV & RADIO SALES DOWN: November saw a drop in 

both TV & radio retail sales from Nov. 1959, official 
EIA figures confirmed last week. As reported in pre- 
liminary estimates last month, TV sales were down 
about 12% for the month, and radio’s retail drop was 
its first for 1960 (Vol. 16:52 p23). November’s radio 
sales were 7% below the figure for Nov. 1959. 

For the year’s first 11 months, however, radio sales 
were well above 1959, while TV retail sales were less than 
3% ahead of last year’s cumulative figure — indicating that 
full-year 1960 retail TV sales will be extremely close to 
1959’s 5,749,000 unit sales. Although 11-month TV produc- 
tion was well down from last year, output of uhf-equipped 
sets was higher. The official EIA production & retail sales 
figures with 1959 comparisons: 

TELEVISION 



Total Production Uhf Production Retail Sales 

Month 1960 1959 I960 1959 1960 1959 

January .... 626,494 437,026 50,119 35,841 690,867 501,704 

February .... 603,453 459,492 43,537 34,678 507,673 448,173 

March 549,500 494,032 45,411 32,112 501,829 425,761 

April 422,551 389,251 39,240 20,601 351,214 263,998 

May 442,176 431,911 32,295 28,247 334,283 279,636 

June 518,870 671,004 34,245 29,064 371,661 344,795 

July 268,864 350,360 14,621 21.022 392,858 370,676 

August 462,286 547,445 26,829 32,847 429,346 492,449 

September .. 678,937 808.337 46,161 51,555 620,810 684,773 

October .... 499,999 706,503 38,999 55,113 654,478 637,147 

November .. 429,757 560,770 34,381 46,544 521,886 698,070 



TOTAL .. 5,302,877 5,756,210 405,838 387,524 5,176,905 5,046,971 

RADIO 



Auto Radio Retail Sales 

Total Production Production (excl. auto) 

Month 1960 1959 1960 1959 1960 1959 

January .... 1,356,788 1,124,737 632,461 420,052 803,388 700,490 

February .... 1,442,368 1,125,385 696,872 432,661 611,479 474,888 

March 1,667,650 1,347,554 633,761 511,219 664,441 515,563 

April 1,230,323 1,040,183 399,963 422,346 547,839 388,863 

May 1,277,040 1,039,562 463,165 476,222 648,322 400,882 

June 1,551,451 1,430,165 596,870 637,806 702,889 678,195 

July 890,369 829,035 328,009 264,726 673,363 526,827 

August 1,048,406 1,009,423 340,860 279,424 794,608 671,713 

September .. 1,945,092 1,981,208 788,961 717,601 1,102,092 928,457 

October .... 1,727,560 1,795,718 639,357 531,116 1,036,333 839,912 

November .. 1,468,847 1,346,079 491,026 290.81S 941,521 1,016,634 



TOTAL ..15,604,784 14,069,049 5,911,305 4,973,777 8,326,275 7,142,424 



FM radio production (1969 figures in parentheses) : Jan. 33,816 

(30,235), Feb. 66,516 (29,146), March 83,127 (32,994), April 68,196 

(31,425), May 65,438 (48,841), June 105,817 (60,783), July 49,707 

(24,553), Aug. 71,125 (42,866), Sept. 111,745 (76,942). Oct. 88,596 

(62,959), Nov. 86,323 (50,131). Eleven-month total: 852,329 (480,894). 

* * * 



TV-RADIO EXPORTS & IMPORTS: U.S. exports of TV sets 

continued to climb in September, latest Commerce 
Dept, estimates indicated. There were 8,164 complete 
receivers & 3,873 chassis shipped — a total value of 
$1,289,189. Most other consumer electronics exports 
shared in the seasonal rise. 

The import figures for September — not directly com- 
parable with export statistics because of different product 
classifications & definitions— don’t list TV sets. This 
doesn’t mean there were no imports of TV into the U.S. 
during the month — 2,300 were shipped here from Japan 
(Vol. 16:48 pl8) — but simply that the Commerce Dept, 
hasn’t yet established a commodity classification for them 
in its import statistics. 

Here are summaries of selected Commerce Dept, elec- 
tronics export & import data for Sept. 1960 (for August 
figures, see Vol. 16:48 pl8). 



U.S. EXPORTS— SEPTEMBER 1960 



Product 


Units 


Value 


TV receivers 


8,164 


$1,147,048 


TV chassis 


3,873 


142,141 


Auto radios 


5,007 


90,849 


Home radios 


10,407 


286,705 


Radio chassis 


1,754 


42,432 


Radio-phonos 


593 


57,804 


Phonographs 


2,897 


181,716 


Coin-op. phonos .. 
Recorders 


1,376 


866,704 


& parts 

TV picture 


— 


1,119,630 


tubes 


132,011 


2,787,371 


Receiving tubes .. 
Transistors, 


1,985,363 


1,538,207 


diodes 

TV transmitters 


933,057 


1,249,554 


& parts 


— 


254,774 


TV studio equip. 


— 


785,438 


TV camera tubes 


136 


96,544 



Biggest Customer 
Venezuela (1,962 at $292,760) 
Argentina, Philippines, Spain 
Mexico (3,312 at $47,656) 
Canada (4,444 at $113,444) 
Viet Nam (1,000 at $26,730) 
Venezuela (133 at $22,371) 
Venezuela (1,261 at $60,017) 
W. Germany (895 at $266,964) 

Canada ($222,190) 

Argentina (25,683 at $560,366) 
Canada, Argentina 

Canada, U.K. 

Argentina ($81,214) 

Canada ($223,805) 

Canada, Japan 



U.S. IMPORTS— SEPTEMBER 1960 



Product Units Value Biggest Supplier 

Transistor radios 668,193 55,273,290 Japan (661,294 at $5,194,414) 
Portable tube 

radios 13,585 109,307 Japan (12,546 at $85,300) 

Other radios 139,671 1,269,520 Japan (123,262 at $805,260) 

Radio-phonos 9,817 866,001 W. Germany (6,905 at $738,600) 

Phonographs 2,141 64,743 Japan (1,015 at $21,042) 

W. Germany (299 at $22,983) 

Changers, 

turntables — 1,243,863 U.K. (991.133) 

TV apparatus — 178,469 Switzerland ($76,255) 

TV tubes & parts — 11,367 Not given 

Radio tubes 2,604,042 944.675 Netherlands ($404,055) 

Radio apparatus.. — 1,138,834 Japan ($597,855) 

TV cameras, 

parts — 193,425 U.K. ($92,855) 



Factory picture-tube sales declined seasonally in Nov- 
ember from October’s volume. However, sales also dropped 
markedly from the year before: 732,359 units at $14,625,632 
in Nov. 1960 vs. 840,866 units at $16,058,816 in Nov. 1959. 
The same sales pattern applied for receiving-tubes — down 
seasonally in November from October, and also below the 
year-ago level. Nov.-1960 sales were 30,024,000 units at 
$25,627,000, compared with Nov.-1959’s 37,211,000 units at 
$31,600,000. In year-to-date reckonings, picture-tube sales 
trailed the 1959 cumulative in units, but ran ahead in dollar 
volume. Receiving tubes were behind the year-ago pace 
both in units & dollars. EIA’s figures for November & 
year-to-date. 

Picture Tubes Receiving Tubes 

Units Dollars Units Dollars 



January 795,250 $16,831,430 31,367,000 $26,872,000 

February 741,233 14,495,480 32,734,000 27,881,000 

March 794,375 15,654,281 36,382,000 31,751,000 

April 707,262 13,782,769 29,737,000 26,759,000 

May 659,859 13,329,826 30,354,000 25.680,000 

June 756,827 15,605,481 33,916,000 29,065,000 

July 681,786 13,898,468 34,883,000 28,810,000 

August 928,164 18,843,067 38,540,000 31,702,000 

September 913,496 18,345,103 34,612,000 28,007,000 

October ... 771,324 15,478,435 33,506,000 27,628,000 

November 732,369 14,625,632 30,024,000 25,627,000 



Jan.-Nov. 1960 8.481,924 $169,789,972 365,989,000 $308,171,000 

Jan.-Nov. 1959 8,705,769 167,830,882 395,688,000 336,471,000 



* * * 

World market for U.S. tubes & semiconductors con- 
tinues to be good, despite lower-priced competition, accord- 
ing to a recent survey by the Electronics Div. of Commerce 
Dept.’s Business & Defense Services Administration. The 
last report in the 28-country study sees U.S. tube and/or 
semiconductor exports holding their level or expanding to 
Australia, Canada, Netherlands, New Zealand & Spain. 
Difficulties or declines may be met in Taiwan, Turkey, 
Union of South Africa and West Germany. In Japan, U.S. 
companies are benefiting from technological pacts & licens- 
ing deals. The latest report, covering 10 countries, is titled 
Electron Tubes & Semiconductors — Production, Consump- 
tion, Trade, Selected Foreign Countries — available for 30? 
from U.S. Govt. Printing Office or Commerce Dept, offices. 



Boycott of Japanese fabrics is threatened by the 
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America to force 
Nippon manufacturers to limit their shipments of finished 
garments. The union’s general executive board, at its 
Feb. 13 meeting, will consider a motion that ACWA 
members stop cutting fabrics from Japan after May 1. 



VOL 17: No. 2 



17 



Tubes & Semiconductors in 1961: Sales of TV picture 

tubes will be about the same as in 1960, receiving tubes 
will decline, and semiconductors will set another record. 
That’s the tube & semiconductor outlook for 1961 as fore- 
cast by GE electronic components div. vp-gen. mgr. L. 
Berkley Davis, who also is EIA president. 

Predicting from his GE vantage point, Davis sees 1961 
domestic factory sales of about 11 million picture tubes at 
approximately $205 million — about the same as 1960. 
Replacements constitute 45% of this. Of the remaining 
55% — earmarked for new TV sets — about 6 out of every 
10 will be in 23-in. types, with perhaps one-third in 19-in. 
types. Davis expects no deflection angles wider than today’s 
110- & 114-degree tubes, but he sees a possibility that the 
trend to 92-degree tubes “may become more pronounced as 
styling advantages are de-emphasized in the interest of 
improved reliability & lower circuit costs.” 

The GE executive forecasts “an increase in number of 
sets employing tubes with integral implosion protection.” 

( Later in 1961, he says, “these will include other approaches 
than the present [Corning-type] bonded-glass construc- 
I tion.” He forecasts “additional introduction of truly por- 
i table transistorized sets,” but no significant quantities of 
special picture tubes for these. As to color, he sees a 
continuation of 1960’s “small, steady increase,” but no 
“important gains” without a “major tube innovation, not 
now foreseen.” 

Davis’s other predictions: 

Semiconductor sales will reach $626 million — 19% 
higher than 1960’s estimated $528 million. These sales are 
broken down this way: Transistors, 180 million (38% 
over last year’s 130 million) at $360 million (20% above 
last year’s $300 million) — $50 million consumer, $130 mil- 
lion industrial, $180 million military. Semiconductor 
rectifiers, a record $136 million, up 16% from 1960’s $116 
million. Tunnel diode sales will continue to be “modest.” 
Receiving tube sales will total 385 million at $322 
million — about 4% below last year’s 400 million at $340 
million. Power tube sales, $300 million, 4% over 1960’s 
sales. The military market “will experience a breakthrough 
in superpower tubes for defense radar, satellite tracking & 
j space communications.” 






EIA has begun distribution of Plus Values (Vol. 16:49 
pl9), “a booklet dedicated to the proposition that it pays 
to do business with U.S. electronics manufacturers.” 
Prepared by EIA’s tube & semiconductor div., it empha- 
sizes for OEMs & distributors the advantages of buying 
American-made tubes & semiconductors. The booklet is 
being distributed to 30,000 industry executives, govt, 
officials, distributors, purchasing agents, design engineers. 
Philco vp William J. Peltz, chmn. of the EIA div., noted: 
“Thousands of jobs in the U.S. industry already have been 
lost to foreign producers paying wages a fraction of those 
received by American workmen. In the Chicago area alone, 
according to a report to EIA from a labor union official, 
foreign imports have been the primary cause of a 20% 
decline in employment among 14 electronics manufacturing 
companies” • National Electrical Mfrs. Assn, took dire 
note recently of mounting battery imports. Its dry battery 
section called for “remedial govt, action” and announced 
it would launch an educational program for battery buyers. 

Japanese-made electrical equipment has been misrepre- 
sented as domestic by 2 affiliated Rochester, N.Y. firms — 
Dialand Electric Sales Corp. & Elkee Corp. — according to 
an FTC complaint. 



More about 

NEW SETS INTRODUCED: Some lower prices in newly 

introduced promotional & low-end items, but a tendency 
to price firmness otherwise, is the continuing pattern in 
new models introduced last week (see p. 14). In TV, 
there’s a definite trend toward use of more sensitive 
low-noise tuners, even in relatively low-priced models. 
Here’s a summary of last week’s new-set highlights : 

Motorola — Four TVs, all with new “Golden M” chassis, 
full-year warranty. 23-in. table model, $199.95; step-up 
model with more sensitive 4-wafer tuner, $219.95; 19-in. 
portable (face-lift), $199.95; 19-in. remote-control compact, 
$249.95 to $269.95. Also introduced “largest & most com- 
plete line of car radios ever presented to distributors,” at 
$39.95 to $125. 

Philco — One 19-in. portable at $169.95 and a compact 
19-in. at $199.95. Seven 23-in. sets, 4 of them with open list. 
Philco announced that it is continuing its battery portable 
Safari. Also dropped in is a new 42-in. wide stereo hi-fi 
console at $199.95 to $219.95. Radio additions include a 
new price-leader 4-tube table model at $17.95, a clock radio 
at $19.95, step-up transistor portables at $34.95 & $39.95. 

GE — Compact console phono, with or without AM-FM 
tuner, unpriced. In radio line, GE added an FM-only table 
model at $39.95, a 5-transistor portable at $29.95, a clock 
radio at $36.95. 

Sylvania — Four TVs with new low- noise tuner & 
bonded-shield tube. Price leader is 19-in. open-list table 
model, with step-up at $189.95, a 19-in. consolette is 
$299.95, consoles $259.95 & $279.95 (HaloLight). 

Du Mont — A new 27-in. lowboy at $450 (remote $550) 
and three 23-in. consoles with basic list prices of $299. 

Radio import highlights — Two new sets from Japan 
look hot: (1) The Matsushita “Portalarm” 6-transistor 
pocket radio with 7-jewel watch alarm (including slumber 
switch) at $49.95. (2) Delmonico’s 5-tube AM radio listing 
at $9.95. A report on the activities of 2 TV importers will 
be featured in next week’s issue. 



New plants & expansions: Cornell-Dubilier Electronics 
div. of Federal Pacific Electric is transferring its corporate 
hq to Newark, N.J. from South Plainfield, N.J. Some pro- 
duction activities will be continued at the South Plainfield 
location • Thompson Ramo Wooldridge’s subsidiary, 
Space Technology Labs, has sold to the government for 
$23.5 million 9 buildings on a 14-acre site in El Segundo, 
Cal. Space Technology will continue to use the facilities 
pending completion, by 1962, of its new $25-million research 
center at nearby Redondo Beach (Vol. 16:50 pl8) • 
Beckman Instruments has begun construction of a $1.3- 
million, 100,000-sq.-ft. facility for its systems div. at Fuller- 
ton, Cal. The new plant, for production of electronic data- 
processing systems, is slated for May completion • Gen- 
eral Instrument has opened its new $3-million, 50,000-sq.-ft. 
semiconductor production plant & research center at Hicks- 
ville, N.Y. Chmn. Martin H. Benedek reports the facility 
will be in “large-scale” production early this year • GE 
will spend more than $1 million in 1961 to enlarge the hq 
plant of its communications-products dept, at Lynchburg, 
Va. The plant produces 2-way radios, microwave gear. 
GE also is planning a $1.5-million R&D lab for computers 
at Sunnyvale, Cal., near San Francisco • Muntz TV will 
build a $1 million, single-story, 86,000-sq.-ft. hq & pro- 
duction plant in Wheeling Township, 111., near Evanston. 
The plant will be completed around June 1. 






18 



JANUARY 9, 1961 



More about 

GEN. SARNOFF & COLOR: The nation's top sellers of 
color TV gathered in N.Y. as guests of RCA for a week- 
end of business & fun, beginning with a kick-off dinner 
Thursday (5) and an off-the-cuff address by the great- 
est color salesman of them all — RCA Chmn. Brig. Gen. 
David Sarnoff (see p. 15). 

The dealers plainly enjoyed it as the General, in a 
mellow & reminiscent mood, discarded his prepared speech 
and recalled the early days of wireless, then swung out at 
the detractors of color. He put them in the same class 
with movie producers who wouldn’t accept sound, phono 
manufacturers who believed radio was a fad, and radio 
makers who brushed aside TV itself. 

Surrounded by a speakers’ table full of RCA’s top 
brass, he attacked rival TV manufacturers’ “fear” of 
color, and their willingness to let others do the pioneering. 
“You would think that those in the business would be the 
first to embrace its possibilities.” And he served notice: 
“There is no turning back ... no possibility of color being 
a ‘fad.’ ” He provoked chuckles when he chided “one 
manufacturer who shall remain nameless for friendly 
reasons,” who had called Sarnoff a “televisionary” and 
said “TV would never get anywhere.” 

“I still like the future better than I do the past,” said 
the RCA chairman. Then, in a conversational aside, he 
went back to the past to confide that he had been involved 
in payola, vintage 1906. “I can tell you of payola as far 
back as 55 years ago,” he said, referring to his days with 
the old Marconi Wireless Telegraph Co. “We engaged in 
payola then and bribed captains of ships with a gold watch 
in order to get them to install wireless.” They were 
naturally reluctant to give up their sovereignty to an 
owner’s command from the shore. He related this reluct- 
ance to accept radio in the early days to other industry 
instances of resistance to change. 

Because such large phono makers as the Victor Talk- 
ing Machine Co. refused to enter the radio business, he 
said, “musical equipment dealers were prevented from 
handling radios. Instead, the electrical dealers got the 
business.” In a reference to RCA’s purchase of Victor with 
its “His Master’s Voice” trademark, he quipped: “What 
happened then? The little dog changed his master.” 

Pres. John S. Burns told the dealers that color sales 
in some major markets are now approaching 5% of total 
sets in circulation. Reiterating that color TV, including 
servicing, parts, etc., “is more than a $100-million-a-year- 
industry,” he stated that color TV reached this point in 6 
years, “while automobiles took 12 and oil 40 to get there.” 

“The past 6 years have seen a clear-cut initial victory 
in our race to establish color TV on a profitable basis,” he 
said, after he and Gen. Sarnoff accepted from the dealers 
a bound volume of pledges to sell at least 51, 501 color sets 
during the current 4-month period ending Feb. 28. 

Pledges were read off at the dinner meeting by dealers 
in each distribution area. Among the higher ones: Los 
Angeles, 4,489 sets; Chicago, 4,167; N.Y., 3,752; Phila- 
delphia, 2,989; San Francisco, 1,700; Newark, 1,586. 



Obituary 

Mrs. Eldridge R. Johnson, 90, widow of the founder of 
the Victor Talking Machine Co., died Jan. 3 at her Bryn 
Mawr, Pa. home. Her husband, whose company was 
merged with RCA, died in 1945. 



Trade Personals: Malter s. Bopp promoted from mktg. 

dir. to new post of vp-gen. mgr., Philco International div. 
. . . H. G. Place retires as chmn. of General Precision 
Equipment Corp., continuing as a consultant & dir. . . . 
Forrest W. Price, ex-Sylvania Home Electronics, appointed 
vp & gen. mgr., General Time Corp. 

Harold Schulman promoted from mktg. mgr. to vp & 
gen. mgr., Knight Electronics, mfg. subsidiary of Allied 
Radio Corp. . . . Michael J. Marino named mktg. mgr., 
International Resistance Co.’s major industrial distributor 
program . . . David D. Bulkley, ex-ITT, named intercom- 
munication-systems product mgr., Stromberg-Carlson com- 
mercial products div. 

Ralph L. Bloom promoted from radio & high fidelity 
sales mgr. to district sales mgr., Sylvania Home Electronics 
Los Angeles office: Gerald P. Goetten appointed his asst. 
. . . Walter Boiko named senior sales engineer, Eitel-Mc- 
Cullough, headquartering in N.Y. . . . John J. Bohrer, 
International Resistance research dir., named a fellow, N.Y. 
Academy of Sciences. 

Max Zagoren named electronics mgr., N.Y. div. of John 

M. Otter Co. (Philco distributor in Pa., N.J. & N.Y.). He 
succeeds Joe O’Brien, resigned . . . George Capsis, ex-IBM 
and Univac div. of Remington Rand, named RCA presenta- 
tions & exhibits mgr.; B. J. Mezger named mgr. of RCA 
Service Company’s new Eastern mktg. region, with hq in 
Washington . . . Kurt E. Hellfach named mktg. research 
mgr., GE radio receiver dept. 

Edmond P. DiGiannantonio, Raytheon, named chmn., 
EIA military mktg. data committee . . . Donald J. Harring- 
ton named mktg. mgr., GE capacitor dept., Hudson Falls, 

N. Y. . . . Frank A. Saikley appointed controller, Indiana 
General Corp.; Richard S. Laney named div. controller, 
Indiana Steel Products div. . . . Wilbur S. Hinman Jr., 
technical dir. of Army’s Diamond Ordnance Fuze Labs, 
Washington, receives President’s Gold Medal Award for 
distinguished civilian service in developing new electronic 
techniques for military & civilian use. 



Microwave “will take giant steps in 1961,” forecasts 
Dec. 25 N.Y. Times, adding: “Up to now, the growth of the 
private microwave field has been limited by restrictive 
licensing by the FCC. In September, the Commission threw 
out all bars to large-scale development in a momentous 
decision. Licenses now are being issued to virtually any 
business organization wishing to set up a microwave 
system . . . Some leaders in the electronics industry esti- 
mate [private microwave communications] will gross $2 
billion a year in 5 years.” • Microwave’s financial picture 
and some of its smaller specialist companies are profiled 
by Dec. 29 Herald Tribune. Profiled: Douglas Microwave, 
Microwave Associates, Narda Microwave, Premier Micro- 
wave, Varian Associates. 

“Total market for electronic equipment utilizing micro- 
wave devices is expected to climb from last year’s $2 
billion to $5 billion by 1965,” reports Jan. 4 Financial 
World. Describing the microwave field as “one of the most 
promising branches of electronics,” the publication notes: 
“It’s estimated, for example, that 10,000 microwave sta- 
tions may be in operation by 1966, as compared with less 
than 3,000 at present.” The magazine lists the earnings of 
14 companies “which concentrate a large measure of their 
activities in the field.” 

TV & radio equipment duties have been removed by 
Nicaragua in line with new import policies. Special import 
permits from the Ministry of Finance are required, however. 



VOL. 17: No. 2 



19 



Finance 

National Co., Malden, Mass, manufacturer of military 
& industrial communications equipment & electronic prod- 
ucts, has revised its earlier forecast of sharply improved 
1960 earnings. In view of an anticipated sales drop to 
about $11 million from $12.9 million in 1959, Pres. Joseph 
H. Quick now anticipates only a slight improvement over 
1959’s per-share earnings of about 39 cents. He described 
1961’s prospects as “very good,” said sales could climb to 
$13-to-16 million. Quick also reported that National soon 
will announce the acquisition of a commercial electronic 
components company. 

Seven electronics companies are profiled by Dec. 21 
Financial World in an analysis entitled “Bright Prospects 
for These Electronics.” The 7 : Beckman Instruments, 

Clevite, Daystrom, General Instrument, General Precision 
Equipment, Litton Industries, Varian Associates. Notes 
the magazine: “Here are 7 well-situated electronics issues 
that still have long range speculative possibilities. Al- 
though liberally priced, most are down from higher levels.” 

Boonton Electronics Corp., Morris Plains, N.Y. maker 
of precision measuring equipment, plans public sale of 
60,000 common stock shares & attached warrants, according 
to an SEC registration statement (File 2-17411). Under- 
written by Ross, Lyon & Co. Inc. and Globus Inc., the sale 
will be in units of one share plus % of a 2-year warrant. 
One full warrant will be required to purchase one share 
at $5.50 the first year, $6.50 the 2nd year. 

Rixon Electronics Inc., Silver Spring, Md. producer of 
specialized electronic equipment, plans a 115,000-share of- 
fering of capital stock for public sale, according to an SEC 
registration statement (File 2-17441). An additional 10,000 
shares will be sold by Pres. James L. Hollis to underwriter 
Auchinloss, Parker & Redpath. Price & underwriting terms 
weren’t disclosed in the SEC application. 

20th Century-Fox has agreed to sell to the Rank Organ- 
ization its 49% share of theater firm Gaumont British. 
Price: $11.2 million. Terms: $1.4 million now, the balance 
payable in installments over 11 years at 4%% interest. 
Among 20th’s reasons for selling: “We had a minority in- 
terest and the return has not been very great,” a spokes- 
man explained. 

Emerson Pres. Benjamin Abrams says he knows of no 
corporate development to account for the recent strength & 
activity of the company’s stock. Earnings in the 1960 fiscal 
year ended Oct. 31 “were not as good” as the preceding 
fiscal, he notes, because of general consumer-market 
conditions during the summer & fall. Nov.-Dee. sales, 
however, were “better” than during the 2 year-ago months. 

Vacuum-Electronics, Plainview, N.Y. maker of electron 
tubes, vacuum systems, other electronic devices & compon- 
ents, has filed with SEC a registration statement for a 
proposed offering of 100,000 shares of common stock. Leh- 
man Brothers was named principal underwriter. Proceeds 
from the proposed offering would be used for expansion. 

International Resistance is “definitely interested in 
acquiring a semiconductor company,” reports Pres. W. W. 
Slocum. He estimates a record profit of “about $2 million 
or $1.40 a share” on sales of $22 million last year, compared 
with $1.8 million ($1.29) earned on $19.8-million sales in 
the year ended Jan. 3, 1960. 

Electronic & Missile Facilities has been listed for 
trading on the American Stock Exchange. Symbol: EMF. 



Milo Electronics Corp., N.Y., wholesaler & distributor 
of electronics parts, plans public sale of 150,000 common 
stock shares through Myron A. Lomasney & Co. at $5 per 
share. An SEC registration statement (File 2-17416) said 
$601,500 proceeds would be added to the company’s general 
funds to pay debts and increase inventory. 

Wells Television, the N.Y. TV-set leasing company that 
was acquired last March by Tishman Realty & Construction 
(Vol. 16:19 p23), is expected to contribute to Tishman’s 
profit picture a cash flow of more than $1 million annually 
and the tax advantage of heavy depreciation write-offs, 
according to Tishman Pres. Norman Tishman. 

W. L. Maxson will change its name to Maxson Elec- 
tronics Corp., subject to stockholder approval at the Jan. 
17 annual meeting. The N.Y. manufacturer of electronic 
equipment & components also will ask for authorization to 
double the number of common shares to 2 million. 

Technical Materiel Corp., Mamaroneck, N.Y. manufac- 
turer of high-frequency radio components & systems, has 
been listed on American Stock Exchange. Symbol: TM. 

Perkin-Elmer has been listed for trading on the New 
York Stock Exchange. Symbol: PKN. 

Esquire Radio & Electronics is slated for listing on the 
American Stock Exchange Jan. 12. Symbol: EE. 




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JANUARY 9, 1961 



Financial Reports of TV-Electronics Companies 

These are latest reports as obtained daring the last week. Dash indicates the information was not available at press time. Parentheses denote loss. 



Company 


Period 


Sales 


Pre-Tax 

Earnings 


Net Earnings 


Per 

Common 

Share 


Common 

Shares 


Electronic Communications 


1960 — year to Sept. 30 


$24,130,561 


$(1,062,511) 


$ (607, 511) 1 




597,209 




1959 — year to Sept. 30 


32,771,830 


1,761,605 


855,139 


$1.40 2 


590,076 


A. C. Nielsen 


1960 — qtr. to Nov. 30 


8,442,818 




559,031 


.33 






1959 — qtr. to Nov. 30 


7,286,006 




484,788 


.28 




Screen Gems* 


1960 — year to June 25 


41,690,402 




1,620,017 


.72 


2,250,000 




1959 — year to June 27 


40,411,092 




1,097,902 


.49 


2,250,000 




1960—13 wks. to Sept. 24 


6,218,374 




152,545 


.07 


2,250,000 




1959 — 13 wks. to Sept. 26 


7,448,113 




384,303 


.17 


2,250,000 



Notes: 1 After $455,000 tax credit. 2 After preferred dividends. 3 From SEC reports (Vol. 16:52 p24). 



Wometco Enterprises Inc., the corporation based in 
Miami, Fla., which recently acquired KVOS-TV Bellingham, 
Wash, for $3 million (Vol. 16:48 p6), has registered an 
offering of 5 series of outstanding stock with SEC (File 
2-17437). To be sold by Lee Higginson Corp. and A. C. 
Allyn & Co., the offering includes 18,591 shares of class A 
common; 19,155 shares each of class B, series B, C & D 
common; 23,944 shares of class B, series E common (15,000 
to be reserved for sale to employes). Underwriting terms 
provide that the company will receive no proceeds unless 
the average price received by selling stockholders (less 
7%) exceeds $10, when 75% of the excess will go to 
Wometco. The shares were issued in connection with an 
agreement with the 2 underwriting firms when Wometco 
bought Marine Exhibition Corp., operator of the Miami 
Seaquarium. Other Wometco interests: WTVJ Miami, 
WFGA-TV Jacksonville, WLOS-TV & WLOS Asheville, 
23 theaters, vending machines, the Pepsi-Cola franchise in 
the Bahamas. 

Hazeltine’s 1960 earnings are expected to approximate 
1959’s per-share profit of $1.80. Vice Chmn. W. M. McFar- 
land believes 1961 “ought not to be very much different 
from 1960,” but 1962 should see “the start of an increase.” 
Hazeltine’s order backlog, he said, “is satisfactory and will 
increase in time to come.” 

Reports & comments available: Amphenol-Borg Elec- 
tronics and AB-PT, reports, A. C. Allyn & Co., 44 Wall St., 
N.Y. 5 • Sonar Radio, report, George, O’Neill & Co., 30 
Broad St., N.Y. 4 • Walt Disney Productions, report, 
Sutro & Co., Van Nuys Bldg., Los Angeles 14 • Electronic 
& Missile Facilities, discussion, Hardy & Co., 30 Broad St., 
N.Y. 4 • Textron, review, W. E. Hutton & Co., 14 Wall 
St., N.Y. 5 • Hallicrafters, analysis, Paine, Webber, Jack- 
son & Curtis, 25 Broad St., N.Y. 4 • Litton Industries, 
review, William H. Tegtmeyer & Co., 39 S. LaSalle St., 
Chicago 3 • Hathaway Instruments, report, Adams & 
Peck, 120 Broadway, N.Y. 5 • Pathe Equipment, pros- 
pectus, Amos Treat & Co., 79 Wall St., N.Y. 5 • Bell 
Electronic, prospectus, Schwabacher & Co., 14 Wall St., 
N.Y. 5 • Del Electronics, report, Bruno-Lenchner, Bigelow 
Square, Pittsburgh 19. 



Common Stock Dividends 

Stk. of 

Corporation Period Amt. Payable Record 

Storer Bcstg Q $0.45 Mar. 10 Feb. 24 

Storer Bcstg. “B” Q .12% Mar. 10 Feb. 24 



Westinghouse 1961 sales should show an increase for 
the 4th consecutive year, Pres. Mark W. Cresap predicted 
recently, but “intense cost-price pressure on profits” will 
continue. He said 1960 sales will slightly exceed last year’s 
$1.91 billion, but 1961 sales won’t match 1957’s record 
$2.01 billion. The adverse effect of the decline in prices, and 
increases in costs “will extend into 1961, although im- 
provement is anticipated in the 2nd half.” Consumer pur- 
chases of electrical products & home appliances “will equal 
or slightly exceed the industry’s 1960 levels,” Cresap said. 
“As the home-building market improves during the coming 
year, there should be an upturn in appliance sales during 
the 2nd half of 1961,” he added. 



OVER-THE-COUNTER 
COMMON STOCK QUOTATIONS 

Thursday, January 5, 1961 
Electronics TV-Radios- Appliances Amusements 



The following quotations, obtained in part from the National Asso- 
ciation of Securities Dealers Inc., do not represent actual transactions. 
They are intended as a guide to the approximate range within which 
these securities could have been bought or sold at time of compilation. 



Stock 


Bid Asked 


Stock 


Bid Asked 


Acoustica Associates _ 


18% 


19% 


Magna Theater 


2% 


2% 


Aerovox 


8% 


9% 


Magnetics Inc. 


7% 


8% 


Allied Radio 


22% 


24% 


Maxson (W.L.) 


11 14 


12% 


Astron Corp. 


1% 


2 


Meredith Pub. 


41% 


44% 


Baird Atomic 


2314 


25% 


Metropolitan Bcstg. 


19 


20% 


British Industries 


18 


19% 


Milgo Electronics 


19% 


21% 


CGS Labs _ - 


6% 


8% 


Narda Microwave 


3% 


4% 


Cetron _ _ _ 


5% 


614 


Nuclear of Chicago 


39% 


43 


Control Data Corp. 


64% 


6714 


Official Films 


2% 


2% 


Cook Elec. 


12 '4 


13% 


Pacific Automation 


4% 


5%, 


Craig Systems _ 


15 


1614 


Pacific Mercury 


5% 


6 


Dictaphone _ 


2914 


3114 


Philips Lamp 


155% 


161 


Digitronics 


2214 


24% 


Pyramid Electric 


2% 


2% 


Ea-sterr) Tnd 


14 


15 y 8 


Radiation Inc. 


24 


26 V* 


Eitel-McCullough 


18 


19% 


Howard W. Sams 


38 


40% 


Elco Corp. 


14 


15% 


Sanders Associates 


34 


36% 


Electro Instruments — 


24 


26% 


Silicon Transistor 


4% 


5% 


Electro Voice 


7% 


814 


Soroban Engineering . 


39 


41% 


Electronic Associates _ 


27% 


30% 


Soundscriber 


16 


17% 


Erie Resistor 


9 14 


10% 


Speer Carbon - 


18 


19% 


Executone 


20 


22% 


Sprague Electric 


53 


57 


Farrington Mfg. 


27y« 


29% 


Sterling TV . _ 


1% 


2 




38 


41% 


Taft Bcstg. 


12% 


13% 


General Devices 


1114 


12% 


Taylor Instrument 


38% 


41% 


G-L Electronics _ 


9 


1014 


Technology Inst. 


7% 


8% 


Granco Products 


2% 


3% 


Telechrome 


12% 


13% 


Gross Telecasting 


2014 


22% 


Telecomputing 


7 


7% 


Hallicrafters 


3314 


36% 


Time Inc. __ 


79 


84% 


Haydu 


1/16 


% 


Tracerlab _ — 


9 


10% 


Hewlett-Packard 


2814 


30% 


United Artists 


5% 


6 


High Voltage Eng. 


160 


170 


United Control 


15% 


17 


Infrared Industries 


17 


18% 


Universal Trans. 


% 


1-3/16 


Interstate Engineering 


2114 


23 


Vitro — 


10% 


11% 


Itek — _ 


4814 


52% 


Vocaline 


2% 


3-1/16 




7 


7% 


Wells-Gardner 


21 


22% 


Lab for Electronics — 


4514 


48% 


Wometco Ent. . _ 


12% 


13% 


Lei Inc. 


514 


6 % 









WEEKLY 



Television Digest 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



1961 TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. 

JAN 1 6 1961 



r - 3 



The authoritative service for executives in all branches of the television arts & industries 



SUMMARY-INDEX OF WEEK'S NEWS 



EXCLUSIVE IN THIS ISSUE • annua l survey of telefilm pilots to be offered 

in the program market for next season (pp. 3, 8 & 9). 



FCC 

MINOW AS FCC CHAIRMAN — knowns & unknowns of young 
Stevenson protege weighed — but speculation ends with: "Wait & 
see" (p. 1 & 5). 

PROGRAM-FORM REVISION IS NEAR. FCC is approaching agree- 
ment on station-reporting requiremnts — spots-per-hour, no com- 
posite week, etc. (p. 4). 

FCC SUGGESTS CATV LAW — but is losing desire to push it as 
CATVs & stations continue to resolve conflicts (p. 4). 

PAYOFF RULES ADOPTED BY FCC in line with Harris-Pastore 
Act requirements for agreements between applicants that elimi- 
nate competition for licenses (p. 6). 

Stations 

LANDIS DROPS SOME HINTS in WNTA-TV N.Y. interview. Presi- 
dential asst, for regulatory agencies speaks of exploration of 
govt.-produced programming, shift to uhf operation (p. 3). 
COLLINS SCORNS "IMAGE" MAKERS in his maiden speech as 
NAB pres. He says industry shouldn't strive "to create images 
that are not the real thing" (p. 3). 

Networks 

CBS & NBC ENJOYED MANY SUCCESSES, many gains during 
1960, according to year-end reports from the 2 networks. Both 
claim credit for "The Great Debate" (pp. 5 & 7). 

NEW CBS DAYTIME PLAN puts the 10 a.m.-noon shows on a 
mandatory "rotating participation" basis instead of being sold in 
15-min. segments (p. 6). 

OCTOBER NETWORK TV BILLINGS rose 7.2% to $63.3 million. 

Ten-months business gained 9.3% to $557.6 million from $510.3 
million in Jan.-Oct. 1959 (p. 8). 



Consumer Electronics 

I960 TV PRODUCTION— 5,716,268— was 3rd lowest since 1949. 
But 1960 was the 2nd biggest year in total radio (17,135,114 sets) 
& auto radio (6,438,658) output (p. 19). 

QUALITY STRESSED AT MART. Price increases seen as inevita- 
ble, despite lower prices on leaders. Slow business spurs talk of 
electronics bolt from Chicago Mart (p. 19). 

NEW SETS & FEATURES at markets: Westinghouse provides free 
decorating service for TV-stereo owners; Magnavox "TV light 
meter;" Philharmonic line revived (pp. 20 & 22). 

TV IMPORTS INCREASE: Delmonico bringing in 4,000 Japanese 
TVs a month. Majestic introducing 2 German sets. Delmonico has 
2 consoles, plans lower-priced portable (p. 23). 

Programming 

TV DEBATES ALONE DECIDE 6% (or more than 4 million) of all 
voters in the Presidential election, Roper survey determined. Fig- 
ures revealed in Frank Stanton's magazine article (p. 14). 
"UNTOUCHABLES" HASSLE finds protesting Dir. of U.S. Bureau 
of Prisons telling stations he'll go to FCC about it (p. 14). 

Congress 

GOVT. SUBSIDIES FOR TV in Presidential campaigns are urged 
by Sen. Mansfield, who proposes $l-million grants to parties (p. 16). 

Advertising 

FTC's KERN ASSAILS LANDIS, accusing President-elect Kennedy's 
agency advisor of trying to "sell out the public interest" in anti- 
trust recommendations (p. 18). 

Other Departments 

EDUCATIONAL TV (p. 15). PERSONALS (p. 18). FINANCE (p. 23). 



MINOW — THE KNOWNS & UNKNOWNS: You can speculate endlessly about probable im- 

pact of Newton Norman Minow , (pronounced ''minnow'') as next chairman of FCC — but after a week of 
investigation we come up with this marvelously perceptive conclusion: "We'll just have to wait & see." 

We can lay all pertinent factors before you for your consideration. 

He's intelligent — first in his 1950 Northwestern U. law class, receiving "outstanding graduate" Wig- 
more Award, editor-in-chief of school's law review. 

He's concerned about FCC's role — apparently believes it should be more active in regulating. 

He's liberal — an Adlai Stevenson protege during virtually all his career. 

He's young — 35 tomorrow (17), thus 2nd youngest chmn. in FCC history. (Charles Denny was acting 
chmn. at 33, chmn. at 34.) 

He's active, outgoing, civic-, political- & social-minded (see p. 5 for background). 



2 JANUARY 16, 1961 

He's inexperienced in FCC matters — has never practiced before Commission, has had little to do 
with other federal regulatory agencies. 

He's interested in TV's final product, programs — watches a lot, likes it, and criticizes it. 

• • • • 

Minow is one of Stevenson's law partners , almost all of whom have been tapped for high administra- 
tion jobs. He will replace Republican Comr. Charles King, whose recess appointment expires June 30. Minow 
will take over as soon as he's confirmed by Senate & sworn in, and he'll have to be reappointed & recon- 
firmed by June 30 to continue after that date. If the Senate Commerce Committee chooses, it can consider 
him now for both the short & long terms and the Senate can assure him now of 7Vfe years at FCC. However, 
Committee Chmn. Magnuson (D-Wash.) hasn't said anything about that — and it's known he's miffed at the 
appointment because he was pushing his special counsel, Seattle attorney Kenneth Cox, for the job. 

Magnuson could make things most disagreeable for Minow during the confirmation hearing (which 
presumably will come early in February) — but it's doubtful that Magnuson would cross Kennedy on a mat- 
ter such as this. The talk revolves around the Landis Report, which urges a strong White House hand in 
FCC affairs- — quite opposed to the traditional Congressional position that FCC is "an arm of Congress." Will 
Minow be pinned down to declare his allegiance? Everyone — Minow, Commerce Committee, administra- 
tion — is in a bind on that one. 

Minow's most important duty, by far, will be to deal with Congress . A chairman can do almost any- 
thing or nothing at FCC and get by with it. His "moment of truth" comes before Congress. Minow steps into 
the job at a most critical time, when the Commission will offer important & complex legislative recommenda- 
tions. He'll have to call on every faculty he has. 

Minow comes to Washington Jan. 17, will meet this week with Magnuson and FCC Chmn. Ford, 
among others, take in Inaugural activities. He has contacted Ford who offered him full cooperation, includ- 
ing a complete report by the staff on all major Commission problems & their suggestions for resolving them. 

• • • • 

There are some clues to Minow's thinking. He worked with Stevenson on the latter's proposal that 
the networks give candidates free time during the campaigns (Vol. 16:11 pi 3). Stevenson later testified that 
it might be better if govt, paid for it. Minow was counsel, though not before FCC, for the Midwest Council on 
Airborne TV Instruction, and gen. counsel for Encyclopaedia Brittanica Films. He has done work for United 
Airlines, 111. Bell and Airline Pilots Assn. 

Two years ago, he participated in a Fund for the Republic panel on "Broadcasting & Govt. Regula- 
tion in a Free Society," with FCC Comr. Hyde, former FCC gen. counsel Benedict P. Cottone, Raymond F. 
Kohn of WFMZ Allentown, Pa., Herbert Alexander of Princeton, N.J., former FCC staff member Charles Clift, 
Princeton U. history prof. Eric F. Goldman, Fund representatives Frank K. Kelly & Robert W. Horton. 

His participation was mainly in form of questions — but his questions certainly followed a "strong 
FCC" direction. He did have the last word in the discussion: "The fundamental concept, it seems to me, is 
that if you are going to have a democratic society in an age of mass communication, when people are 
spending so much time watching TV, the airways ought to be available for as much discussion as possible. / 

Minow also observed: "The point, it seems to me , is that a licensee makes certain promises, and the 
FCC never checks to see whether he performs, whether he delivers, despite the fact that under the statute it 
is its obligation to do so. I don't want to talk about cures, but is that the general fact?" 

He was careful & affable in our interview with him, saying: "I'm not an expert on broadcasting and 
I am certainly the first to acknowledge that." As for the Landis Report, he said he had gone through it and 
I'm certain it has great insight into the problems of the agencies," but that he hadn't studied enough to com- 
ment on specific problems. He did no work on the report, wasn't consulted by Landis. 

There's lot of continued talk in Washington to effect that the administration would like to get another 
New Frontier man on FCC quickly, replacing one of the 3 incumbent Democrats — Bartley, Craven or Cross. 
Speculation is that one might be eased into another govt. job. All 3 tell us they know nothing of the idea, 
and it's our impression that none likes it very much. 



VOL. 17: No. 3 



3 



OUR EXCLUSIVE PILOT STUDY IN THIS ISSUE: Action & adventure or the combina- 

tion of both will be emphasized on TV next season. Comedy, which began a comeback in I960, will be a 
strong runner-up. Our annual check of Hollywood production companies (extended this year to N.Y. and 
including some British pilots) discloses that a minimum of 70 action-adventure pilots are being filmed for pres- 
entation in this selling season (see p. 8). 

Comedies have dropped from 70 pilots last year to 54 this season, but they remain a producer staple. 
The dip undoubtedly stems from the fact that few comedies have struck rating gold in this season's renais- 
sance ("The Andy Griffith Show" and "My 3 Sons" were the exceptions, not the rule). On the other hand, the 
popularity of the action series, "The Untouchables," has prompted the production of pilots which some 
executives frankly confide are "like 'The Untouchables.' " (See p. 14) 

Westerns — at least new ones — are in decline. This year's 9 compares with last year's 30. 

Other data gathered in our survey: There is considerable variety in the overall picture of approxi- 
mately 200 pilots — a figure that matches last year's. At least 24 dramatic series are in the offing; 4 
anthologies, sports, travelogues, documentaries, musicals, audience participation, even a comedy-Western. 
(For the complete tabulation of our survey, see p. 9.) 

LANDIS DROPS SOME HINTS: Kennedy administration may push for a stronger govt. TV 

hand, indicated James M. Landis in N.Y. Jan. 12. The man who is soon to become Presidential asst, for the 
regulatory agencies said, during a WNTA-TV interview by newsman Mike Wallace, that the general "tenor” 
of TV programming is within the province of govt, regulation. He cited "the lowest common denominator" as 
being a key target for programmers. "Now, if that's so," he added, "we ought to be able to lift it a little higher 
than that." 

Asked, if he advocated govt, regulation of content, Landis said he meant the "tenor of it." 

Possibility of govt.-owned network was also suggested by Landis during the interview. He thought 
there was "a lot to be said" for govt. TV operations such as Britain's BBC-TV and Canada's CBC-TV. Asked 
if he intended to push for govt, programming "to compete with commercial programming," Landis hedged 
somewhat, saying, "Not at this stage, certainly." 

He didn't rule out a govt, network, however . "It might be that we can have so many channels 
available that it might be desirable to have the govt, at least condescend to do something for the fine arts 
... on TV as well as elsewhere." Summing up his feelings on govt.-produced TV programs for U.S. con- 
sumption, Landis said, "I think it should be explored." 

Landis also tackled the always-hot uhf-vhf question . A shift to uhf, he said, "would open up a new 
market . . . give new opportunities." He agreed with Wallace that he was suggesting that the govt, create 
an opportunity "for men to go into the broadcasing business . . . with a view to introducing more competition 
into the field." Such a move, Landis declared, would "improve programming . . . give more employment . . . 
improve our entire facilities of communication." 

COLLINS SCORNS 'IMAGE' MAKERS: In his maiden speech as industry's spokesman, new 

NAB Pres. Leroy Collins lashed out last week at those who "strive with elaborate efforts & great expense to 
create images that are not the real thing." 

Broadcasters as well as politicians can be guilty of such "deception," ex-Fla. Gov. Collins told Fed- 
eral Communications Bar Assn, at its annual banquet in Washington Jan. 13. He deplored "unmitigated con- 
ceit" by which public-relations practitioners presume "that regardless of what a man's inner self may be, 
they can dress him out in a way that no one will know the real man under the costume." 

"If America is to do more than survive , the way is not to try to sell ourselves as something we are 
not, but to devote our chief energies toward making ourselves something better than what we are," Collins 
said. "And the same is true of broadcasting." 

Collins promised "to be an advocate, not a referee, for broadcasting." He said TV & radio have 
made a "tremendous amount of progress," that "over & over again we should tell our good story." But he 
added: "Yet, also like America, broadcasting has had — and still has — some features of which it cannot be 
proud. These things must be, as they have been, regarded by broadcasting not as defeats but as challenges 
to do better, 



4 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



NAB's new chief acknowledged that he's "new to broadcasting, " begged off in his FCBA speech 
from getting involved with "such topics as vhf, uhf, pay TV, CATV, FCC, FTC, ABC, CBS, MBS or NBC." 
Instead, he said, he wanted to sketch broad outlines of his "hopes & aspirations" in the NAB office: 

"Broadcasting moves goods and, thus, sparks American business . But it moves more than goods. It 
moves men's minds & hearts. Through broadcasting, men can learn to love or hate, to do good or evil, to be 
democratic or despotic, to be free men or slaves, to worship God or Baal. 

"Broadcasting helps reflect, mold and direct the very essence of the society in which it functions. 
It is, therefore, a living, creative, independent part of America & American democracy. America's goals 
must be broadcasting's goals. For if broadcasting is to endure in a free society, the best interests of broad- 
casting must coincide with the public interest." 

Collins also made it clear earlier in his first week at NAB hq that, in aiming for these goals, he 
plans to be no mere front man for the industry as a speechmaker. He told us in an interview that he intends 
to be in charge of "running the ship" with the help of "a sort of cabinet" of other hq officers who'll be called 
for conferences every Tues. "I believe strongly that the staff should give leadership to the board," he said. 

"I am not going to be happy in this job unless I do a creative job," Collins told us. "I don't think 
I'd be worth the money [$75,000 per year] unless I do. I don't undertake this as just an administrative job." 

PROGRAM-FORM REVISION NEAR: FCC is nearing end of its work on application forms 

to change its quiz of stations' programming performance & plans. It discussed the subject for 3rd time Jan. 
13, is expected to agree finally within a few weeks. 

Most of FCC's plans are same as we disclosed earlier (Vol. 16:46 p4). However, it's expected that 
forms will be somewhat less specific in certain areas — following a suggestion of Comr. Craven. It looks as 
if the Commission will drop its system of requiring stations to analyze their schedules during a specific 
"composite week." Instead, they would be asked whether they have broadcast or plan to carry — "daily," 
"weekly," or "occasionally" — programs in these categories: Religious, instructive, public affairs, agricultural, 
news, sports, entertainment, other. Each would be defined, and stations wouldn't have to show what per- 
centage of time is devoted to each. 

It also appears that Commission will ask for a report on past & future spots-per-hour practice — but 
not a breakdown of spots by length. Rather, FCC is thinking of requiring a station to indicate the maximum 
number of commercial minutes it has carried or will carry per hour. 

FCC SUGGESTS CATV LAW — BUT: Legislation for limited CATV regulation will be suggested 

to Congress by FCC, as indicated earlier (Vol. 16:51 p9), Chmn. Ford told an NCTA regional seminar in 
Washington last week. But we're informed privately that the Commission would be delighted to forget about 
legislation if stations & CATV can patch up relations and make regulation unnecessary. Whether Congress 
would feel the same way may be something else. 

One FCC spokesman put it this way: "I hear that there are only a couple of CATV-station conflicts 
left and that these may be cleared up. If so, I see no reason to regulate for the sake of regulating. I believe 
in the free enterprise system. That's what built this country." 

At any rate. Ford told the CATV group that law it has drafted has 2 major provisions: (1) Require 
CATVs to carry local-station signals. (2) Require, whenever necessary, that CATVs not duplicate local-station 
programs. All disputes, he said, would be handled on a case-by-case basis — with hearings when necessary. 

NCTA board later reaffirmed its position that legislation is unnecessary. 

Said new Pres. William Dalton : "Much progress has been made solving CATV problems at the local 
level, which is as it should be. We see no need for legislation." 

CATV operators also heard report on small-market TV operations by Hamilton Shea, of WSVA-TV 
Harrisonburg, Va. which co-exists well with a local CATV system. Gist of his talk: Best thing for CATV to do 
is to carry local-station signals, so that some credit for local programming (news, weather, etc.) will "rub off 
on them." He also alluded to the potential problem facing both small-town stations and CATVs — invasion by 
vhf translators, particularly those operated by big-town stations seeking to extend their coverage areas. 
WRVA-TV (Ch. 12) Richmond has applied for Ch. 5 translators for Harrisonburg, Staunton & Waynesboro. 
Several other similar applications are on file, and it's expected that operators such as Shea will oppose them. 



VOL. 17: No. 3 



1960 AT CBS & NBC: Year-end reviews issued by CBS & NBC last week were bullish . Both 

reported gains in sales, ad revenue, programming, public-affairs activities, news reporting, sportscasting, 
spot sales, overseas deals and non-broadcast ventures (see p. 7). 

NBC stressed "broad advertiser representation" in sales areas (daytime & nighttime buys), pointed 
proudly to hot 1960 rating scores rung up by its news coverage of the convention-debate-election cycle. Of 
the 2 networks, NBC easily led CBS in number of entertainment specials offered (almost 3 times as many), 
and was ahead in colorcasting and volume of sports shows. 

CBS leaned heavily on hard sales & audience facts in its annual wrap-up, plugged for its "balanced" 
nighttime lineup in 1960, daytime strength, the success of several top specials, and its own heavy schedule of 
news & public-affairs programming last year — particularly "CBS Reports," which began in 1959 as a monthly 
show, eventually became a weekly prime-time series by 1960's end. 

Both networks, in effect, claimed credit for TV debates between Kennedy & Nixon . Said CBS: They 
". . . climaxed a continuing effort by CBS Pres. Frank Stanton, joined by industry leaders 6t the nation's pub- 
lishers." Said the other network: "NBC, through its chairman, took the initiative in making possible 'The 
Great Debate' series." 

In any event, it had obviously been an important , stimulating, exciting — and undoubtedly profitable 
— year for the 2 networks. 



The FCC 

More about 

MINOW— THE MAN: Everyone who knows Newton N. 

Minow, FCC Chmn.-designate (page 1), starts out 
with the same sort of comment: "Nice guy. Very 
bright." Everything we can learn points to an ex- 
tremely well-balanced young man. 

He likes to watch TV, but it’s hard to understand how 
he finds the time. Last year, the Chicago Junior Chamber 
of Commerce, in naming him one of the city’s 10 outstand- 
ing young men, listed these among his activities : 

Junior board of the National Conference of Christians 
& Jews. Board of the Northwestern U. Alumni Assn. 
Committees of the Chicago Bar Assn. Writings on the 
Chicago court system. Board of the American Jewish 
Committee and of the Jewish Community Centers of Chi- 
cago. Lectures at colleges. League of Women Voters’ 
groups & schools. Led discussion groups sponsored by the 
Fund for Adult Education. Affiliated with many clubs, 
including the Economic Club, the City Club, the Legal Club, 
the Council on Foreign Relations. Secy.-gen. counsel of the 
National Business & Professional Men & Women for 
Kennedy- Johnson. Chmn. of Citizens for Kennedy in North 
Shore Suburbs. And still other projects. 

Minow was born in Milwaukee, on Jan. 17, 1926, 
attended public schools there, served as an Army sergeant 
in the China-Burma-India Theater during World War II. 
He then attended Northwestern, received B.S. from the 
school of speech in 1949, LL.B there in 1950. 

On graduation, he joined the Chicago firm of Friedlich, 
Spiess, Tierney, Brown & Platt. In 1951, he became a law 
clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Vinson. In 1952, he 
joined 111. Gov. Adlai Stevenson as administrative asst. 
When Stevenson’s term expired, he went back to his law 
firm, remaining 2 years until 1955, when he joined Steven- 
son’s new firm of Stevenson, Rif kind & Wirtz — where he’s 
been ever since. 

His wife is the former Josephine Baskin of Chicago 
and they have 3 daughters — 8, 6 and 2. He’s stocky, plays 
golf in mid-80’s, tells a good story, speaks rapidly, likes 
movies as well as TV. 



Administrative conference of 65 delegates to improve 
operations of federal regulatory agencies such as FCC has 
been blue-printed for President-elect Kennedy by U.S. 
Circuit Court Judge E. Barrett Prettyman. Named last 
August by President Eisenhower to head a White House 
Conference on Administrative Procedure (Vol. 16:36 p5 et 
seq.), Prettyman submitted to Kennedy through James M. 
Landis proposed bylaws for a continuing national assembly. 
Landis, the President-elect’s asst, on agencies, endorsed 
such a setup in his report to Kennedy on agency faults 
(Vol. 17:1 pi). Prettyman said he’d call an organizational 
meeting of the conference — possibly late in Feburary — if 
Kennedy follows Landis’s recommendation. As outlined by 
Prettyman, the 65-member conference would be made up of 
40 delegates from the govt. & 25 from bar groups, univer- 
sities and accounting & engineering professions. Confer- 
ence committees would hold closed meetings on agency 
problems, but the conference itself would meet in public 
sessions at least twice a year. It wouldn’t investigate 
agencies but would try to persuade them to adopt recom- 
mendations for more efficient procedures. 

Automatic logging of operational measurements in TV 
& radio stations should be permitted, NAB said in a rule- 
making petition to FCC, which now requires that such logs 
be kept manually. Engineering mgr. A. Prose Walker & 
his asst. George Bartlett argued in the petition that NAB- 
supervised experiments at stations in such cities as 
Winston-Salem, Washington, Philadelphia and Los Angeles 
demonstrated “superior accuracy” of electro-mechanical 
logging devices. Asking that licensees be authorized to 
maintain logs either manually or automatically, they said 
the apparatus (manufactured by RCA, Texas Instruments 
and Minneapolis-Honeywell) virtually eliminates improper 
maintenance of logs — most frequently cited category of 
FCC rule violations. The NAB petition maintained that 
remotely-controlled readings of output current, obstruction 
lighting, frequency deviation, etc., caused no degradation in 
stations’ operating standards. Walker & Bartlett also 
called for relaxation of FCC rules for AM frequency- 
deviation readings. They said that reports from more than 
1,700 stations showed that a 6-month average deviation 
rarely exceeded 3 cycles per second. 



6 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



PAYOFF RULES ADOPTED: Formal implementation of 
Harris-Pastore Act provisions against pay-off deals to 
eliminate competition for TV & radio licenses was 
voted Jan. 11 by FCC, which adopted a new set of rules 
(Vol. 17:2 p6) effective Feb. 20. 

At the same time, the Commission (Hyde, Craven and 
Cross dissenting) proposed further rule-making under Sec. 
307(b) of the Communications Act covering “fair, efficient 
and equitable distribution of radio service” in communities 
where a single applicant for a license withdraws by agree- 
ment. Feb. 20 was set as deadline for comments on this. 

In adopting the pay-off rules, FCC also issued an order 
extending the chief hearing examiner’s authority so that 
he may make “appropriate disposition” of applications 
involved in competitive cases in which withdrawals aren’t 
based on agreements between the parties. 

This is how FCC describes the new rules: 

“Applicants entering into an agreement which would 
result in removing a conflict between 2 or more pending 
applications for a broadcast facility must file with the 
Commission a joint request for approval of such agreement. 

“Each applicant party to the agreement shall also file 
an affidavit setting forth full factual details concerning the 
agreement & any consideration which has been paid or 
promised in connection therewith. 

“In those cases where a joint request for approval of 
an agreement has not been filed: 

“(1) Any applicant for broadcast facilities seeking 
to amend or dismiss a pending application must file an affi- 
davit as to whether or not he has received or been promised 
consideration where the effect of the amendment or dis- 
missal would be to remove a conflict with another applica- 
tion. 

“(2) Any applicant in a hearing concerning whose 
application a conflict would be removed by the requested 
amendment or dismissal of another application, or by 
dismissal of another application for failure to prosecute, 
must file an affidavit stating whether or not he has paid 
or promised to pay consideration for such amendment or 
dismissal.” 

In its proposed rules on amendments for withdrawals 
by lone applicants for facilities in a particular community, 
FCC would approve them “only after other persons have 
been afforded an opportunity to apply for a station on the 
same frequency, in the same community, and with sub- 
stantially the same engineering characteristics.” 

The withdrawing applicants also would be required to 
“publish appropriate notice” of their intentions in their 
communities, and FCC then would accept other applications 
for 30 days. 



Deadline for comments on FCC’s proposed rules 
against quick-buck trafficking in station licenses (Vol. 16:50 
pi) has been extended to Jan. 26 from Jan. 16, replies to 
Feb. 6. The Commission advanced the date at the request 
of NAB chief counsel Douglas A. Anello & others who said 
they needed more time. In his petition for a postponement, 
Anello said he knew of no licensee which favored traffick- 
ing, but that “questions have arisen with respect to the 
precise application of certain aspects” of the proposals. 

FCC’s non-policy-making internal procedures will be 
studied by management consultants Booz, Allen & Hamilton 
— part of the Budget Bureau’s continuing examination of 
govt, agencies within its jurisdiction. The job will take 
about 5 months, cost about $60,000. 



Networks 



New CBS Daytime Strategy: A form of “magazine con- 

cept” selling, effective Feb. 13, is being launched in the day- 
time CBS-TV schedule. Under the plan, shows scheduled 
between 10 a.m. and noon will no longer be sold in 15-min. 
segments but will be available only for 60-sec. participa- 
tions. Advertisers will not be able to hold “fixed” spots but 
will “checkerboard” through the shows on a rotating ar- 
rangement. 

The show lineup currently included in the new plan: 
December Bride (reruns), Video Village, I Love Lucy 
(reruns) and The Clear Horizon. Advertisers affected 
include: Vick Chemical, American Home Products, Borax 
Co., Lever Bros., Lipton, Best Foods, Colgate Palmolive. 

CBS didn’t go into detail on the reasons for the move, 
but some are evident. Sale of all the 60-sec. availabilities 
will gross more than the time sold in quarter-hour chunks, 
and CBS has long wanted to attract the small-budget & 
seasonal advertisers who now buy participations in NBC’s 
The Dave Garroway-T oday show and The Jack Paar Show 
(see NBC story, p. 7) and in ABC’s participation-sold day- 
time shows. 

CBS is also in a close competitive daytime race with 
NBC, with the latter claiming to be “in our best over-all 
daytime position since Dec. 1957.” In the 2nd of Nielsen’s 
Dec. NTI reports, NBC drew for the 10 a.m.-l p.m., 2-5 
p.m. period a score 4% higher than the average for CBS 
and 83% higher than the ABC average. The gains made 
by NBC have, in turn, produced a daytime revenue squeeze 
on CBS, which is currently eager to regain the spot as top 
daytime money-maker. 

Prices for the new CBS plan: There’ll be a “minimum 
buy” (still to be evolved). Each participation will cost 
$3,200 gross in the winter, $2,800 in summer. Of this price, 
$1,000 is applicable toward the program charge, the balance 
represents network time. The time charges are subject to 
the usual discounts. There will he no reduction in station 
payments under the plan. 



NETWORK SALES ACTIVITY 



ABC-TV 

Hawaiian Eye, Wed. 9-10 p.m., participations eff. April. 
P. Lorillard (Grey) 

Action cartoon series, Mon.-Fri. 5:30-6:30 p.m., participa- 
tions eff. April. 

General Foods (Foote, Cone & Belding) 

Daytime programming, Mon.-Fri. participations eff. Feb. 
Chemivay (Cohen, Dowd & Aleshire) 

CBS-TV 

Presidential Inaugural ceremonies, Fri. 11 a.m.-12 noon & 
1-2:30 p.m. 

Savings & Loan Foundation (McCann- 
Erickson). 

NBC-TV 

Laramie, Tue. 7:30-8:30 p.m., participations eff. April. 
Gold Seal (Campbell-Mithun) 

Tales of Wells Fargo, Mon. 8:30-9 p.m., part. eff. March. 
Com Products (Lennen & Newell) 

NIT Basketball Games, March 18 & 25, late aft., half-spon. 
Wynn Oil (EWR&R) 




VOL. 17: No. 3 



7 



More about 

NBC IN 1960: Other highlights (see p. 5) from the 
yeai'-end review of network activities issued late last 
week by NBC-TV (see also p. 5) : 

Programming: NBC’s nearly 150 specials included 
“Peter Pan,” “Macbeth,” “Astaire Time,” and the operas 
(in color). Project 20 and special projects had a flock of 
their own, including “The Coming of Christ” and “Victory 
at Sea.” Walt Disney signed to produce both regular & 
special shows. And the network “enlarged its activity in 
both the creation & production of wholly-owned program 
properties, and strengthened its creative participation in 
outside packages.” 

News & public affairs: “A year of unparalleled success 
for the NBC News organization.” High on the achievement 
list — more than 80 special reports during the political year. 
Sponsorship jumped upward, with Longines-Wittnauer, 
American Motors Corp., Norelco, Purex, Timex and Gen- 
eral Mills joining the public-affairs roster. 

Sales: “For the 13th consecutive year, national adver- 
tisers invested more money than ever before in NBC-TV.” 
The network also “led all TV networks in total number of 
advertisers (247) and had as clients 24 of the nation’s 25 
largest advertisers — also an industry high.” In daytime, 
sales “in the fall increased to a level more than 30% ahead 
of 1959.” NBC's 2 participation carriers, The Dave Garro- 
way-Today show and The Jack Paar Show, had “their most 
successful year,” grossing 17% over 1959. 

Sportscasting: NBC “led its competition in televised 
sports coverage with 405 hours during 1960.” Pro football 
games of the National Football League were added on a 
regular basis & climaxed by the NFL championship game. 
Several post-season & special Bowl games were covered. 
The World Series, both All-Star games, and major-league 
ball games on weekends were carried, as well as golf, 
tennis, racing, bowling, basketball and other sports events. 

Color: “Carried over 1,000 hours of color during the 
year . . . more than 50% over 1959, and the rate of growth 
is increasing steadily.” At year’s end, “carrying almost 
80% more color than in the comparable period a year ago.” 
Introduced “the concept of continuous blocks of color.” 

Affiliate relations: Affiliated with 211 stations having 
“ a combined coverage of more than 99% of the TV homes 
in America.” At year’s end, “179 affiliates were able to 
rebroadcast NBC’s daily color schedule, 23 were equipped 
with color cameras and 52 could originate color programs.” 

Other activities: TV & radio o&o’s set “new records 
for sales & profits,” scoring “a 6.1% increase in revenues 
over 1959.” Cal. National Productions, syndication off- 
shoot, marked its 10th year “with the most diversified 
programming schedule in its history.” Merchandising dept, 
expanded its licensing operations, resulting in “a 100% 
sales increase & significantly higher profits.” Theatrical 
div. operated the Hudson Theater in a “successful” season, 
and invested in 4 Broadway shows. NBC International 
Enterprises made investment-management deals in France, 
Japan, Argentina and Mexico. NBC Spot Sales’ TV-radio 
revenues were “at a new high.” 



Jurisdictional dispute between IATSE & IBEW over 
lighting a CBS-TV show should have been resolved by 
NLRB and not left to the network to decide, the Supreme 
Court ruled in a case stemming from a 1958 Let’s Take a 
Trip incident (Vol. 15:31 p9). NLRB had held that CBS 
had the right to assign the lighting work, but the Supreme 
Court upheld Court of Appeals ruling against NLRB. 



More about 

CBS IN 1960: Other highlights (see p. 5) from the 

year-end review of network activities issued late last 
week by CBS-TV : 

Programming: The network introduced 12 new night 
series (mostly situation comedies), and in daytime added 
2 new serials, The Clear Horizon and Full Circle, and a 
game show. Video Village. It telecast 59 entertainment 
specials, including the 2-part 2-hour Family Classics. 

News & public affairs: A heavy schedule of prime-time 
informational programming “accompanied by expanded 
sponsorship of such programming” was scheduled. Sponsors 
included Philip Morris, Firestone Tire & Rubber, Westing- 
house Electric, General Electric, Travelers Insurance, and 
American Machine & Foundry. 

Sales: “Gross time sales showed an increase over 1959 
and were 15.2% greater than the 2nd network’s during the 
first 9 months of the year (the most recent published 
figures).” Total of “153 different sponsors advertised their 
products. Of these, 25 were new to CBS-TV and 12 were 
new to network TV.” 

Sportscasting: Carried “more than 325 hours” of 
coverage, including the Winter & Summer Olympics, the 
Sunday Sports Spectacular series, post-season bowl games, 
70 pro football games, and Baseball Game of the Week. 

Affiliate relations: At year’s end, “206 stations in the 
U.S. were affiliated,” plus “48 stations in Canada, as well 
as stations in Puerto Rico, Guam, Bermuda, Virgin Islands 
and Mexico City.” The network’s Extended Market Plan, 
now in its 6th year, covers 39 stations, and carries 63 CBS- 
TV shows. 

Stations div.: In a separate report, div. Pres. Mexde S. 
Jones said that CBS-TV spot sales and CBS Films had “a 
7% sales increase” last year. The network-owned rep 
concern, within that total, showed a 12% sales increase, 
“substantially higher than the rate of increase for the 
industry as a whole.” International telecasting deals were 
made in Argentina, Peru, West Germany and Italy. (CBS 
Films had issued a year-end review of its own the previous 
week. See Vol. 17:2 pi 1 ) . 

* * * 

Judy Garland has dropped her $1.3-million, long-pend- 
ing (since Jan. 1957) lawsuit against CBS for “defamation 
of character” & “breach of contract”. In return, CBS has 
agreed to drop its counter-suit. The settlement was made 
“amicably,” according to CBS-TV Pi - es. James T. Aubrey 
Jr. He also noted that “negotiations are under way toward 
the possibility of her appearing on CBS-TV in the fall of 
1961.” Disposition of the suits lends an ironic twist to the 
prison sentence served by TV-columnist Marie Torre (Vol. 
15:1 p4 et seq.) for refusing to reveal a source in connec- 
tion with the legal dispute. 



ABC’s Miami meeting last week brought together the 
network’s top executives (AB-PT Pres. Leonard H. Gold- 
enson, ABC-TV Pres. Oliver Treyz, program vp Tom Moore, 
o&o vp Steve Riddleberger, et al.) and the heads of ABC’s 
o&o stations for some 1961-62 planning. Later in the week, 
they were joined by executives from key network affiliates 
and the TV affiliates board of governors. It’s understood 
that they covered (1) network program plans for next 
fall and their relationship to local programming on ABC 
stations, (2) the planned step-up in news & public-affairs 
programming under incoming vp James C. Hagerty, and 
(3) plans to improve ABC’s status in network radio. 



8 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



Network Television Billings 

October 1960 and January-October 1960 
For Sept, report, see Television Digest, Vol. 16:47 p8 



Oct. Billings Up 7.2%: Network TV’s Oct. 1960 gross- 

time billings rose to $63.8 million — 7.2% ahead of the $59.1 
million business that had been written in Oct. 1959. TvB’s 
latest tabulation also shows that October billings increased 
the year-to-date total to $557.6 million — 9.3% ahead of 
Jan.-Oct. 1959’s $510.3-million billings. 

NBC, for the first time in 1960, led the networks in 
monthly dollar volume, increasing business 9.6% over Oct. 

1959 to $25.1 million. Traditional dollar-leader CBS 
sagged 2.7% to $23 million in October business, but re- 
tained its leadership in the year’s cumulative billings — 
$227.3 million vs. runner-up NBC’s $202.4 million. ABC, 
as usual, led the way in percentage gains: 21.2% for Oct. 

1960 over Oct. 1959, 28.8% for Jan.-Oct. 1960 over 1959’s 
first 10 months. 

The 10-month nighttime billings of the 3 networks 
increased 13% to $388.4 million from $343.6 million in Jan. 
Oct. 1959. Daytime billings gained 1.5% to $169.3 million 
from $166.7 million. In Oct. vs. Oct. 1959, nighttime bill- 
ings were up 3.8% to $41.6 million from $40.1 million. 
Daytime jumped 14.4% to $21.6 million from $18.9 million. 

NETWORK TELEVISION 

Oct. Oct. % Jan.-Oct. Jan.-Oct. % 

1960 1959 change 1960 1959 change 

ABC $15,200,940 $12,537,020 +21.2 $127,922,350 $ 99,281,464 +28.8 

CBS 22,973,089 23,610,441 — 2.7 227,319,114 218,961,251 + 3.8 

NBC 25,090,051 22,883,291 + 9.6 202,377,062 192,071,765 + 5.4 

Total $63,264,080 $59,030,752 + 7.2 $557,618,526 $510,314,480 + 9.3 

1960 NETWORK TELEVISION TOTALS BY MONTHS 



ABC CBS NBC TOTAL 

January $13,260,010 $23,477,358 $20,980,897 $57,718,265 

February 12.677,110 22,977,171 19,923,712 55,677,993 

March 13,487,460 24,043,799 21,072,164 58,603,423 

April 12,701,240 22,580,032 20,642,038 55,923,310 

May 12,876,050 23,209,917 19,414,264 56,500,231 

June 11,948,700 22,062,832 18,959,323 52,970,855 

July 12,529,660 23,442,997 19,805,457 55,778,114 

August 11,366,100 21,448,482 18,052,503 50,867,085 

September 11,875,080 21,103,437 18,436,653 51,415,170 

October 15,200,940 22,973,089 25,090,051 63,264,080 



Note: Figures revised as of Jan. 5, 1961. These figures do not 

represent actual revenues inasmuch as the networks do not divulge their 
actual net dollar incomes. The figures are compiled by Broadcast 
Advertisers Reports (BAR) and Leading National Advertisers (LNA) 
for TV Bureau of Advertising (TvB) on the basis of one-time rates or 
before frequency or cash discounts. 



James C. Hagerty’s first N.Y. press conference in his 
new capacity (the Eisenhower aide joins ABC as news & 
public-affairs vp Jan. 23) was attended Jan. 9 by some 50 
newsmen. They found Hagerty in fine form, but unproduc- 
tive of much hard news. On a long-range basis, Hagerty 
said he hoped to make ABC a rival to other networks “by 
1964,” and that he planned to hire “several darn good peo- 
ple.” Of immediate plans, Hagerty couldn’t (or wouldn’t) 
speak. He indicated that as ABC news chief he would not 
be averse to using public-affairs shows produced outside 
the network, and planned eventually to draw on the “great 
potential” of local newsmen working for newspapers which 
own ABC-affiliated stations. In reply to a question con- 
cerning his possible appearance as a newsman or commen- 
tator before TV cameras, Hagerty said he had “no such 
plans,” grinned broadly when a reporter quickly queried, 
“Not even as a guest on What’s My Line?” — the show mc’d 
by John Daly, whom Hagerty is replacing. 



Film & Tape 

More about 

NEXT SEASON’S FILM SHOWS: Hollywood’s annual pilot 
production is at its seasonal peak, with approximately 
200 TV film pilots being prepared for next season (see 
pp. 3 & 9) . The gamble (and it’s just that) in producing 
them is a minimum of $10 million this year — a record. 
Reason for the higher total expenditure : The unprece- 
dented number of 60-min. pilots — 51. 

Last year, only 20 pilots of the nearly 200 were 
sold, and the figure probably won’t be much higher than 
that this season. But production companies know of no 
better way to offer potential sponsors a series sampling. 

The action-adventure category which will dominate 
next season’s picture breaks down into 3 types of shows — 
action, adventure and the combination of both. Sometimes 
the difference is hairline-thin. (One producer, describing 
his pilot, told us “I don’t really know if it’s what you call 
action or adventure — so call it action-adventure.”) An 
action show example is The Untouchables, in which the 
general approach & stress are on action. Adventures in 
Paradise typifies the adventure genre; adventure is the 
theme, action is incidental. Action-adventure, combining 
the 2, is illustrated in the minds of some by 77 Sunset Strip. 

Networks or their subsidiaries are heavily involved in 
the pilots, either through financing or production (Vol. 
16:52 p7). ABC-TV has interests in 17 pilots, including 
the projects of ABC Films and the AP-PT subsidiary, Sel- 
mur Productions. CBS-TV is in 16 ventures, including 
CBS Films pilots. And NBC-TV and its subsidiary, Cal. 
National Productions, also have 16. 

While the bulk of pilots is listed in our report this 
week, more may appear after completion of negotiations. 



Court decision freeing James Garner from his Warner 
Bros, contract will be appealed by both sides — by WB 
because it lost the case, and by the Maverick star because 
he seeks $46,000 damages instead of the $1,750 awarded 
him by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Arnold Praeger 
(Vol. 16:49 p8 et seq.). Garner’s initial acting assignment 
since winning his breach-of -contract suit against Warner 
Bros, will be as a guest on CBS-TV’s Angel. The segment’s 
being filmed this week. 

National campaign to curtail “runaway” (filmed 
abroad) production by U.S. producers has been renewed & 
intensified by the Hollywood AFL Film Council, composed 
of unions & guilds representing 24,000 movie workers. The 
Council said last week that runaway production takes from 
this country dollars that should be spent here, and this 
contributes to the gold crisis facing our govt. It urged all 
American union members to patronize only those movies 
made in this country — to “buy American.” The Council 
also accused at least one major U.S. advertiser of having 
contracted for filming of TV commercials outside this 
country. It would not identify the company, but said it 
would recommend action upon completion of a survey by 
its foreign film committee. 

Contract negotiations by TV-film & movie production 
companies with IATSE are under way in Hollywood. The 
union’s principal demands are for a 25% wage hike and 
increased pension and health & welfare benefits. The 
present contract expires Jan. 30. IATSE locals include such 
workers as stagehands, publicists, carpenters, electricians. 



VOL. 17: No. 3 



9 



Telefilm Candidates for Next Season's Programs 

All are 30-min. shows unless otherwise indicated. Italicized titles are ready for showing ; all others are in preparation. 


Company 
ABC Films 


Series Title 

Beverly Hills Is My 
Beat 


Category 

Action 


Producer 

Vernon Clark 


Stars 
Not cast 


Allied Artists 

(with Lindsley Parsons, 


Patrol Boat 999 
(60 min.) 


Action-Adventure 


Lindsley Parsons 


Not cast 


Inc.) 


Ardley Productions 


The Colonel’s Lady 


Comedy 


Stanley Roberts 


Eve Arden 


(Eve Arden, Stanley 
Roberts) 


Arrowhead Productions 
(Richard L. Bare) 


The Joan Davis 
Show 


Comedy 


Richard L. Bare 


Joan Davis 


Jamaica Reef 
(60 min.) 


Action-Adventure 


Richard L. Bare 


Not cast 


ATV 


Mr. Riviera 


Action-Adventure 


Dennis O’Dell 


Charles Drake 


Berwell Productions 


Jimmy and Me 


Comedy 


Arthur Lake 


Brad Berwick 


(Arthur Lake, Irving 


The Rolling Stones 


Comedy 


Irving Cummings 


Not cast 


Cummings Jr., Ray 
Berwick) 


Brogill Productions 

(E. J. Rosenberg, Frank 


Miss Brewster’s 
Millions 


Comedy 


E. J. Rosenberg 


Helen Traubel 


Gill Jr., George C. 


Brown) 










California Nat. Prod. 


Police Surgeon 


Drama 


Henry Kessler 


Not cast 




Cottage 54 


Action- Adventure 


Sam Gallu 


Not cast 


(with Alexander Film Co.) 


No. 7 Cannery Row 
The Wellington Bones 
Show 


Action-Adventure 

Cartoon 


Sam Gallu 
Bob Woodburn, 
Herb Johnson 


Not cast 


Cameron Enterprises 


Untitled 


Adventure 




Rod Cameron 


(Rod Cameron) 


CBS-TV 


Beachfront 
(60 min.) 


Action- Adventure 


Danny Arnold 


Not cast 




Hurricane Island 
(60 min.) 

The Dragon and St. 
George (60 min.) 


Action-Fantasy 

Action-Adventure 


Jack Harris 


Not cast 
Not cast 




High Time 


Comedy 


Cecil Barker 


Not cast 


CBS Films 


Russell 


Western 


Gordon Kay 


Fess Parker 


Call Me First 


Adventure 


Herb Meadow 


Reed Maxwell 




The Hawk 


Western 


Aubrey Stone, 
Howard Koch 


Richard Coogan 


(with Kenwood 


Turnpike 


Action-Adventure 


Frank La Tourette 


Frank Gifford 


Productions) 




Baron Gus 

Mr. Dodd 
Untitled 


Comedy 

Comedy 

Action-Adventure 


John Hess 


Ricardo Montalban, 
Pippa Scott 
Not cast 
Not cast 


Jack Chertok Television 


Mother Climbs a Tree 
(with Revue Studios) 


Comedy 


Jack Chertok 


Jan Clayton 




Untitled (60 min.) 
(with Revue) 


Action 


Jack Chertok 


Not cast 




Untitled (60 min.) 


Drama 


Jack Chertok 


Not cast 




Untitled (60 min.) 


Drama 


Jack Chertok 


Not cast 




Untitled 


Action-Adventure 


Jack Chertok 


Not cast 


Dick Chevillat, 


Marty and Me 


Comedy 


Dick Chevillat, 


Not cast 


Ray Singer 




Ray Singer 




Cooga Mooga Productions 
(Pat Boone) 


Barnum the Great 
(for ABC-TV) 


Comedy-Drama 


Mort Abrahams 


Not cast 


Baker’s Half Dozen 


Adventure 


Mort Abrahams 


Not cast 


Hal B. Cook Associates 


The Bonnie Prudden 
Show 


Women’s diet-beauty 
show 


Hal Cook, 
Dorothea Petrie 


Bonnie Prudden 


Jackie Cooper 


Charley Angelo 


Comedy-Drama 


Jackie Cooper 


James Komack, Larry 


Enterprises Inc. 






Storch 


Bing Crosby Productions 


Ben Casey (60 min.) 
(tent, title) 


Drama 


James Moser 


Not cast 




My Favorite Love Story 
(60 min.) 


Anthology 


Richard Collins 


Not cast 


Jaime del Valle 


Bush Pilot 


Action 


Jaime del Valle 


Not cast 


Untitled 


Action 


Jaime del Valle 


Not cast 



10 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



Company 

Desilu Productions 
(Lucille Ball, 

Desi Arnaz) 

(with McCann-Erickson 
Productions) 


Series Title 

My Wife’s Brother 

Mickey and the 
Contessa 

Homicide (60 min.) 
Untitled 

You Can’t Win ’Em All 

Counter-Intelligence 
Corps (60 min.) 

The Janis Paige Show 
The Man from Tele- 
graph Hill (60 min.) 


Category 

Comedy 

Comedy 

Action 

Western 

Comedy 

Action 

Comedy 

Drama 


Producer 

Cy Howard 

Cy Howard 

Mort Briskin 
Mort Briskin 
Bob Weiskopf, 
Bob Schiller 
Joseph Shaftel 


Stars 

Rowan & Martin, 
Carole Cook 
Eva Gabor, 

Mickey Shaughnessy 
Not cast 
Not cast 
Not cast 

Not cast 

Janis Paige 
Not cast 


Dazo Productions 


M.R. (60 min.) 


Action-Adventure 


Frank Cleaver 


Reed Hadlev 


(Frank Cleaver, John 
Florea) 


El Camino Productions 


Untitled 


Comedy 


Parke Levy 


Not cast 


(Parke Levy) 


Don Fedderson Prod. 


Tramp Ship 
Oh Johnny 

(for ABC-TV) 
Satan’s Waitin’ 
Hawaiian Hoike 
Observation 


Action 

Comedy 


Don Fedderson 


Neville Brand 
Johnny Carson 




Anthology 
Musical 
Audience Part. 


Joel Malone 


Ray Walston 
Not cast 
Johnny Hamer 


Film City Enterprises 


The Big Fever 
(60 min.) 


Action- Adventure 


Herb Meadow 


Not cast 


Filmaster Productions 


Our Town 


Drama 


Nat Perrin 


Not cast 


(Robert Stabler) 


Mr. In Between 


Comedy 


Nat Perrin 


Not cast 


The Number One 
(60 min.) 


Drama 


Nat Peirin 


Not cast 




Untitled 


Sports 


Nat Perrin 


Not cast 




Nightside 

(5-min.) 


Documentary 


Nat Perrin 


Donna Reed 




Swiss Family Robinson 


Drama 


Fritz Goodwin 


Not cast 


Filmways TV 
(A1 Simon) 


War Birds 

(for Cal. National) 


Action 


Sam Neuman 


Not cast 


Untitled 


Comedy 


A1 Simon 


Not Cast 


John Florea, Norman 
Alden 


The Eye and I 


Comedy-Mystery 


John Florea, 
Norman Alden 


Norman Alden 


Four Star Television 
(Dick Powell, David 


The Freshman 
(Sold to General Foods) 


Comedy 




Gertrude Berg, 
Cedric Hardwicke 


Niven, Charles Boyer, 
Tom McDermott) 


McKeever and the 
Colonel 


Comedy 


Tom McDermott 


Dennis Joel, 
Allyn Joslyn, 
John Gabriel, 
Virginia Gibson 




Our Man in Rome 


Adventure 


Sy Gomberg 


Rossano Brazzi 




The Sea Rover 
Untitled 

The Thurber Show 
Ensign O’Toole 


Adventure 

Comedy 

Comedy 

Comedy 


Art & Jo Napoleon 


Not cast 
Jimmy Durante, 
Eddie Hodges 
Orson Bean 
Dean Jones 




Untitled 
(60 min.) 

The Esther Williams 
Show 

The Shrimp 

The Jane Powell Show 


Western 

Comedy-Adventure 

Cartoon 

Comedy 


Vincent Fennelly 
Herb Klynn 


Not cast 
Esther Williams 

Jane Powell 




The Atoner 
Untitled 
(60 min.) 


Action-Adventure 

Drama 


Aaron Spelling 
Morton Fine, 
David Friedkin 


Not cast 


— - - - — 


the Corrupters 
(60 min.) 


Action-Adventure 


Leonard Ackerman, 
John Burrows 


Stephan McNally, 
Robert Harland 


(with Blake Edwards, _ 
Tom Waldman) 


The Boston Terrier 
(60 min.) 


Private Eye 


Tom Waldman 


Robert Vaughn 


(with Rory Calhoun, 


Untitled 


Action-Adventure 




Rory Calhoun 


Vic Orsatti) 
(Joint venture, with 


Untitled 


Action 


Sam Peckinpah 


Robert Culp 


Latigo Productions, 


Robert Culp & 
Four Star) 


. ... ... ... 










Simon Battle 


Western 


Gardner, Levy, Laven 


Philip Carey 


Levy, Arnold Laven 


The Rambling Man 


Comedy-W estern 


Gardner, Levy, Laven 


Gene Nelson 


Attorney General 


Drama 


Gardner, Levy, Laven 


Not cast 




Lariat Jones 


Western 


Gardner, Levy, Laven 


Dick Anderson 


Girard-Lewis Prod. 
(Bernard Girard, 


Room 63 
(60 min.) 


Adventure 


Bernard Girard 


Not cast 



Robert Lewis) 



VOL. 17: No. 3 



11 



Company 


Series Title 


Category 


Producer 


Stars 


Gomalco Productions 
(George Gobel, 
David O’Malley) 


Untitled 

Untitled 


Comedy-Anthology 

Comedy 


Ed Simmons 
Everett Freeman 


Not cast 
George Gobel 


Goodson-Todman Prod. 
(Mark Goodson, Bill 
Todman) 


Las Vegas Beat 
(60 min.) 

(for NBC-TV) 
Medical Detective 
Tiggero 


Action 

Drama 

Action- Adventure 


Andrew Fenady 

Howard Erskine 
Harry Julian Fink 


Peter Graves, Bill 
Bryant 

Not cast 
Not cast 


John Guedel Productions 


Take My Advice 


Panel show 


John Guedel 


George Fenneman, 
Hedy Lamarr, Carl 
Reiner, Bob Sweeney, 
Dr. Loriene Johnston 


Les Hafner Productions 


Pentagon 


Action-Adventure 


Les Hafner 


Not cast 


Hampshire Productions 
(Harry Tatelman) 


Come a Runnin’ 


Drama 


Harry Tatelman 


Not cast 


Harvey Productions 


Mutt & Jeff 
(color) 

Hot Stuff 
(color) 


Animated Cartoon 
Animated Cartoon 






Russell Hayden Productions 


Caribe Inn 
(60 min.) 


Action- Adventure 


Russell Hayden 


Jeffrey Stone, Don 
Dorrell, Tommy Cook 


Heritage Productions 
(Paul Benton, Buddy 
Bregman) 


The Lady in Red 
Ladies in Retirement 
(tent, title) 


Adventure 

Comedy 


Shirley Mellner 
Buddy Bregman 


Suzanne Lloyd 
Estelle Winwood, 
Gladys Cooper 


Nat Holt Productions 


Untitled 


Western 


Nat Holt 


Not cast 


ITC 


Sir Frances Drake 


Action-Adventure 




Not cast 


Jerry Lewis Enterprises 


Permanent WAVES 


Comedy 


Ernest Glucksman 


Hope Holiday, Bev- 
erly Wills, Dee Arlen, 
Kathleen Freeman, 
Bob Clayton 


Mark VII Ltd. 
(Jack Webb) 


The Barbara Nichols 
Show 


Comedy 


Jack Webb 


Barbara Nichols 


MGM-TV 

(Robert Weitmann) 


Cain’s 100 
(60 min.) 

(for NBC-TV) 
Woman in the Case 
(60 min.) 

(for NBC-TV) 
Darrow for the Defense 
Father of the Bride 
Harry’s Girls 
Dr. Kildare 


Action 

Anthology 

Drama 

Comedy 

Musical-Comedy 

Drama 


Paul Monash 

Paul Monash 

Norman Felton 
Robert Maxwell 
Ralph Levy 


Not cast 

Not cast 

Not cast' 
Leon Ames 
Larry Blyden 
Not cast 


NBC-TV 


The Big Tent 
(60 min.) 

Panama 

Three Men and a Girl 
(60 min.) 


Drama 

Adventure 

Comedy 


Howard Erskine 


Not cast 

Not cast 
Not cast 


Official Films 


Profiles 

(5-min.) 

Do You Remember? 

( 1-min.) 

Animal Land 
(5-min.) 

Biography 

Around the World with 
Delaplane 


Documentary 

Documentary 

Documentary 

Documentary 

Travelogue 


Sherman Grimsberg 

Sherman Grimsberg 

Sherman Grimsberg 

David Wolper 
James Delaplane 


Mike Wallace 






Omar Productions 
(Omar Garrison, 
Gordon Heaver, S. 
Earl Wright) 


Sunday Theater 
(60 min.) 


Drama 


Gordon Heaver 


Not cast 


O-R Productions 

(Jess Oppenheimer, Aldo 
Ray) 


Untitled 

(for CBS Films) 


Action-Adventure 


Robert Bassler 


Aldo Ray 


Frank Pitman & Andy 
White 


Untitled 

Untitled 


Western 

Comedy 


Frank Pitman, Andy 
White 

Frank Pittman, Andy 
White 


Not cast 
Not cast 


QM Productions 
(Quinn Martin) 


The New Breed 
(60 min.) 

(for ABC-TV) 
The Impatient Ones 
(for ABC-TV) 


Action 

Action 


Quinn Martin 
Quinn Martin 


Leslie Nielsen 
Not cast 



12 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



Company 

Rainbow Productions 


Series Title 
Mr. Doc 

(for CBS Films) 


Category 

Drama 


Producer 

Ralph Nelson 


Stars 

Dean Jagger 


Revue Studios 


The Green Horn 


Comedy 


Howard Christie 


Mickey Rooney 




17 Battery Place 
Tom Sawyer 


Action 

Drama 


Richard Irving 


Ron Randell 
Maureen O’Sullivan, 
Chuck Herbert 




The Boh Cummings 
Shoiv 

(Sold to R. J. Reynolds 
for CBS-TV) 


Comedy 


Bill Frye 


Bob Cummings 




My Darling Judge 


Comedy 


Sidney Lanfield 


Fred Clark, 
Audrey Totter 




The Rangers 


Action-Adventure 


A1 Ruddy 


Jock Mahoney 




The Denver & the Rio 
Grande 
(60 min.) 

Mr. Huggermugger 


Action-Adventure 

Cartoon 


Nat Holt 
David Fleischer 


Lang Jeffries 
(with Nat Holt) 


Hubbell Robinson 
Productions 


The Lawyer 
(60 min.) 


Drama 


Hubbell Robinson 


Lin McCarthy 




Stage 61 
(60 min.) 

(for ABC-TV) 


Anthology 


Hubbell Robinson 


Not cast 




87th Precinct 
(60 min.) 

(for NBC-TV) 


Action 


Hubbell Robinson 


Not cast 




The Family 
(60 min.) 


Drama 


Hubbell Robinson 


Not cast 


Roncom Productions 


Now Is Tomorrow 


Anthology 


Alvin Cooperman 


Charles Bickford 


(Perry Como, Alvin 
Cooperman) 


Two for the Road 


Comedy 


Alvin Cooperman 


Harvey Lembeck, 
Johnny O’Neill 


Her Honor, O’Connor 


Comedy-Drama 


Alvin Cooperman 


Not cast 




Rio (60 min.) 


Action-Comedy 


Alvin Cooperman 


Not cast 


Ross-Danzig TV Inc. 
(Bart Ross, Frank 
Danzig) 


Regulars at Large 


Comedy 


A1 Burton 


Louis Nye, Bill Dana, 
Don Knotts, Joey For- 
man 


Screen Gems 


The Hathaways 
(for ABC-TV) 


Comedy 


Robert Sparks 


Peggy Cass, Jack 
Weston, the Marquis 
Chimps 




Shannon 


Action 


Robert Sparks 


George Nader 




The Man in the Middle 


Action 


Robert Sparks 


Robert Sterling 




The Insiders 
(60 min.) 


Action 


William Sackheim 


David Janssen 




Archie 


Comedy 


Harry Ackerman 


Not cast 




Hazel 


Comedy 


James Fonda 


Not cast 




Baron of Boston 
(60 min.) 


Action-Adventure 


Harry Ackerman 


Not cast 




Safari (60 min.) 


Action-Adventure 


William Sackheim 


Not cast 




Empire 


Action-Adventure 


William Sackheim 


Not cast 




Bringing Up Mother 


Comedy 


Harry Ackerman 


Not cast 




Untitled 
(60 min.) 


Action-Adventure 


Harry Ackerman 


Not cast 




Riviera 

(for ABC-TV) 


Action-Adventure 


Russell Rouse, 
Clarence Green 


Mike Connors, 
Quinn Redeker 




The Daring Deeds of 
Donnie Drew 


Adventure 


Clarence Green, 
Russell Rouse 


Not cast 


(with Freddie Fields 
Associates) 


Grand Deception 
(60 min.) 


Adventure-Suspense 




Not cast 


Gidget 


Comedy 


Harry Ackerman 


Not cast 


.. 


Occupation: Female 


Comedy 


Harry Ackerman 


Polly Bergen 


Selby Cottage 


Daddy-0 


Comedy 


Rod Amateau 


Don DeFore, 


(Rod Amateau, Max 
Shulman) 


(for CBS Films) 






Lee Philips, 
Jean Byron, 



Trudy Ziskind, 
Kathe Green 



Selmur Productions 
(SelTg iSellgman; ' 
Leon Mirell, Peter 
Robinson) 


Untitled 

(for ABC-TV) 
Direct Line 
(for ABC-TV) 


Drama 

Documentary 


Peter Robinson 


Not cast 




Starward Productions 


Three White Hats . 


Action-Adventure 


Wilbur Stark, 


Not cast- 


(Wilbur Stark, 


(for Cal. National) 




A1 C. Ward 




A1 C. Ward). 










Tandem Productions 


Three to Make Ready 


Comedy 


Bud Yorkin, 


Not cast 


f Bud Yorkin, 
Norman Lear) 


(60 min.) 

(for Paramount) 
Meet Me at Danny’s 




Norman Lear 




Comedy 


Bud Yorkin, 
Norman Lear 


Michael J. Pollard 



Televenture Inc. Televenture Reports Informational Graham Young:, 

Art Foley 



VOL. 17: No. 3 



13 



Company 

Television Artists 
Producers Corp. 
(Bruce Eels) 


Series Title 
T Men 


Category 

Action 


Producer 


Stars 

Not Cast 


Telman Inc. 

(Joseph Shaftel) 


Dr. Kate (60 min.) 
(for ABC-TV) 


Drama 


Joseph Shaftel 


Jane Wyman, Rhys 
Williams, Rod 
Redwing, Willard 
Parker, Roy Barcroft 


Temopic Enterprises, S.A. 
(Robert Young, Eugene 
Rodney) 


Untitled 

(for CBS-TV) 


Comedy 


Eugene Rodney 


Robert Young 


Bill Thomas, 
Sam White 


Ski Patrol 
(for NBC-TV) 


Action-Adventure 


Bill Thomas, 
Sam White 


Not cast 


Danny Thomas, Sheldon 


The Joey Bishop Show 


Comedy 


Sheldon Leonard 


Joey Bishop 


Leonard, Louis Edelman 


All in a Day’s Work 
My 15 Blocks 


Comedy 

Comedy 


Sheldon Leonard 
Sheldon Leonard 


Dick Van Dyke 
Not cast 


Todon Productions 
(Donna Reed, Tony 
Owen) 


Love and Kisses 
(tent, title) 


Comedy 


Tony Owen 


Jeanne Crain, 
John Vivyan, 
Jack Mullaney 


Ivan Tors 


Sky Divers 


Action 


Ivan Tors 


J anet Lake, Ken 
Curtis 


Towers of London 
(with NTA) 


Mantovani 


Musical 


Harry Towers 


Mantovani and 
orchestra 


Trans-Lux 


It’s a Wonderful World 


Travelogue 


Carl Dudley 


John Cameron Swayze 


20th Century-Fox TV 


Tanganyika (60 min.) 

(for ABC-TV) 

The J ayhawkers 
(60 min.) 

Bus Stop (60 min.) 

(for ABC-TV) 
Monte Carlo 
(60 min.) 

(tent, title) 

(for NBC-TV) 

The Circus (60 min.) 

(for ABC-TV) 
Silent Investigators 
(60 min.) 

Ginger Rogers Show 
Margie 


Action-Adventure 

Western 

Comedy 

Adventure 

Drama 

Action 

Comedy 

Comedy 


Roy Huggins 
Roy Huggins 

William Hawks 
Charles Russell 
William Self 


Not cast 
Not cast 
Not cast 
Not cast 

Not cast 

Not cast 

Not cast 
Not cast 


Warner Bros. 


The Force (60 min.) 
Las Vegas File 
(60 min.) 

(for ABC-TV) 
Solitaire (60 min.) 

Room, for One More 
(for ABC-TV) 


Action 

Adventure 

Action-Adventure 

Comedy 


Joseph Mansfield 
J ules Schermer 

Howie Horwitz 


Not cast 

Peter Breck, Mike 
Road 

Ray Danton, John 
van Dreelen 
Andrew Duggan, 
Peggy McCay 


WardSon Productions 
(Hal Hudson, Ralph 
Edwards) 


My Client Is Innocent 


Drama 


Hal Hudson 


Not cast 


Yankee Productions 
(Wilbur Stark) 


The Further Adven- 
tures of the Con- 
necticut Yankee 


Comedy-Adventure 


Wilbur Stark 


Not cast 


Collier Young Associates 


Crime and Punishment 


Documentary 


Collier Young 




Ziv-UA 


The King of Diamonds 


Action 


John Robinson 


Broderick Crawford 




Ross of the Everglades 
(for CBS-TV) 


Action- Adventure 


Budd Schulberg, 
Stuart Schulberg 


Not cast 



Careful pre-planning in the production & use of TV 
commercials is the best way to keep the new SAG-AFTRA 
contract rates (Vol. 1.6:51. p.3) from hurting too much, 
Harry Saz, Ted Bates vp, told the. Holly wood Ad Club last 
week. He was also of the opinion that local stations would 
not lose business under the new rates, except as sponsors 
cut down on duplicate coverage. Another panelist, Stanley 
Plesent, legal counsel for Y&R, pointed out that 90% of 
commercials are filmed and within SAG’s jurisdiction; 10% 
are taped and within AFTRA jurisdiction. 



NEW YORK ROUNDUP 



Add syndication sales: Screen Gems off-network rerun 
series Tightrope has been sold to WGN-TV Chicago, bring- 
ing the market total to 95 . , . Ziv-UA has added 17 mo-re 
markets in its 4th-season sales for Sea Hunt, bringing the 
total to 121. New sales include WPRO-TV Providence and 
WISN-TV Milwaukee . . . Seven Arts sold its 40-feature 
post-1950 Warner package to 10 more stations, 9 of which 
bought colorcasting rights. Total market figure is now 31, 
with new sales including KTVU Oakland, WSB-TV Atlanta, 
WBRZ Baton Rouge. 



HOLLYWOOD ROUNDUP 




14 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



Programming 

Debate Effect on Voting Is Spelled Out: The speculation 

about TV’s strong role in the recent Presidential election 
takes on the actuality of figures in a survey made for CBS 
by Elmo Roper and revealed for the first time by Pres. 
Frank Stanton in Jan. 14 TV Guide. The survey finds that: 

(1) 57% of all voters polled said the Debates had 
helped them to make their voting decisions. 

(2) 6% (or more than 4 million) of all U.S. voters 
made their decision on the basis of the TV-radio Great 
Debates alone. 

(3) 72% of those 4-million-plus votes went to Sen. 
Kennedy, 26% to Vice President Nixon (2% wouldn’t say 
which way they went). 

“In view of this evidence,” Stanton noted, “there 
ought to be no doubt that debates would not only become a 
permanent feature of all future Presidential campaigns, 
but would be extended to campaigns for all elective offices. 

“That is not the case,” he emphasized in his article 
entitled “An Appeal to the American People,” which urges 
action to repeal Sec. 315. “Unless Congress takes action, 
such broadcasts will be illegal in 1964, in 1968, and in every 
future campaign. And only you — all of you who want more 
than campaign oratory on TV — can force Congress to act. 
The best way to do this is to tell your Congressmen how 
you feel ... We must remember that the crippling Sec. 315 
of the Communications Act is still on the statute books. 
And it will stay there unless we as citizens demand that it 
be repealed.” 

* * * 

The Nixon-Kennedy debates “stimulated interest” in 
the election, and “may have been influential in the out- 
come,” said Edward R. Murrow at the Jan. 12 RTES news- 
maker luncheon, but he thought “The Great Debates” were 
“mis-titled,” and described them as “a puny contribution 
. . . putting a premium on glibness & fluency.” He proposed 
a privately-financed national information institute to pro- 
vide much-needed public education on mass-media methods. 
It would create, Murrow said, “a more favorable climate” 
for ideals & purpose, analyze & publicize threats to the 
public welfare, such as censorship, and expose improper 
news handling. “The public-information field has been 
unbelievably neglected by endowers,” he said. “This pro- 
posal has been in my files since 1947, shelved for lack of 
funds. If it was urgent then, it is certainly more urgent 
now.” Praising the healthy network competition which 
produced, between Sept. 1 and Dec. 1, 1960, prime-time 
public-service programming “in unprecedented amounts,” 
Murrow noted broadcasting’s “greater willingness to deal 
with ideas.” 



Broadcast news-coverage of all public proceedings 
conducted by federal, state and local govts, is a TV-radio 
“right” which no longer should be denied, NAB TV vp 
Charles H. Tower told the biennial legislative dinner of the 
Neb. Bcstrs. Assn, in Lincoln. “Our microphones & our 
cameras belong in any proceeding where the public be- 
longs,” he added. “Long since has it been proved that our 
presence is not disruptive. Long since has it been proved 
that the good sense of broadcasters can be counted on to 
accord fair treatment.” Tower also renewed NAB’s cam- 
paign for repeal of equal-time Sec. 315 of the Communica- 
tions Act. “Archaic rules” circumscribing broadcasters’ 
handling of politics must go, he asserted. 



‘Untouchables’ Remain Untouched: Telegrams ricco- 

eheted like tommy-gun blasts last week and a new tech- 
nique of censorship pressure appeared as James V. Bennett, 
dir. of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons, carried on a one-man 
war against ABC-TV & “Eliot Ness.” Bennett’s beef was 
the 2-part show, “The Big Train,” which dealt with the 
transfer of A1 Capone from Atlanta’s federal penitentiary 
to Alcatraz, scheduled in The Untouchables for Thursday 
evenings Jan. 5 & 12. 

Portrayal of U.S. prison officials was “utterly fan- 
tastic” in the Jan. 5 show, charged Bennett in a Jan. 10 
wire to AB-PT Pres. Leonard H. Goldenson. “To picture 
honest & courageous officers as venal, and a public institu- 
tion like the Atlanta penitentiary as toadying to a char- 
acter like Capone is an unforgivable public disservice,” he 
said. Bennett demanded that ABC yank the 2nd part of 
“The Big Train” until he could have a chance to discuss 
the matter with FCC and the Attorney General. 

ABC tried to make peace with a soothing Jan. 12 reply 
from vp & gen. counsel Omar F. Elder, acting for Golden- 
son (who was in Miami at affiliates meeting — see p. 7). 
ABC, wired Elder, had “no desire or intention to imply any 
reflections” on U.S. prison officials. He added that “the 
portrayal of one or 2 individual guards in an unfavorable 
light” (i.e., taking a bribe) shouldn’t be considered as cast- 
ing a general stigma on other members of the group. But 
he drew the line at stalling The Untouchables — particu- 
larly since Part 2 was due on the air that very night. 
“This program has been reviewed carefully,” Elder told 
Bennett. 

Threat To Protest License Renewal 

Then Bennett tried a new kind of pressure on ABC. 
Having determined that licenses of several ABC outlets 
were coming up for renewal, Bennett wired these stations 
that he considered the 2nd part of the show (which he 
hadn’t seen) as being “defamatory.” He would, he said, 
protest the stations’ license renewals before the FCC if 
they carried the show. The stations: ABC’s 5 TV o&o’s — 
WABC-TV N.Y., KGO-TV San Francisco, WBKB Chicago, 
KABC-TV Los Angeles, WXYZ-TV Detroit— and WFGA- 
TV Jacksonville, WLOF-TV Orlando, WPST-TV Miami, 
WEAT-TV West Palm Beach and WTAE Pittsburgh. 

Despite this last-ditch effort, ABC ran the episode 
anyway on Jan. 12 to no one’s great surprise. (The Desilu- 
produced series is a powerhouse in ABC’s nighttime lineup. 
In the 2nd of Nielsen’s Dec. 1960 NTI reports, the show 
was in 9th AA rank nationally, with a 27.5 rating and a 
12.4-million-home average.) As a precaution, however, 
ABC tossed in a disclaimer title at the end of the show to 
say that “The Big Train” wasn’t intended as a slur on 
U.S. prisons. No stations dropped the showing. 

When we talked to Bennett the day after the second 
show, he told us he planned to write to FCC Chmn.- 
designate Newton N. Minow (see p. 1), detailing his 
objections to The Untouchables and asking if Minow doesn’t 
think FCC should exercise some controls over such pro- 
gramming. “There’s far too much crime & horror on TV 
programs anyway,” he said. “This one tops them all for 
carnage & gore.” He said he was incensed personally by 
TV portrayals of law enforcement officers as heroes who 
themselves violate law & order. 

Bennett didn’t see the Jan. 12 A1 Capone story on TV. 
He was attending a testimonial dinner for outgoing At- 
torney General William P. Rogers. But one of his Prison 
Bureau aides taped a sound recording of it, and Bennett 
asked ABC-TV for a video tape so that he could view the 
show later. 



VOL. 17: No. 3 



15 



Bennett said that despite any disclaimers by producers 
of such crime shows, “there’s no question but what the 
audience thinks it is seeing portrayals of actual incidents 
— and present-day law-enforcement practices, at that.” 
* * * 

“The Untouchables” would be shot down in N.Y., if the 

state legislature should pass a bill proposed last week by 
Michael J. Capenegro (D-Queens). His measure — aimed at 
the show — would make it unlawful for TV & radio stations 
to broadcast programs which present any religious group, 
race or nationality in a degrading & criminal manner. The 
Untouchables has been charged with being less than com- 
plimentary in its portrayal of Italian characters. 

* * * 

Although “The Untouchables” is the best-liked show of 
viewers in the 18-to-34 age group, Wagon Train holds this 
honor from 35-to-49 and Lawrence Welk is No. 1 with the 
50-and-older group. These facts were brought out by 
TvQ’s December report. Interesting exclusivities also 
turned up. For instance, Rifleman, Hawaiian Eye and the 
Flintstones which appeared among the top 10 for the 18- 
to-34s did not achieve that list in the other 2 age groups. 
Candid Camera and Rawhide made the 35-to-49 top 10 
only. And in the 50-and-over group, the top 10 included 6 
titles which did not appear in the other two age groups: 
Welk, Ernie Ford, I’ve Got a Secret, To Tell the Truth, 
The Price is Right, and Fights. 



TV Critic Proxmire Relents: One of broadcasting’s harsh- 

est critics — Sen. Proxmire (D-Wis.), who filibustered 
against last year’s Harris-Pastore Act on grounds that its 
TV-radio-FCC reforms weren’t tough enough (Vol. 16:35 
p3) — now has some kind words for the industry. 

“There is still too much trivia on the air,” Proxmire 
said in a Senate speech which he titled “TV’s Great Con- 
tribution to American Democracy.” But he said that “in 
the past few months” he’s found there’s “another side to 
this story” and that he wanted to acknowledge “the 
tremendous job TV can do when it aims high.” 

Proxmire told his colleagues that his own awakening 
started with the “magnificent contribution” to political 
education & participation made by TV networks in the 
Great Debate Presidential-campaign series. “Thanks to 
TV, this was the best informed electorate in my judgment 
in our history,” Proxmire said. 

And it didn’t stop there, Proxmire said: “Other broad- 
casts have continued this high level of TV programming.” 
He cited “fine programs” which “deserve recognition:” 
NBC— “U-2 Affair,” “Sit-In,” “The Working Mother,” 
“The Cold Woman,” “Nigeria,” “Minuteman Missile,” 
“Birth Control,” “Algeria,” “Cuba,” “Federal Aid to 
Education.” CBS — “Harvest of Shame,” “The Influential 
Americans,” “Money & the Next President,” “Turmoil in 
Tokyo,” “Berlin — End of the Line.” ABC — “The Man & the 
Mandate,” “The Money Raisers,” “Yanki No!,” “Down the 
Road,” “The Rag Tent,” “Featherbedding?” 

“I think it is time that the Congress recognize how this 
magic medium transforms our democracy,” Proxmire said. 
He began putting transcripts of the shows into the Con- 
gressional Record to give his colleagues background read- 
ing matter on the subject. 

* * * 

Taped political shows featuring joint appearances by 
Pa. Sens. Clark (D) & Scott (R) are now carried in their 
home state (Vol. 16 ; 5 1 p8) by 10 TV & 33 radio stations. 



Mid-season replacement of Witness, a victim of low 
ratings, takes place on CBS-TV Feb. 9, despite CBS efforts 
to save it. Earlier this season the 60-min. show was out- 
rated by NBC-TV’s (Thu. 7:30-8:30 p.m.) The Outlaws. 
On Dec. 15 CBS hopefully moved Witness to the 9-10 p.m. 
slot— opposite The Untouchables. The rescue attempt 
proved disastrous. The 2nd Dec. NTI gives Witness a 9.2 
AA vs. Untouchables’ sizable 26.3. Witness may possibly 
pick up in the January NTI ratings, but by the time they 
are available, Gwnslinger, a new frontier series, will occupy 
that CBS 9-10 p.m. time period (under the full sponsor- 
ship of R. J. Reynolds, Witness co-sponsor). Another 
major mid-season shift is planned by ABC-TV, which is 
axing The Islanders (Sun. 9:30-10:30 p.m.). The show had 
an 18.7 AA in the first December Nielsen vs. 24.2 for the 
Dinah Shore Chevy Show, 26.3 for the Jack Benny Show & 
24.2 for Candid Camera. It will be replaced April 2 by 
Asphalt Jungle, also an MGM 60-min. package. 

Live TV & radio coverage of incoming President Ken- 
nedy’s news conferences will be initiated 6-6:30 p.m. Jan. 25 
at the first White House meeting with reporters following 
the Inauguration. The starting schedule for the precedent- 
making White House plan (Vol. 17:1 p2) was announced 
Jan. 11 in Palm Beach by Kennedy’s press secy. Pierre 
Salinger, following agreement with the networks. Locale 
of the Kennedy conferences will be auditoriums in the 
State or Commerce Dept. Bldgs., Salinger said, explaining 
that a room in the executive offices bldg, adjoining the 
White House which has been used by President Eisenhower 
is too small. 

TV & legislatures: KPHO-TV Phoenix telecast the 
complete opening session of the Arizona state legislature 
on Jan. 9, marking the first time live cameras had been 
permitted in the chambers • WIBW-TV Topeka made 
state TV history with a live remote pickup of Gov. John 
Anderson’s address to the Kansas state legislature. Here- 
tofore, TV cameras had been verboten. 

Educational Television 

Ford Foundation’s ETV investment increased to an 
8-year total of $20 million in the 1960 fiscal year (ended 
Sept. 30). Grants totaled more than $6.5 million: $865,445 
to 20 school systems for experiments in in-school TV teach- 
ing; $500,000 to a number of college-level institutions to 
release faculty members for ETV programming; $3.7 mil- 
lion to Midwest Program on Airborne TV Instruction; 
$400,000 for a 3rd year of NBC-telecast Continental Class- 
room; others. 

Federal-aid-to-ETV bill, reintroduced by Sens. Magnu- 
son (D-Wash.) & Schoeppel (R-Kan.) to provide $51 million 
for equipment purchases (Vol. 17:2 p3), is gaining bi-parti- 
san support. Added co-sponsors of the measure (S-205) 
include Sens. Metcalf (D-Mont.) & Cooper (R-Ky.). 



ORDER YOUR 1960 BOUND VOLUME 

We will bind & index all 1960 copies of Tele- 
vision Digest, Vol. 16, including supplements and 
special reports. This embossed hard-cover volume — 
the authoritative record of the television industry in 
1960 — is available at $25.00. Orders will be accepted 
through February 1, 1961. 



16 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



Congress 

Govt. Subsidies For TV: Election-reform proposals which 

pile up in Congress after each national campaign have 
been initiated at this session by Senate Majority Leader 
Mansfield (D-Mont.), who wants the public to help pay for 
political time on TV & radio. 

He introduced a bill (S-227) last week which would 
authorize payment of up to $1 million in govt, funds to 
the Democratic & Republican parties to reimburse them for 
broadcast expenditures in the campaigns for President & 
Vice President. Minority parties which got more than 1% 
of the popular vote in the preceding election would be 
eligible for $100,000 TV & radio subsidies. 

The idea of such political subsidies isn’t new. Mans- 
field himself was a co-sponsor of similar legislation sub- 
mitted to the last Congress by the late Sen. Neuberger 
(D-Ore.), who never got to the first legislative base of 
hearings with it (Vol. 16:3 pl4 et seq). Mansfield carries 
new influence in this session as his party’s floor leader, 
however, and his new bill may have more weight. It was 
backed up in the House by Rep. Monagan (D-Conn.), who 
introduced a similar bill (HR-2501). 

Arguing in a floor speech for the measure, Mansfield 
pointed out that in party budgets of “tens of millions of 
dollars” for Presidential campaigns, TV & radio are “a 
principal cost [and] the most important single devices of 
public discussion of the issues.” 

“I do not think it serves the national interests when 
the expenses for those who campaign to serve all the people 
must be financed by a relative handful of people & organi- 
zations which make large contributions directly or indi- 
rectly,” Mansfield told the Senate. 

He estimated that the $l-million subsidies would pay 
for less than 10 hours of “full national network coverage 
on radio & TV” for each major party. Moreover, to qualify 
for the payments, the party would have to shorten its 
campaign by holding its nominating convention after 
Sept. 1 instead of in the summer. 



Much-criticized USIA, target of repeated Congres- 
sional assaults for inadequate Voice of America program- 
ming overseas, was subjected to more prodding last week. 
A 9-member committee on Information Activities Abroad 
appointed by President Eisenhower reported that USIA & 
other projects must be stepped up — particularly in Africa 
& Latin America — if the U.S. is to cope with Communist 
threats. The group, which includes ex-USLA dir. George V. 
Allen, said “concrete, dramatic and timely” actions in a 
“progressively expanded” U.S. program are required. But 
the committee had little to say in criticism of VO A itself, 
concentrating its fire on what it said were shortcomings 
in educational & training assistance to other countries. 
The committee’s recommendations followed a release of a 
USIA report which said that Communist broadcasts, in a 
stepped-up propaganda war, are heard around the world 
now in 55 languages. Meanwhile, Sens. Humphrey (D- 
Minn.) & Yarborough (D-Tex.) called for more VOA broad- 
casts to Cuba & other Latin American countries. And 
USIA came in for further criticism in one of a series of 
task-force reports to President-elect Kennedy on problems 
his administration will face. A Kennedy advisory group 
headed by State Dept, appointee George W. Ball said USIA 
should “improve the quality of existing programs” before 
it expands its operations. The new USIA dir. may be 
editor Jonathan Daniels of the Raleigh News & Observer. 



Senate Commerce Committee headed by Sen. Magnuson 
(D-Wash.) probably will be unchanged in the 87th Con- 
gress. The 11 Democrats & 6 Republicans on the Committee 
last session were reassigned to it last week. The GOP Com- 
mittee on Committees agreed to try to win more minority 
spots on major committees, but last session’s Commerce 
ratio was retained in the initial assignments. Organization 
of House Committees for the new session wasn’t completed, 
but little change was expected in the makeup of the House 
Commerce Committee under Rep. Harris (D-Ark.). 

Stations 

Radio Code Tightened: NAB’s 9-man Radio Code Review 

Board under Cliff Gill (KEZY Anaheim, Cal.) voted last 
week to adopt Federal Alcohol Control Act definitions of 
alcoholic beverages to make sure no subscriber is confused 
about the industry’s ban on hard-liquor commercials. 

In other actions in 2-day Washington sessions, the 
Board also: (1) Set up a subcommittee to look over com- 
mercials for personal products. (2) Recommended that 
NAB’s Radio Board act at its next meeting Feb. 8 in Palm 
Springs, Cal. to restrict the number of spots permitted on 
participating programs. (3) Voiced “concern” over commer- 
cials for some motion pictures and urged stations to work 
with advertisers to eliminate objectionable features. 

Without referring to commercials for Kahlua coffee 
liqueur carried by non-subscribing KDAY Santa Monica 
(Vol. 17:2 p6), the Code Board reaffirmed its hard-liquor 
ban. It said that hereafter the distinctions between com- 
mercials for malt beverages & wines (permitted by the 
Code) and distilled spirits (banned) would be spelled out 
by the language of the Federal Alcohol Control Act. And 
the law makes it plain that liqueurs are distilled spirits. 

Appointed to the special subcommittee on product & 
copy acceptability — to study the touchy question of adver- 
tising for personal pi-oducts (such as hemorrhoid remedies 
which the TV Code frowns on) — were Cecil Woodland, 
WEJL Scranton; Elmo Ellis, WSB Atlanta; Robert B. 
Jones Jr., WFBR Baltimore. 

New NAB Pres. Leroy Collins, marking his first week 
in office (see p. 3), sat in for part of the Code Board ses- 
sions. He also spoke briefly at a meeting earlier in Wash- 
ington of NAB’s AM committee, headed by C. L. (Chet) 
Thomas, KXOK St. Louis. 



FAA tower hearings to determine whether new broad- 
cast structures are a hazard to air safety would be “a tre- 
mendous waster of manpower, time & money,” NAB TV vp 
Charles H. Tower testified last week. Appearing at a pre- 
liminary FAA hearing on its rule-making proposal for 
evaluation of towers (Vol. 17:2 p6), Tower pointed out 
that FCC is the final licensing authority anyway. He ar- 
gued that “elaborate & extremely formal” hearings by 
F AA would be duplicative and would “only serve to make 
even longer an already time-consuming procedure.” Tower 
was among 21 witnesses — many of them representing avia- 
tion interests supporting FAA’s proposals — who turned up 
for the hearing. Generally backing NAB’s position were 
Eugene F. Mullin, Assn, of Maximum Service Telecasters; 
Robert M. Booth Jr., Federal Communications Bar Assn.; 
A. H. Church, Storer Bcstg. Co. 

Move to new studio-office building by KHQ-TV (Ch. (>) 
Spokane was marked by a Dec. 9-11 open house at 4202 S. 
Regal. The station has also moved its transmitter from 
4102 S. Regal to Tower Mt., where a 904-ft. tower is up. 



VOL. 17: No. 3 



17 



NEW & UPCOMING STATIONS: CJCH-TV (Ch. 5) Hali- 
fax, N.S. began operation Jan. 1 as an independent out- 
let to raise that country’s operating total to 79 stations. 
It’s city’s 2nd outlet; CBC’s CBHT (Ch. 3) began in ’54. 

CJCH-TV has a 5-kw Canadian GE transmitter and is 
using a GE antenna on a temporary 124-ft. tower on 
Geizers Hill. It expects to have its 600-ft. Wind Turbine 
tower ready for use in February. Studios at 741 Robie St. 
are scheduled for completion by mid-March. The licensee 
also operates radio CJCH. Finlay McDonald is pres., gen. 
mgr. & principal owner. Don G. Hildebrand, ex-CKNX-TV 
Wingham, Ont., is asst. gen. mgr. & film buyer. Don Blois, 
ex-CBHT, is supervisor of TV; Dennis Benwell, operations 
mgr.; John Jay, dir. of engineering. Base hour is $300. 
Reps are Young, Paul Mulvihill, A. J. Messner and Scharf 
Broadcast Sales. 

* * * 

In our continuing survey of upcoming stations, here 
are the latest reports received from principals : 

KIFI-TV (Ch. 8) Idaho Falls, Ida., planning Jan. 16 
test patterns, is keeping to its Jan. 23 target to start with 
NBC-TV, reports James M. Brady, pres.-gen. mgr. It has 
a 28-kw GE transmitter and the antenna is installed on a 
100-ft. tower from Tower Construction Co. Base hour will 
be $275. Rep will be Meeker. 

KCDA (Ch. 3) Douglas, Ariz. has a 500-watt Electron 
transmitter scheduled for shipment Jan. 6 and expects to 
begin programming Jan. 27, according to Mort Zimmerman, 
pres, of owner Electron Corp. A Jampro antenna has been 
installed on a 100-ft. Rohn tower on the roof of the Gadsden 
Hotel in Douglas. Base hour will be $150. Rep not chosen. 

KAET (Ch. 8, Educational) Phoenix, Ariz. has begun 
construction and hopes to begin programming in January, 
according to production mgr. Sheldon P. Siegel, reporting 
for owner Arizona State U. The station has a Du Mont 
transmitter which was acquired from KVAR (Ch. 12) 
Phoenix and a 61-ft. tower with a 36-ft. antenna on South 
Mt. Richard H. Bell, dir. of Bureau of Broadcasting at the 
U., will be gen. mgr. Lynn E. Dryer will be chief engineer. 

KFOY-TV (Ch. 9) Hot Springs, Ark. has a Feb. 1 
target, reports gen. mgi\ Harold E. King, ex-radio KOKL 
Okmulgee, Okla. It will be part of Donrey Media Group 
(Donald W. Reynolds) which operates KLRJ-TV Las Vegas, 
KOLO-TV Reno, KFSA-TV Fort Smith, Ark., 5 radio sta- 
tions and a newspaper chain. KFOY-TV is conducting 
proof-of-performance tests with a 500-watt Gates trans- 
mitter and a 310-ft. Truscon tower with a 6-bay RCA 
antenna. Base hour will be $150. Rep will be Headley- 
Reed (whose business is to be taken over by Bolling). 

CFCF-TV (Ch. 12) Montreal, Que. plans to begin as an 
English-language outlet Jan. 20, writes business mgr. 
Vin Dittmer. Owner is Canadian Marconi Co. The station 
will get on the air by using temporary studios and a single 
18-kw transmitter and a temporary tower with 3-bay Alford 
slotted ring antenna. Partial occupancy of the permanent 
Ogilvy Ave. studios is scheduled for Jan. 31. S. B. Hay- 
ward, ex-CKPT Peterborough, will be program mgr. Base 
hour will be $1,000. Reps: Weed and All-Canada. 

CHCB-TV (Ch. 10) Banff, Alta. — call letters pending 
approval — is expected to get on the air as a satellite by 
the end of January, reports G. A. Bartley, pres, of parent 
CHCA-TV (Ch. 6) Red Deer, Alta. 

CHBC-TV (Ch. 5) Keremeos, B.C. will begin operation 
early this year as a satellite of CHBC-TV (Ch. 2) Kelowna, 
B.C., according to R. L. Sharp, sales mgr. It will begin 
as an automatic unattended repeater of CHBC-TV. 



Advertising 

FTC ‘CAUGHT FIRE,’ SAYS KINTNER: Anti-decepticm-&- 
monopoly policemen in FTC’s force had their biggest & 
liveliest year in 1960, reaching peak activity in cam- 
paigns against payola & misleading TV commercials, 
Chmn. Earl W. Kintner boasted in a valedictory report. 

“I like to believe that the Commission’s staff has 
caught fire with enthusiasm for the purposes this agency 
serves,” Republican Kintner said in a windup accounting, 
as he prepared to leave FTC for private law practice. 

As FTC’s “most conspicuous action,” Kintner cited last 
year’s anti-payola drive which produced 83 complaints & 90 
cease-&-desist orders against record manufacturers & dis- 
tributors accused of making under-the-turntable promotion 
payments to TV & radio disc jockeys. 

Kintner also pointed with pride to the ad-policing 
agency’s attacks on demonstrations in TV commercials 
which he said exaggerated the merits of one product over 
another. Camera trickery or distortions of facts were 
exposed by FTC in commercials for at least 7 widely- 
advertised products, he said. Another advance marked up 
by Kintner: FTC actions against sellers of reconditioned 
TV tubes represented as new. 

All told, 560 FTC complaints & 410 orders last year — 
topping any performance figures in FTC’s 46-year history 
— were totted up by Kintner. The number of 1960 com- 
plaints was 52% higher than in 1959, the previous record 
year. The number of orders went up 36% last year. 

Meanwhile, President Eisenhower, in a courtesy ges- 
ture, renominated Kintner for a 7-year term on FTC from 
Sept. 26, 1960. The nomination was among several hundred 
dumped on the Senate Jan. 10 by the President in an end- 
of-the-administration move. Kintner was given no more 
chance of confirmation by the Democratic Senate than he 
had last year, when his name was passed up pending out- 
come of the Presidential election (Vol. 16:34 p5). 

President-elect Kennedy’s selection of a Democratic 
successor to Kintner was reported imminent last week. 
Speculation on his probable choice centered on 4 men: 
Ex-FTC attorney Paul Rand Dixon, staff dir. of the Senate 
Judiciary Anti-Trust & Monopoly Subcommittee (Vol. 16:47 
p8). Ex-FTC member Albert A. Carretta, who left Com- 
mission in 1954 after a 2-year hitch. Ex-FTC staffer Ever- 
ette MacIntyre, gen. counsel of the House Small Business 
Committee. Albert G. Siedman, FTC attorney in charge of 
the agency’s N.Y. office. 

* * * 

Lanolin Plus Inc. has denied FTC charges that its 
advertising made false therapeutic claims for its vitamin- 
&-mineral preparation Rybutol. Asking dismissal of the 
complaint, Lanolin said FTC had taken Rybutol promo- 
tional statements out of advertising context to make a 
case. Among alleged misrepresentations cited by FTC 
were purported claims that the preparation pi'ovided “pep, 
strength and energy overnight.” 



Local TV & radio commercials — but not nationally- 
broadcast advertising — are covered by last year’s excise- 
tax-law amendments that permit manufacturers to make 
deductions for co-op ads (Vol. 16:38 pl7), according to 
proposed Internal Revenue Service regulations. If deduc- 
tions are claimed for national advertising, they should be 
allowed only for portions of commercials which identify 
local retailers in co-op promotion plans, IRS said. 



18 



JANUARY 16. 1961 



FTC’s Kern Assails Landis: One of the 2 Democrats on the 

5-man Federal Trade Commission came out swinging last 
week against President-elect Kennedy’s regulatory agency 
advisor James M. Landis, accusing him of trying “to sell 
out the public interest” in his recommendations for FTC 
reforms (Vol. 17:1 pi). 

In one of the few public statements made by any 
member of any govt, agency since Landis filed his highly- 
critical report with Kennedy, FTC member William C. 
Kern chose the forum of a Jan. 14 meeting of the Mechan- 
ical Contractors Assn, of Texas Inc. in Houston to blast 
away at it. 

“I will not stand idly by & preside over the dismember- 
ment of the Federal Trade Commission,” Kern paraphrased 
Winston Churchill in a speech prepared for the Houston 
meeting. He said a Landis proposal to transfer FTC’s 
anti-trust jurisdiction (except for Robinson-Patman Act 
cases) to the Justice Dept, would result in “emasculation 
[of FTC] in the important & vital area” of regulation. 

“Any efforts to remove our jurisdiction in this vital 
area I regard as inimical to the public interest,” Kern went 
on, pointing to “shackles” which he said the Justice Dept, 
already had placed on FTC’s handling of anti-trust cases. 
Instead of recommending that Justice take them over, 
Landis should have urged that FTC’s prosecution powers 
be strengthened, Kern said. 

Describing himself as a “very partisan” Democrat, 
Kern said: “I assure you that for me to be compelled to 
oppose even a single proposal made in a report released by 
the Democratic National Committee gives me no satisfac- 
tion.” 

But Kern protested that the Landis recommendation 
would weaken enforcement of FTC & Clayton Acts. He 
said he couldn’t “understand how the present leadership 
within my party can tolerate any tinkering with these 2 
great statutes which were basic keystones of ‘the new 
freedom’ under Woodrow Wilson.” He added: “I don’t 

believe that on mature reflection the architects of ‘the 
new frontier’ will tolerate the emasculation of those great 
statutory monuments.” 

Kern joined FTC in 1941 as a trial attorney. He was 
promoted to Commission membership in 1955 by President 
Eisenhower for a 7-year term. 

* * * 

New “sales talk” concepts may have to be learned by 
some ebullient TV advertisers if they want to keep out of 
FTC trouble, bi’oadcast-monitoring chief Charles A. Sweeny 
told the Chicago Advertising Executives Club. He said it’s 
one thing for an old-fashioned pitchman to peddle his 
products on the street with absurd claims — and something 
else again when the technique is used on TV. Or as Sweeny 
put it: “We may reach the point where we recognize a 
distinction between the oral representation ‘mine is the 
greatest product in the world,’ and a demonstration on TV 
which is interpreted factually when it visually depicts 
mine with somewhat exaggerated values, and competitive 
products in a less fortunate light. We have all learned to 
recognize a sales talk when we hear it. But that which we 
actually see demonstrated on a TV screen somehow becomes 
a factual & authoritative presentation which we are not 
adjusted to so discount, and therefore believe literally.” 
Sweeny also stressed a warning given previously to TV 
advertisers by FTC Chmn. Earl W. Kintner: The quality 
of a product may be unquestioned, but commercials for it 
will be challenged if they employ TV trickery (Vol. 17:2). 



Television. Digest 

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WALTER H. ANNENBERG, President 

PUBLICATION OFFICE Radnor, Pa., MUrray 8-3940, TWX: Radnor 1028 



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Copyright 1961, by Triangle Publications, Inc. 



Personals: Michael P. Boland, ABC asst, treas., elected 

vp. Other ABC vps elected: Robert L. Coe, vp in charge of 
TV station relations; Bert Briller, vp in charge of TV net- 
work sales development; Elton Rule, Ben Hoberman & 
David M. Sacks, vp-gen. mgrs. of o&o’s KABC-TV L.A., 
radio KABC & KGO-TV San Francisco respectively. 

Francis P. Barron, ex-gen. sales mgr., WJW-TV Cleve- 
land, named gen. sales mgr. of Storer’s new national TV 
sales rep organization . . . Louis J. Hummel Jr., formerly in 
charge of Peters, Griffin, Woodward Detroit office, moves to 
Chicago office, succeeded in Detroit by James R. Sefert, 
ex-Crosley Bcstg. Co. 

Ann Corrick of WBC’s Washington news bureau be- 
comes first woman president of Radio-TV Correspondents 
Assn., governing body of Senate & House TV & radio 
galleries . . . Walter Cronkite named “outstanding TV & 
radio personality of 1960” by Ad Club of Baltimore. 

William T. Klumb resigns as national sales mgr. of 
WTMJ-TV Milwaukee to enter a new business . . . Hill W. 
Hastings, ex-Remington Rand, named RAB promotion mgr. 

George Wilson promoted to promotion-publicity dir. of 
WSTV-TV Steubenville-Wheeling . . . Harold J. Algus, 
ex-NTA, named trade & business news dir., Metropolitan 
Bcstg. Corp. Mary Garcia, ex-McCann-Erickson, named 
MBC international media research mgr. 



Creutz, Steel & Snowberger is the new name of the 
former Page, Creutz, Steel & Waldschmitt organization, 
Washington engineering firm. Esterly C. Page and Joseph 
A. Waldschmitt have withdrawn. The partners are John 
Creutz, David L. Steel Sr. & Arthur Snowberger; Willis C. 
Beecher is an associate. 

FCC Chmn. and Mrs. Frederick W. Ford are expecting 
their first child in July. He has a daughter, Mary Carter 
Ford, 14, by his first wife, who died in Feb. 1958. Mrs. 
Ford is the former Mary Margaret Mahony of Blackstone, 
Mass. They were married in Oct. 1959. 

Meetings this week: RTES timebuying & selling 
seminar (January 17). Robert (Bucky) Buchanan, J. 
Walter Thompson TV-radio group head, will speak on Ford 
Motor’s use of broadcasting, Hotel Lexington, N.Y. • 
Advertising Assn, of the West mid-winter conference (21- 
22), Pioneer Hotel, Tucson. 




VOL. 17: No. 3 



19 



• • 



MANUFACTURING, DISTRIBUTION, FINANCE 



I960 TV PRODUCTION — 5,716,268: El A closed the book on 1960 TV-radio production last 

week. Its tally showed 5,716,268 TVs produced last year, and 17,135,114 radios. The latter figure included 
6,438,658 auto radios. 

Thus TV winds up the year with production, distributor sales & retail sales almost perfectly in line — 
after several hectic months when production far outstripped the sharply curtailed sales which began to show 
up in the latter half of last year. Last year's TV production was the 3rd lowest yearly figure since 1949, 
exceeding only the 4,920,428 of 1958 and the 5,384,798 of 1951 — both considered "recession" years. Here's 
lineup of annual TV production since 1947: 



1947 


178,571 


1952 


6,096,280 


1957 


6,399,345 


1948 


975,000 


1953 


7,215,827 


1958 


4,920,428 


1949 


3,000,000 


1954 


7,346,715 


1959 


6,349,380 


1950 


7,463,000 


1955 


7,756,521 


1960 


5,716,268 


1951 


5,384,798 


1956 


7,387,029 







Radio production presented a completely different picture, the 17,135,114 sets made in 1960 being 2nd 
highest amount ever produced in a single year. That sum is exceeded only by post-war 1947's estimated 20 
million. In only one other year — 1948 — has radio output even come within million units of last year's figure. 

Last year also saw the 2nd highest annual production of auto radios. Almost a million units higher 
than 1959, apace with last year's high new-car sales, 1960's car radio output of 6,438,658 units was surpassed 
only in the peak year of 1955 (6,864,000 units). 

To complete the 1960 weekly production count reported in these pages, here is the picture from EIA 
of the final statistical week of 1960 (ended Dec. 30) with comparative figures (year's totals subject to slight 
changes after final EIA audit): 

Dec. 24-30 Preceding wk. 1959 wk. 1960 1959 



TV 31,511 81,762 76,643 5,716,268 6,349,380 

Total radio 127,045 271,255 218,846 17,135,114 15,622,357 

auto radio 94,579 91,631 94,868 6,438,658 5,555,155 



• • • • 

TV layoffs & plant shutdowns were reflected in EIA's production figures for 196 l's first week (actu- 
ally a 4-working-day week because of New Year's Day holiday). TV output was less than half that of 1960's 
first week (5 working days). Here is EIA's production report for Dec. 31-Jan. 6, 1961 (corresponding first-1 960- 
week figures in parentheses): TV production, 50,853 sets (104,953); total radios, 194,904 (306,636); auto radios, 
89,389 (175,138). 

QUALITY STRESSED AT QUIET MART: TV-stereo quality, reliability & furniture value 

received greatest attention yet at last week's International Home Furnishings Market and at various sideshows 
of non-participating manufacturers. Despite the presence of some dumps & winter-market specials, at 
week's end there was no sign of a price collapse — and some set makers were predicting increases. Fewer 
midwinter drop-in models were introduced than usual. 

The market's new format — 10 consecutive days starting on Friday — brought near-unanimous com- 
plaints from TV-radio manufacturers and provided added ammunition for a revival of "let's-get-out-of-the- 
Mart" drive by several consumer-electronics makers. At Saturday & Sunday sessions, TV sets on Chicago 
Merchandise Mart's 11th floor far outnumbered people — but this year's format is due for another try next year 



20 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



before there can be thought of returning to the old schedule of 2 weeks beginning Monday & excluding 
Saturday & Sunday. 

Here are highlights of this year's winter International Home Furnishings Market , and the Chicago 
fringe showings, as we observed them: 

New Sets & Features: Most manufacturers were pulling out all the stops in touting the "quality" 

of their sets. Drop-ins were relatively few, most lines being left pretty much intact. Magnavox, with no 
annual model change, threw in a brand new feature — new to U.S. TV at any rate: a "TV light meter," which 
automatically adjusts contrast & brightness to room light. It is initially on four 27-in. models, but eventually 
will "be incorporated throughout the line," adding about $10-to-$15 to the retail price. 

Stress on TV-stereo furniture gained momentum, and, in what is probably the ultimate in "furnituriz- 
ing," Westinghouse unveiled its long-in-preparation offer to provide individualized mail-order home-decoration 
service to all customers who buy console TVs or stereo during February & March. That manufacturers are 
giving increased attention to the public's furniture desires was evidenced by the increase in stress on walnut 
& hand-rubbed oil finishes, Danish modern cabinets. (Details of new sets & innovations on p. 22.) 

Warranties: Emphasis on quality also was reflected by liberalized warranty programs, announced 

& in the wind. Philco's 90-day inboard labor & parts warranty for all its TVs (Vol. 17:1 pl7) unquestionably 
is the forerunner of an industry trend. Others, of course, already have some form of increased warranty 
protection: Westinghouse, with labor & parts coverage on all 19-in. portables and on low-end stereo; 
Magnavox, whose "Gold Seal Warranty" on all above-$279 TVs & stereos guarantees labor for 90 days, 
parts for one year. GE, RCA, Admiral are typical of manufacturers which have made liberal warranties 
available, at the discretion of distributors. 

Outlook now is for industrywide labor & parts guarantees, in the opinion of manufacturers we spoke 
with in Chicago. Consensus: Set quality today is so good that service needed in first 90 days has dwindled 
to an easily absorbed rate. Ergo, offer of labor & parts protection, either inboard or out, is essentially "a 
merchandising gimmick," as one maker put it. "Gimmick" or no, liberalized warranties hypo the set maker's 
quality story, and all manufacturers we talked to are checking into stretchability of their current policies. 

Prices: While leader models in TV, radio & stereo lines are trending downwards in most cases, 

there's real determination to hold the price line generally, and to jockey into position for spring & summer 
rises. Some manufacturers already have sneaked through some middle-of-the-line boosts, while Zenith has 
widespread rises in its revamped line (Vol. 17:1 pl5). Others silently nod assent to the view of Admiral Sales 
Corp. electronics vp Ross D. Siragusa Jr., who told us: "Costs keep going up. We hope to pass this on, and 
we're going to try by March 1." 

O pinion was pretty evenly divided on GE's neat-looking 19-in. portable at $159.95. Some thought 
it a good traffic-building move and step-up bait, pointing out that several competitive open-list 19-in. leaders 
could be sold profitably at the same price or lower. There were some complaints that such prices will remove 
profits at all levels, but no new announcements of competitive list prices by major manufacturers. Several 
manufacturers, however, did show 19-in. sets at $169.95. 

There were the usual midwinter specials, giveaways, premiums, etc. And one new line — Symphonic 
Electronic's private-label "Philharmonic" TV for large-scale key accounts. Symphonic officials were touting 
the success of the Philharmonic debut in a recent promotional sale at Boston's Jordan Marsh dept, store, 
which featured lowest-yet price leaders — 19-in. portable at $116.90 and 23-in. console at $139.90 (see p. 22). New 
clock radios shown at Mart generally began at $19.95 (4-tube), U.S.-made 6-transistor sets at $24.95. 

Color: Same old story. Those with color like it, those without it are bearish. With no fanfare 

(in order not to hurt sales of holdover sets), RCA showed pictures on its new "high-fidelity color tube," now in 
all but 2 models. Pictures were sharper, brighter (up to 50%, claims RCA), with no trailing or smearing in 
action scenes. Admiral called color "fantastic," with sales running 30% ahead of last year. Olympic said 
its color combos were selling as well as its comparably priced b&w sets. 

Picture Tubes: Battle over picture-tube shielding continued hot & heavy . More non-bonded 

models were seen at this year's mart than last. Striking hard at Corning bonded-tube claims of eye ease & 
freedom from reflection, Magnavox demonstrated its own external safety-glass feature alongside 2 sets with 



VOL. 17: No. 3 



21 



Corning shields in a back room behind its exhibit. Magnavox tilts the entire picture tube, frame and tinted filter 
glass 3 degrees downward to avoid reflections, claims this is a simpler, more effective approach. Several 
large manufacturers expressed enthusiasm about the new simplified Pittsburgh Plate Glass bonded-tube 
process, but nobody's using it yet. (RCA had considered it for its new color tube, but dropped the idea, at 
least temporarily.) 

Coming's "Operation Snowball " TV-industry promotion drive seemed to be marking time, and 
suffered because its exhibit was 3 floors above the TV showcases. Sylvania was the sole manufacturer 
displaying "Snowball" placards, but several others with whom we talked indicated they would probably 
go along if they could be convinced it wasn't a drive to promote bonded tubes. Corning officials hope to make 
a revised pitch to TV makers after the mart, eliminating bonded-tube pitch (Vol. 16:52 pl7). 

Imports: There was more talk among TV manufacturers about competition from imports this year. 

Reason: This competition is an established fact, thanks to aggressive Delmonico International, importing 
Japanese TVs & TV-stereo combinations at the rate of 4,000 a month. In addition to its 19-in. portable (list 
$159.95), Delmonico showed a 19-in. TV-stereo-FM-AM combo at $299.95 and 23-in. combo at $449.95, both 
to enter distribution early in February. It also plans soon to have a lower-priced 19-in. portable, which will 
be Underwriter's Labs approved. 

Only other mass importer of TV sets — Majestic International — indicated it's going to peddle TV sets 
more in earnest this year, albeit still only in high-end models. Replacing its former fancy $2,995 TV-stereo 
combo is a 23-in. Grundig-made German combo (with U.S. tube) listing at $795 (which could be sold profitably 
at about $595) and a 23-in. consolette at $475 (to be discounted at $399?) — both with some unique features. 
Majestic brought more than 500 TV sets in from Germany last month. (For details on Delmonico & Grundig- 
Majestic TV sets & plans, see p. 23.) 

New Consumer-Electronics Show? " This market is a ridiculous habit of the trade. After this 
show, we're going to get out & invite dealers to our conventions instead. Even our competitors can come if 
they want." So said one long-time Merchandise Mart exhibitor in the latest round of ditch-the-Mart talk. 
Requesting that his identity be withheld, this marketing topkick said: "We used to sell 8-to- 10,000 pieces at this' 
show. Now the dealers just come in & say, 'What's to dump?' " 

At least 3 manufacturer officials were discussing the possibility of a completely separate consumer- 
electronics trade show — including TV, phonos, radios, hi-fi components and possibly even parts. There was 
some talk of approaching EIA (co-sponsor of the May Parts Show) to assume sponsorship. 

Equal & opposite reactions were easy to find , too. Several manufacturers said the value of the Mart 
— particularly the summer market — was that it provides contact with furniture dealers, just as the NAMM 
Music Trade Show brings in music dealers. There was near unanimity, however, that the NAMM show is now 
becoming bigger in consumer electronics than the Chicago Mart. There was some sentiment for combining 
the summer Mart with the NAMM show. 

Business Trends: The bubbling optimism of last year's Mart was completely missing. In its place 

was a silent prayer of thanks — by both manufacturers & dealers — that inventories are in good shape and 
things could be far worse. Gloom-&-doom talk was absent, and the magnitude of announced promotion 
campaigns gave evidence that just about everybody plans to scratch hard for business. Westinghouse TV- 
radio mktg. mgr. C. J. Urban summed up the general view when he said: "People are willing to spend money 
if you give them value." 

Motorola consumer-products exec, vp Edward R. Taylor , who is also chmn. of EIA's consumer-products 
div., was mildly optimistic for 1961 in a Mart news conference. He didn't rule out the possibility of a business 
boom this year — due to possible international developments or Kennedy administration anti-recession moves. 
And he had this advice: 

"Whichever way the economy goes, the best bet is to play it close to the vest . Keep a tight rein on 
costs & overhead . . . play inventories safely . . . don't go in for any unnecessary expenses. This is no time 
for anticipating — but it's a good time to be alert & ready to move & move fast when the indicators show up." 



Harman-Kardon’s new address is Plainview, L.I., N.Y. List of govt, publications on electronics, electricity, 

(OVerbrook 1-4000). The company has completed its move radar & radio, revised & enlarged, is now available from 
from Westbury, N.Y. to its new 52,000-sq.-ft. plant. U.S. Govt. Printing Office, Washington 25. 



22 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



more about 

NEW SETS & FEATURES: The International Home Fur- 
nishings Market last week at Chicago’s Merchandise 
Mart brought little really new in sets or features (see 
p. 19) . Most of the relatively few new TV models in- 
troduced this winter had already been shown to dealers 
by distributors. These have been reported in recent 
issues (Vol. 17 :1 pl5, 2 pl7). 

The still-mushrooming trend to better furniture — to 
put TV & stereo into the “home furnishings” class — was 
the most obvious feature evident at the manufacturers’ 
displays. Among minor trends: (1) Increasing interest in 
27-in. sets, as exemplified by Magnavox’s heavy promotion 
of its recently introduced 27-in. price leader at $339.50; 
Du Mont’s introduction of a 27-in. model at $450; and re- 
ports that Warwick is preparing to resume 27-in. produc- 
tion for Sears Roebuck. (2) Continuing emphasis on TV- 
stereo combinations as a step-up product that can be sold 
to both TV & stereo prospects. (3) Broadening of lines of 
FM radios, U.S.-made transistor sets and addition of low- 
priced clock radios. 

In stereo, reverb has settled down to the status of a 
“feature” — it’s apparently not the “revolutionary new type 
of sound reproduction” some thought it would be. Just 
about every phono maker (exception: Columbia) is making 
it available for customers who want it, at the very least. 
Many include it in all high-end sets as an extra feature. 
Almost completely missing from this winter’s show were 
claims of “3-channel stereo.” Although some manufac- 
turers still have 3 speaker systems or 3 amplifiers, they 
have stopped muddying the stereo waters with “3-channel” 
* claims. 

The only really & obviously new feature observed at 
the Mart is Magnavox’s “TV light meter.” This highly 
demonstrable gadget consists of a light-dependent sodium 
resistor mounted in a small circular window near the pic- 
ture tube. It varies the potential on the screen grid of the 
video amplifier tube on the basis of the amount of room 
light, automatically changing the brightness & contrast. 
Magnavox says it has filed for a patent on the system, 
which it claims is simpler than the photocell method used 
by several European manufacturers (including Grundig, 
whose impoi’ted photocell set is described on p. 23). The 
light meter, of course, will result in a price increase in the 
four 27-in. sets which now use it, and eventually in other 
sets when it is incorporated in them. 

Here’s a rundown on new sets & features not previous- 
ly reported : 

Magnavox — “Golden Spectacular” 27-in. at $339.50, 
lowboy color set (Magnavox’s 2nd) at $699.50, three 23-in. 
combos at $349.90 to $545, a 24-in. combo at $650, two 27-in. 
combos at $799.50 to $850, two 27-in. sets with FM radio 
tuners. The latter 4 sets have automatic light meter. In 
stereo, Magnavox added phonos at $169.50 & $199.50, six 
radio-phonos from $199.50 to $495. Also added was an 
FM-AM table radio at $49.95. Magnavox claims that com- 
binations now comprise 30% of its TV sales, as opposed to 
less than 4% for the industry as a whole. 

Westinghouse — Now in the 2nd year of its fine-furni- 
ture promotion, Westinghouse has launched a Feb.-March 
interior-decorating plan, under which leading decorators 
will suggest, by mail, arrangement of furniture, color 
schemes, etc. based on personal specifications of Westing- 
house console purchasers. Westinghouse’s “Curio Chest 
Collection” of really elaborate cabinets available separately 
to house its 19-in. TV sets is also getting a big play. 



Westinghouse added no TVs. New phonos: Portable 3- 
sound-system stereo, $79.95 with 90-day parts & labor war- 
ranty; monaural portable, $24.95. New radios: 4-tube 
clock radio, $19.95; 5-tube clock radio, open list; 6-transis- 
tor radio, $24.95. 

Motorola — In addition to the 4 sets reported last week, 
Motorola added four 19-in. table models at $169.95-$199.95. 

Philharmonic label has returned to TV — the pioneer 
brand having been restored by Symphonic Electronic Corp. 
as a special private label for direct selling to dept, stores 
and other key accounts. An early private-label TV manu- 
facturer, the old Philharmonic Radio & TV Corp. has since 
been merged with Symphonic. At its showrooms in Chi- 
cago’s Conrad Hilton Hotel during market week, Sym- 
phonic was telling dealers the story of its huge Philhar- 
monic promotion at Jordan Marsh dept, store in Boston — 
the same store where the Philharmonic label made its 
debut 10 years earlier. 

Prices of the Philharmonic TVs sold at the special sale 
which began Jan. 3 started at $116.90 for 19-in. portable, 
$139.90 for 23-in. console, $299.90 for 23-in. TV-stereo-FM- 
AM combo. Although many of the Philharmonic sets dis- 
played last week were identical to the Symphonic line, com- 
pany officials said the lines will become separate & distinct 
next summer. 

* * * 

DC-restoration circuit, an engineering rarity in TV 
sets, is now standard in all RCA color & 23-in. black-&- 
white sets. This technique, long known but little used, 
provides blacker blacks & whiter whites, prevents washout 
of picture details in contrasty scenes. Use of this circuit in 
RCA & Zenith sets (Vol. 17:1 pl8) may be the forerunner 
of its more extensive employment in high-end receivers. 



Trade Personals: L. S. Thees promoted from gen. com- 

mercial mgr. to new post of div. vp, gen. sales, RCA 
Electron Tube div. . . . Walter S. Holmes Jr., C.I.T. Finan- 
cial Corp. controller, elected a vp. He was formerly RCA 
controller. 

Samuel Schwartzstein, former gen. mgr. of Admiral 
N.Y.-N.J. branch distributing operation, appointed vp in 
charge of Admiral distributing branches . . . Frank R. 
Demmerly, ex-RCA, named Philco controller, John Bewley 
appointed general auditor . . . George R. Loux, ex-mfg. vp, 
named operations vp, National Co. . . . William H. Rous 
appointed Amphenol-Borg vp, international operations. 

Jerome B. Wiesner of MIT, noted electronic scientist, 
appointed President-elect Kennedy’s special asst, for science 
. . . Donald M. Krauss, formerly with GE’s projection & 
industrial TV projects, named to new post of mgr. of 
scanner projects, Gulton Industries . . . Edwin O. Cole, ex- 
Bendix, promoted to new position of dir. of industrial 
relations, Fairchild Camera & Instrument. 

William Grady named to new post of mfg. vp, Columbia 
Records . . . Glenn R. Lord named govt. mktg. vp, Raytheon; 
George Ingram Jr. appointed Raytheon finance vp. 

Obituary 

T. J. Newcomb, 63, mgr. of Westinghouse TV-radio 
div. from 1952 until his retirement in 1955, died Jan. 11 at 
his home in Max-gate City, N.J., after a brief illness. He 
joined Westinghouse in 1929 as supervisor of domestic re- 
frigeration. His wife survives. 



VOL. 17: No. 3 



23 



More about 

TV IMPORTS RISE: The only 2 active importers of TV 

sets — Delmonico & Majestic — displayed their wares 
last week in Chicago coincident with the International 
Home Furnishings Market (see p. 19). 

Gratified with the initial response to its 19-in. portable 
made by Victor of Japan, Delmonico introduced 2 new TV- 
phono-AM-FM models — 19-in. listing at $299.95 and 23-in. 
at $449.95 — both due early next month. Delmonico also is 
anticipating introduction of a new 19-in. — with less deluxe 
circuitry — in April or May. 

The new set will have series-string filaments instead 
of a power transformer, 2 IF stages instead of 3 in the 
current $159.95-list model. It will use some U.S.-made 
components (present Delmonico portable uses U.S.-made 
picture-tube only) in order ta get UL safety seal. This 
model will be salable in U.S. communities which now ban 
non-UL-approved electrical goods. And, significantly, it 
can be sold by mail-order houses — such as Sears Roebuck — 
which don’t list non-UL goods in their catalogs. Sears re- 
cently sold 4,000 Delmonico sets in a special promotion at 
$128 (Vol. 16:50 pl8), and there are hints that the new 
Delmonico portable will become a regular Sears catalog 
item — either under Delmonico or some other trade name. 

Delmonico’s goal, as reiterated to us last week by exec, 
vp Herbert Rabat, is 1% of the TV market — or 50-to-60,000 
sets a year. “We look upon ourselves as another source of 
TV for the industry,” he said. Does he expect to see other 
Japanese makes of TV in this country? “It’s very pos- 
sible,” says Rabat, but he doesn’t foresee a flood compar- 
able to the transistor radio deluge. He points out there 
are only 10 TV manufacturers in Japan, and therefore only 
10 sources of TV sets — not hundreds as in the transistor 
radio business. 

As to battery portable TVs and color sets from Japan 
— “not ready,” says Rabat. 

Majestic International, which previously had some top- 
of-the-line TV combos, showed a 23-in. German Grundig- 
made consolette and a TV-stereo-AM-FM-SW combination 
at the lowest prices of any German TV sets it has offered 
so far — but they’re still high-end items at $475 & $595 lists. 

The sets have some unique features: Photocell control 
which automatically adjusts picture brightness to room 
lighting, similar to the new Magnavox feature (see p. 22); 
a signal-seeking push-bar channel selector, which auto- 
matically stops only at channels with pictures, while a 
traveling light indicates which channel is tuned in; all con- 
trols concealed under hinged panel. iLike the Delmonico 
sets, the Grundig TVs use U.S.-installed picture tubes. 
Sonic remote control (volume, channel, brightness) is 
available to the dealer at $40 extra, adds $75 to the list. 

The German-American Metz TV-stereo hybrid, which 
made its debut about a year ago (Vol. 16:2 p20), was again 
represented in Chicago last week, after a highly successful 
year. This time, two 23-in. combos were shown — incorpor- 
ating German-made stereo-radio combinations & U.S.-made 
TV chassis. It’s understood Philco chassis are now used. 

In radio imports, Delmonico appeared to be assuming 
a far stronger position, having taken over the Japan Victor 
radio line (it previously had the TV franchise only) from 
Petely Enterprises. Japan Victor, incidentally, is wholly 
owned by Matsushita, whose imports are handled by Mat- 
sushita of America. 

On the surface, it would appear that the tide has 
turned away from Japanese-made transistor radios as a 
result of: (1) Lowered prices & improved quality of U.S. 



products. (2) Japanese govt, quotas on radio exports to 
U.S. & Canada. (3) Near-record demand for & sales of 
radios in U.S. Nevertheless, most American set makers 
were still gloomy about the whole situation, pointing to the 
huge transistor surplus in Japan and predicting widespread 
cut-price dumps of Japanese goods. 

Certainly the Japanese competition has made Amer- 
ican radio manufacturers explore new markets and stretch 
their ingenuity to the fullest. Admiral, for example, has 
expanded its distribution to jewelry & specialty chains, dis- 
tributing directly to them. Admiral’s Ross Siragusa Jr. 
estimates that such direct sales now account for 10-to-12% 
of his company’s radio business. Such markets as jewelry 
stores were originally opened up to radio business by 
Japanese radios. 



Japanese competition is cutting into British electronics 
exports to the U.S., Commerce Dept, figures for first-half 
1960 indicate. The Dept.’s Business & Defense Services 
Administration reported that last year’s first-half U.R. 
electronic product exports to the U.S. totaled $9.1 million, 
down from $9.4 million in the same 1959 period. The de- 
clines were in consumer products & tubes, partially offset 
by increases in communications, navigation & radar equip- 
ment. Six-month shipments of record-playing mechanisms 
were down 20% to $3.6 million from $4.5 million in the 
1959 period (423,900 units vs. 492,700 units); phono parts 
& accessories, down 58% to $345,000 from $830,000; radio 
receivers, down 18% to $119,000 from $146,000 (5,100 vs. 
4,800 units); speakers & microphones, down 11% to $275,- 
000 from $310,000 (49,000 vs. 60,800 units); tubes & trans- 
istors, down 15% to $966,000 from $1,260,000 (1,667,800 
vs. 2,553,200). 

Remote control is “best single sales feature” in TV, 
according to Mart magazine’s annual dealer survey, re- 
ported in the January issue. Digesting responses of 176 
appliance & TV dealers, Mart found that remote control 
jumped to first place as “best sales feature,” 17 dealers 
selecting it. “No printed circuits,” dropped from first place 
in last year’s survey to 2nd this year, with 15 votes. 
Others, in order: Service free or reliable, 12 votes; quality 
construction, 11; furniture styling, 9. Other TV-stereo 
highlights of the survey: (1) Stereo was listed as 2nd 
most profitable item in 1960, with 20% of dealers selecting 
it as No. 1 (automatic washers were first, chosen by 26%). 
TV was 3rd, selected by 15%. (2) The majority of dealers 
(126) don’t plan to change the number of TV brands they 
handle in 1961. Of the remainder, 27 will decrease, 10 
will increase brands, and the rest either didn’t answer or 
replied that they don’t handle TV. 

Finance 

Electronics Capital Corp., the small-business invest- 
ment company, expects its earnings to total between $160,- 
000 & $170,000 (9 4 a share) for the year ending next June 
30, Pres. Charles Salik told the Los Angeles Society of 
Security Analysts last week. He predicted gross income of 
about $1 million. For the last fiscal year, gross was $892,- 
580, earnings $145,334 (8<f on each of its 1.8 million shares). 
Said Salik: “Earnings are the least of our objectives. Cap- 
ital gains are our primary objective — we want to see these 
companies we’ve invested in grow so our investors’ money 
will grow with them.” To date, Electronics Capital has 
invested $7 million and committed $3 million more to 15 
electronics companies. 



24 



JANUARY 16, 1961 



Financial Reports of TV-Electronics Companies 

These are latest reports as obtained during the last week. Dash indicates the information was not available at press time. Parentheses denote loss. 



Company 


Period 


AT&T 


I960 — year to Nov. 30 

1959 — year to Nov. 30 

1960 — qtr. to Nov. 30 
1959 — qtr. to Nov. 30 


General Instrument 1 


1960 — 9 mo. to Nov. 30 

1959 — 9 mo. to Nov. 30 

1960 — qtr. to Nov. 30 
1959 — qtr. to Nov. 30 


Itek 3 


1960 — year to Sept. 30 
1959 — year to Sept. 30 


Magnavox 

Story below. 


1960 — year to Dec. 31 

1959 — year to Dec. 31 

1960 — qtr. to Dec. 31 
1959 — qtr. to Dec. 31 


MGM 


1960 — 12 wks. to Nov. 26 
1959 — 12 wks. to Nov. 26 


Muntz TV 

Story below. 


1960 — qtr. to Nov. 30 
1959 — qtr. to Nov. 30 


Pacific Industries 


1960 — qtr. to Nov. 30 
1959 — qtr. to Nov. 30 


Stanley Warner 9 


1960 — 13 wks. to Nov. 26 
1959 — 13 wks. to Nov. 26 


Storer Bcstg. 


1960—10 mo. to Oct. 31 s 
1959—10 mo. to Oct. 31 


Walt Disney 
Productions 8 


1960 — year to Oct. 1 
1959 — year to Oct. 3 


Webcor 


1960 — qtr. to Sept. 30 
1959 — qtr. to Sept. 30 



Sales 


Pre-Tax 

Earnings 


Net Earnings 


Per 

Common 

Share 


Common 

Shares 


$7,880,384,000 




1,205,954,000 


$5.52 


218,491,000 


7,351,310,000 




1,100,781,000 


5.16 


213,144,000 


2,009,775,000 




312,155,000 


1.40 


223,454,000 


1,876,587,000 




284,575,000 


1.33 


214,393,000 


53,213,971- 


$ 4,826,158 


2,431,558 


1.01 


2,415,523 


49,115,212 


4,017,315 


1,888,755 


.88 


2,147,980 


19,851,137 J 


2,248,457 


1,123,023 


.47 


2,415,523 


18,800,500 


1,985,870 


926,645 


.43 


2,147,980 


35,053,837 




886,337 


.81 




28,886,836 




679,174 


.65 




124,500,000= 




6,500,000 s 


2.75 


2,360,000 


107,758,000 




4,679,458 


1.99 


2,360,000 


44,600,000= 




2,966,000 s 


1.25 


2,360,000 


35,000,000 




2,295,000 


.98 


2,360,000 


30,902,000 


4,902,000 


2,177,000 


.87 


2,506,129 


27,633,000 


4,352,000 


1,852,000 


.71 


2,608,888 


2,688,500 




298,261 


.25* 


1,175,876 


3,088,864 




378,668 


.32 4 


1,165,376 


4,374,023 




431,663 


.30 


1,415,354 


4,490,718 




93,221 


.08 


1,145,354 


33,351,153 


2,670,615 


1,470,615 


.73 


2,025,374 


32,366,397 


2,540,448 


1,210,448 


.60 


2,025,374 


24,874,884 


8,294,814 


4,104,879 


1.66 


2,474,750 


22,723,228 




4,156,453 


1.68 


2,474,750 


46,409,572 


(2,642,037) 7 


(1,342,037) 8 




1,626,023 


58,432,399 


7,300,228 


3,400,228 


2.15 


1,581,011 


6,888,000 




137,000 






8,783,000 




135,000 







Notes: including merged General Transistor on a pro-forma, pooling- Park. 7 After $6-million write-down of inventory (Vol. 16:49 p24). 

of-interest basis. -Record, including merged Hermes Electronics. «After $1. 3-million tax credit, including WAST Albany. 

4 After preferred dividends. 6 From SEC report, including Disneyland 



Magnavox sales & earnings rose to record levels in both 
the final quarter & the full year 1960 (see financial table). 
For the year, profits rose 40% on a 15.5% sales gain. In 
the December quarter, sales climbed 28% & earnings 
increased to $3 million from the $2.3 million of the year 
before. “The sizable sales increase,” explained Pres. Frank 
Freimann, “is largely attributable to the company’s mili- 
tary & industrial products div., where sales for the last 
quarter were approximately double those of last year.” 
TV & stereo sales produced a “modest” gain over 1959. 

Collins Radio anticipates a 20% profit decline in its 
1961 fiscal year ending July 31. The company had pre- 
viously forecast gains of up to 10%. Exec, vp R. S. Gates 
attributed the downbeat estimate to increases in R&D 
outlays, and the failure of an anticipated 20% increase in 
non-military business to materialize. 

Muntz TV, which experienced a 17% sales drop in the 
first quarter of its 1961 fiscal (see financial table), expects 
the total year (ending Aug. 31) to about equal the $860,451 
(74(1 a share) profit on $9.8-million sales produced in fiscal 
1960. Secy.-treas. Daniel J. Domin looks for a 2nd-half 
recovery to wipe out the first-half lag. Pres. Wallace Keil 
reports that Muntz hopes to introduce a 27-in. TV this year. 



Common Stock Dividends Stk. of 

Corporation Period Amt. Payable Record 

Allied Radio Q $0.08 Feb. 28 Feb. 14 

Howard W. Sams .... Q .15 Jan. 25 Jan. 10 

Wurlitzer Q .20 Mar. 1 Feb. 10 



OVER-THE-COUNTER 
COMMON STOCK QUOTATIONS 

Thursday, January 12, 1961 



Stock 


Bid Asked 


Stock 


Bid Asked 


Acoustica Associates _ 


18% 


20% 


Magna Theater . 


3 


3% 


Aerovox 


8% 


9% 


Magnetics Inc. 


7% 


8% 


Allied Radio 


22% 


24% 


Maxson tW.L.) 


10% 


11% 


Astron Corp. _ 


1% 


2% 


Meredith Pub. 


42% 


45% 


Baird Atomic _ 


23 


24% 


Metropolitan Bcstg. 


20% 


22% 


CGS Labs 


8% 


9% 


Milgo Electronics 


20 


21% 


Cetron Electric 


5% 


6% 


Narda Microwave 


5% 


6 


Control Data Corp. 


63% 


66% 


Nuclear of Chicago 


37% 


40% 


Cook Elec. _ 


12% 


13% 


Official Films 


2% : 


-1/16 


Craig Systems 


14% 


16 


Pacific Automation 


4% 


5% 


Dictaphone _ 


34 


36% 


Pacific Mercury 


7 


7% 


Digitronics 


22% 


24% 


Philips Lamp 


149% 


155% 


Eastern Ind. 


14%, 


16% 


Pyramid Electric 


2% 


3 '/a 


Bitel-McCullough 


17% 


18% 


Radiation Inc. 


27 


29% 


Elco Corp. _ 


13% 


15 Va 


Howard W. Sams 


40% 


43% 


Electro Instruments __ 


24% 


27 % 


Sanders Associates 


38 


41% 


Electro Voice _ 


8% 


8% 


Silicon Transistor 


4% 


5% 


Electronic Associates _ 


2814 


30% 


Soroban Engineering _ 


45 


48% 


Erie Resistor 


10% 


11% 


Soundscriber _ 


15% 


16% 


Executone 


20 


22 


Speer Carbon _ - 


18% 


20% 


Farrington Mfg. . — 


27 


29% 


Sprague Electric 


54 


57% 


FXR _ 


36 


39% 


Sterling TV . 


1% 


2 


General Devices _ 


11 


12 


Taft Bcstg. 


12% 


13% 


G-L Electronics 


10 


11% 


Taylor Instrument 


37 


40% 


Granco Products - 


3 


3% 


Technology Inst. 


7% 


8% 


Gross Telecasting — 


20% 


22% 


Telechrome 


12% 


13% 


Hallicrafters _ 


34 >4 


36% 


Telecomputing _ 


7% 


8% 




1 16 


% 


Time Inc. _ _ _ 


83 


87% 


Hewlett-Packard — 


27% 


29% 


Tracerlab 


9% 


10% 


High Voltage Eng. — 


168 


180 


United Artists 


5% 


6% 


Infrared Industries — 


15% 


17 


United Control 


16 y« 


18 


Interstate Engineering 


22% 


24% 


Universal Trans. 


% 


1% 


Itek — 


51% 


56 


Vitro 


11 % 


12% 


Jerrold _ - _ — 


7% 


87a 


Vocaline 


2% 3-3/16 


Lab for Electronics — 


46% 


49% 


Wells-Gardner 


23 


24% 


Lei Inc. 


5% 


6 


Wometco Ent. 


13 


14% 




WEEKLY 



JAN 83 190 

Television Di&rest 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



© 1961 TRIANGLE PUBLICATION, 



The authoritative service for executives in all branches of the television arts & industries 



LICATIONS^INCf 






VOL. 17: No. 4 



SUMMARY-INDEX OF WEEK'S NEWS 



WITH THIS ISSUE: 



Index to 1960 Television Digest Newsletters & Special Re- 
ports, key to year's TV news, superseding quarterly Indexes. 



FCC 

STATIONS BLAST PROPOSED TRANSFER RULES. They call the 
3-year-minimum unfair, unnecessary, time-wasting, etc. (p. 1). 

Auxiliary Services 

FCC, NEAR FINAL GREEN LIGHT for pay-TV test, instructs staff to 
draft decision. But no start in Hartford until next year (p. 2). 
CATV AT RTES provides lively luncheon workshop session, with 
divergent views presented on CATV's industry role (p. 4). 

Stations 

FM NEW STARTERS STILL OUTNUMBER AMs rising 80 in 6 
months while AM increased 63. On-air totals Jan. 1: FM, 821, AM, 
3,547 (p. 2). 

U. S. & CANADIAN OUTLETS START: KIFI-TV (Ch. 8) Idaho Falls, 
Ida. began Jan. 23 with NBC-TV and CFCF-TV (Ch. 12) Montreal, 
Que. began Jan. 20 as an English-language independent (p. 6). 
CANADA'S SET PENETRATION rose to 85% of homes last fall, 
and total TV households to 3,793,400, reports BBM (p. 6). 

Advertising 

JWT PITCH TO FORD for the 1957-58 season — hitherto a close 
secret — is unveiled to N.Y. RTES audience by the Thompson 
agency — with Ford's permission (p. 2). 

Programming 

PRODUCT BOYCOTT AGAINST SPONSORS of "The Untouchables" 
is threatened by N.Y. Congressman Alfred E. Santangelo unless 
ABC calls off its "stereotyping" of Italians (p. 7). 



Consumer Electronics 

MARKETING "THE WORLD OVER" is Philco specialty under 
Philco International Pres. Harvey Williams. Philosophy behind its 
$100-million overseas appliance-TV busness (pp. 14 & 17). 

6-FT. WALL TV proposed for each of 900 Chicago apartment units 
by TelePrompTer. It would employ rear-screen projection & new 
Dalto projectors (p. 16). 

NARDA — 'SNOWBALL' & NIPPON: Coming's TV promotion is 
endorsed at the dealers' Chicago convention. Keynoter, Admiral 
Pres. Ross Siragusa, raps competition from "cheap-labor" coun- 
tries (p. 16). 

MORE EMPHASIS ON MONO shown in November retail phono 
figures, as stereo dips to 60% of unit sales. Total phono sales 
■for month are down 18% from year before (p. 18). 

Film <S Tape 

"RED" MOVE ON MOVIES & TV seen by House Un-American 
Activities Committee Chmn. Walter (D-Pa.), who protests rehiring 
of studios of once-blacklisted employes (p. 8). 

Technology 

PORTABLE TV PROJECTOR, to retail at $1,950, is demonstrated 
by N.J. flight-simulator firm. TPT buys first 10 units (p. 12). 

IRE CONVENTION to be highlighted by panel on new energy 
sources. Session to hear paper on new video recorder (p. 13). 

Other Departments 

FOREIGN (p. 5). FCC (p. 10). ETV (p. 10). CONGRESS (p. 11). 
NETWORKS (p. 11). PERSONALS (p. 12). FINANCE (p. 19). 



STATIONS BLAST PROPOSED TRANSFER RULES: FCC's proposed rules to tighten 

station sales (Vol. 16:50 pi), which would require hearings on sales of properties that are held less than 3 
years (with certain exceptions), were roundly lambasted in several dozen comments filed last week. 
Opponents marshalled long list of arguments, including: 

(1) Congress never intended to make licensees hold stations any minimum period. 

(2) FCC has plenty of power now to curb abuses. 

(3) Prospective investors will be driven a way. 

(4) Station employe morale would suffer during long periods of uncertainty pending decisions 
after hearings. 

(5) Hearings will swamp FCC — with 3-year periods passing while transfer applicants are waiting 
for hearings & decisions — making whole process both moot & ludicrous. 

(6) It's unfair to make 3-year periods applicable after grants of "major changes" of facilities — 
penalizing veteran broadcasters just because they've improved their properties. 



2 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



(7) No other industries using public facilities have such restrictions. 

Westinghouse Bcstg. Co. was a partial dissenter. It approved the proposed changes except for 3- 
year restriction on sales following grants of major facilities changes. 

FCC NEAR FINAL PAY-TV TEST GREEN LIGHT: To no one's surprise, FCC has taken 

the penultimate step toward approving the RKO-Zenith Hartford pay-TV test. Following usual practice in 
such matters, it announced that it had instructed its staff to draft a decision giving the project its go-ahead. 

It will take the staff a month or so to work up the necessary words for a final vote affirming last 
week's preliminary vote. FCC said it planned to approve the test "under specified conditions" — and it's 
understood that these will follow those recommended by the Broadcast Bureau (Vol. 16:49 p2). They're 
designed to enable the Commission to keep close tabs on the experiment. 

After final approval, it's assumed that exhibitor opponents will exhaust all further procedures at 
FCC, then go to court. This should take 6 months or so. Then, RKO-Zenith has said, it will need 6 months to 
get started. So, don't look for actual operations in Hartford for about a year. 

Meanwhile, other pay-TV hopefuls may be encouraged to apply to test other systems in other cities 
— and RKO-Zenith might ask FCC to change the ground rules to permit it to test in additional cities. It is 
now limited to one. 

FM NEW STARTERS STILL OUTNUMBER AMs: Trend in AM & FM station growth 

continues as it has for the last year or two. Both AM & FM are in strong demand, but clogged AM pipelines at 
FCC permit FM to outstrip the older service in terms of new starts. Our figures as of Jan. 1, as reflected in our 
new Radio Directory, now in hands of printer, show that operating FMs total 821, up 80 in 6 months, while AMs 
total 3,547, up 63 in same period. 

Applications for new FMs stand at 105, for AMs at 794 . Applications for improved AM facilities total 
807. Herewith are AM & FM totals at close of each year since end of World War II: 



Year 


AM 

Licenses & CPs 


On Air 


Year 


FM 

Licenses & CPs 


On Air 


1945 


1056 


913 


1945 


288 


48 


1946 


1579 


1027 


1946 


684 


140 


1947 


1961 


1586 


1947 


1010 


374 


1948 


2131 


1877 


1948 


976 


687 


1949 


2246 


2045 


1949 


791 


728 


1950 


2351 


2199 


1950 


706 


672 


1951 


2410 


2306 


1951 


654 


640 


1952 


2516 


2377 


1952 


648 


612 


1953 


2644 


2451 


1953 


602 


550 


1954 


2782 


2662 


1954 


583 


549 


1955 


2941 


2814 


1955 


557 


536 


1956 


3140 


3024 


1956 


559 


528 


1957 


3289 


3180 


1957 


588 


537 


1958 


3423 


3318 


1958 


686 


571 


1959 


3527 


3456 


1959 


839 


677 


1960 


3667 


3547 


1960 


1018 


821 



Advertising 

JWT’S PITCH TO FORD: When an ad agency makes a 
presentation of a multi-million, multi-program TV cam- 
paign to a client, the “pitch” is usually a closely held 
secret and remains so. But just such a presentation 
became public industry knowledge last week in N.Y. 
when J. Walter Thompson TV-radio program vp Rob- 
ert E. (“Bucky”) Buchanan took the wraps off a JWT 



presentation covering Ford Motor Co. broadcast activ- 
ity for the 1957-58 season. “Ford,” Buchanan told a 
Jan. 17 RTES luncheon meeting, “has given JWT per- 
mission to share with you our actual presentation,” 
since it was recent enough to have industry interest but 
not recent enough to tip Ford’s hand to competitors. 

“Broadcast media can be properly used only if you 
know ahead of time exactly what you want to accomplish, 
whom you want to reach, how often and — the heart of the 



VOL. 17: No. 4 



3 



matter — what you want to do with your specific commer- 
cial message,” Buchanan said. As presented originally 
by JWT (80 pages of text, 43 visual exhibits), the gist of 
the presentation was this: 

In general, the TV-radio lineup had to (1) be “com- 
patible with the Ford div. image,” (2) have evening time 
periods “between 8 & 11 o’clock,” (3) be in a good network 
slot in terms of competition & discount, (4) have a cover- 
age factor of 95%, (5) provide “9 minutes (of commer- 
cials) per week, reaching 85% of TV homes in a 4-week 
period,” (6) attract a “40% per program” share of audi- 
ence, (7) offer a cost efficiency “better than the average,” 
(8) and be flexible enough in format to be improved. 

Specifically, JWT recommended 4 shows — Tennessee 
Ernie Ford, Zane Grey Theater, Suspicion and a series of 
Desi-Lucy 60-min. specials. 

1. Tennessee Ernie, JWT felt, was a good buy because 
of his “strength in rural, older age groups,” a “favorable 
cpm,” the flexible opportunities for personal salesmanship 
by Ernie, his “popularity with dealers,” the obvious Ford 
sponsor identification, and because “by pure coincidence 
he would obviously never work for Plymouth or Chevrolet.” 

2. Four Star’s Zane Grey Theater, as JWT saw it, had 
“appeal to younger families,” provided a good contrast to 
Ernie, had a “greater unduplicated audience” measured 
against the first recommendation, offered the “personal 
salesmanship of host Dick Powell,” and was liked by 
dealers and the public. 

3. Suspicion was, again, a strong contrast to the other 
2 shows, had a later time period & an attractive price. 
Further: “Drama, particularly suspense drama, has a high 
appeal for upper-income brackets.” 

4. A final contrast to the above 3 shows was offered, 
JWT proposed, by the Desi-Lucy specials, and gave Ford 
something with which “to combat the effect of 52 Chev- 
rolet hours” each year via Dinah Shore. The specials also 
offered various merchandising opportunities & the services 
of the show’s stars as “personal salesmen.” 

Car Radio Listening Complements TV Viewing 

The TV efforts should be backstopped, JWT said to 
Ford, with some choice radio buys: A capsule (5-min.) 
series with Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney, a morn- 
ing news show, an afternoon Arthur Godfrey Show, and 
an evening newscast with Edward R. Murrow. The “2 
media will complement each other,” said JWT, enabling 
Ford to reach “the man in his car across the nation.” 

Did the Ford recipe bake up into a successful TV-radio 
cake? “Yes,” JWT’s Buchanan told the RTES group. “It 
was highly successful. Estimates on our TV shares came 
out so close I was surprised.” 

Ford, as a TV client in action, is “no better and no 
worse than any other,” Buchanan said. “We have told 
Ford that mother-in-law surveys are strictly out.’ We 
hold no brief for a client who suddenly becomes an artistic 
genius, but within limits we will go along with changes.” 

One notable change made in the JWT-recommended 
shows in the 1957-58 season: Tennessee Ernie Ford had 
developed as a folksy, cornpone type in daytime TV. How- 
ever, when the show shifted to a nighttime spot for Ford, 
the producer chose to have Ernie appear on the opening 
show in white tie & tails, backed by a choral group in 
formal black robes and low-key, arty lighting. It was 
near-disaster. The sponsor complained loudly to the 
agency, which agreed heartily, and had a series of produc- 
tion conferences with the show’s producer. Result: Back 
to corn went the show, up went ratings. 



Beer & ale rules for Canadian TV & radio stations 
would be liberalized under a proposal announced last week 
by the Board of Broadcast Governors — but they still would 
not permit the TV display of brew, bottle or carton. The 
TV l-egulations would permit the naming of the brewery & 
its products and visual display of the label. Radio rules 
would allow mention of brewery & products. Current reg- 
ulations permit mention of names of products only. BBG 
has scheduled public hearings Feb. 22 for the new rules, 
which would apply only in the 3 provinces where advertis- 
ing of alcoholic beverages is permitted— Ontario, Quebec 
& Newfoundland. 

TV quaffed major portion of the brewing industry’s 
1960 ad budget of $169,650,000, reports Jan. 20 Printers’ 
Ink. Runner-up media : outdoor, radio, newspapers, maga- 
zines. Spot accounted for the lion’s share of the TV. 

James M. Landis, President-elect Kennedy’s advisor 
on regulatory agencies (Vol. 17:2 p2), will be the main- 
session lead-off speaker at the 3rd annual mid-winter 
Washington conference of the Advertising Federation of 
America Feb. 1 in the Statler-Hilton Hotel. Other speakers 
will include Rep. Boggs (D-La.), discussing “Censorship 
by Taxation,” and Rep. Wilson (R-Cal.), giving his views 
on the ad industry. A special luncheon guest will be Com- 
merce Secy. -designate Luther H. Hodges. A reception for 
members of Congress & officials of the Kennedy adminis- 
tration will close the conference. 

Agency entry into film production for the 1961-62 sea- 
son is via a McCann-Erickson-Desilu Productions series- 
to-be, Counter-Intelligence Corps (Vol. 17:3 plO). The 
co-production venture is the “first between a major pro- 
ducer & an agency” and includes a 2-part pilot (shooting of 
which begins Feb. 1) and 12 additional 60-min. episodes. 
The agreement covers foreign distribution rights to the 
2-parter as a future theatrical film release. 



Ad People: Edward L. Bond named exec, vp-gen. mgr., 

Young & Rubicam . . Alfred S. Moss, ex-Don Kemper & 
Co., joins Kastor Hilton Chesley Clifford & Atherton as a 
senior vp . . . Robert Keith Gray, secy, of President Eisen- 
hower’s cabinet, elected a vp of Hill & Knowlton & dir. of 
the Washington office . . . Carleton L. Spier, vp, dir. & 
copy supervisor, retires after 43 years with BBDO & its 
predecessor agency. 

Jerome R. Feniger promoted from TV-radio program- 
ming vp, Cunningham & Walsh, to TV vp for TV dept, 
programming operations, account service & business affairs 
. . . Dr. Carl H. Rush named vp-research dir., Ted Bates . . . 
Greene Fenley III named a Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample vp 
. . . Ralph W. Nicholson, vp & mgr., Fuller & Smith & Ross, 
appointed U.S. Asst. Postmaster General . . . Nat Kameny, 
Kameny Associates, elected pres., League of Advertising 
Agencies, succeeding Alfred Siesel, H. J. Siesel Co. 



U.S. Station Rate Increases 



Stations 

KABC-TV Los Angeles 

WTAE Pittsburgh 

WTCN-TV Minneapolis 

WLWC Columbus, O 

KM J -TV Fresno 

KDAL-TV Duluth 

WSTV-TV Steubenville, O... 

KPHO-TV Phoenix 

KVIP-TV Redding, Cal. 



Base Hour 


Minute 


Date 


$3500 (no change) 


$900 to $1000 


Jan. 1 


1800 (no change) 


500 to 650 


Jan. 1 


1200 to $1600 


340 (no change) 


Jan. 1 


1100 to 


1150 


250 (no change) 


Jan. 1 


700 (no change) 


190 to 200 


Dec. 1 


550 to 


660 


125 to 150 


Jan. 1 


550 to 


600 


140 (no change) 


Jan. 1 


450 to 


500 


100 (no change) 


i 


250 to 


275 


55 to 70 


Jan. 1 



iNot reported. 



4 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



Auxiliary Services 

CATV SESSION AT RTES: The “co-existence problem” 
between CATV operators & licensed-station broad- 
casters is still a problem — and likely to remain so until 
there’s a clear-cut set of industry or govt, (or both) 
rules covering community antennas. That was the im- 
pression, if not the immediate intent, of an RTES 
workshop luncheon meeting in N.Y. Jan 18 which 
bravely tackled the question of CATV’s relationship to 
the broadcast industry. 

On hand to state their viewpoints, and to answer floor 
questions, was a guest panel including: William Dalton, 
new pres, of National CATV Associates Inc.; Mrs. Dorothy 
Mugford, promotion mgr. & CATV liaison for WNEP-TV 
Scranton-Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; NAB TV vp Charles Tower; 
and Milton J. Shapp, pres, of Jerrold Electronics Corp. 
Moderator for the session was Sol Cornberg, pres, of Sol 
Cornberg Associates and chmn. of the RTES workshop. 

Reflecting opinions held by many broadcasters, Tower 
stated that “CATV is a limited type of pay TV supported 
by people who subscribe . . . and by the advertisers & 
broadcasters of the TV industry who provide a no-cost 
source of raw material. CATV systems perform a useful 
service. They have to because the American public is 
sensitive to a gyp operation.” 

"Free TV Is Primary Service” 

Problems between CATV operators & broadcasters, 
Tower said, have come “from relatively few situations 
where CATV people have refused to make relatively few 
concessions to reconcile interests involved. Were they more 
farsighted, we wouldn’t have the problems we have today 
. . . CATV interests must recognize that free TV is the 
primary service, not only because it serves the overwhelm- 
ing majority of Americans, but also because it provides the 
free product which makes CATV possible.” 

It is “essential,” said Tower, to have legislation recog- 
nizing “that CATV systems, if not a part of the nation- 
wide allocations program, have at least a substantial im- 
pact upon it.” FCC, Tower added, should be given author- 
ity “to control, where necessary, the relationship between 
free TV & existing CATV and also to control the possible 
future development of CATV.” 

In his first public appearance as a CATV spokesman, 
Dalton had, prior to Tower, stuck closely to the every- 
thing’s just-dandy point of view. “CATV,” he said, “is 
not a competitor . . . not the broadcaster’s boogie man . . . 
not the advertiser’s, or the ad agency’s, enigma ... not the 
forerunner of pay TV. CATV is nothing more than a mas- 
ter antenna service.” 

Not a single one of the common criticisms of CATV — 
ranging from claims that CATV blocks new TV stations 
to its role as “a young monster” — are factual, Dalton 
said. He noted that the TV industry itself is frequently 
under attack from outside. Without mentioning Kennedy 
aide James M. Landis by name, Dalton made a fairly 
obvious reference to Landis’ recently-stated (Vol. 17:3 p3) 
views, saying, “There are some who believe that govern- 
ment should step in & produce TV shows, thereby improv- 
ing facilities, providing more employment, introducing 
more competition.” 

A middle-of-the-road stance was taken by the panel’s 
lady guest, Mrs Mugford. A CATV operation can become 
“an integral part” of a station’s community service, she 
indicated, and can even contribute to the station’s public- 



affairs activities. “CATV must never . . . restrict the 
growth of local stations. This is not only unfair to the 
broadcaster, but to CATV subscribers,” she warned. 

With this opinion spectrum from which to choose, it 
was only natural that audience questions would reflect 
even sharper divergence — and so they did. Samples: Q: 
“Who makes the choice of what stations will be fed to a 
CATV system if you have a multiple choice?” A: (from 
Mrs. Mugford) “Where there’s a choice, it’s usually the 
stations with the strongest signals, although generally a 
system tries to cover all 3 networks.” Q: “CATV services 
put the stress on network shows. Why don’t they carry 
full schedules of local shows?” A: (from NCTA’s Dalton) 
“I believe CATV operators are more conscious of their 
responsibilities than ever before.” Q: “Boosters seem to 
be the answer, not CATVs. Would you agree to non-dupli- 
cation (of programming from different sources) to prevent 
an economic bind for new local stations?” A: (from Jer- 
rold’s Shapp) “Only 3 out of the 100 stations that have 
gone on & off the air since 1952 have claimed that CATV 
was a direct cause. CATV works on the law of economics.” 
Q : “What about CATV’s originating pay-TV programming, 
such as the Patterson-Johansson fight?” A: (from Chmn. 
Cornberg) “Ladies & gentlemen, I believe our time today 
is about up . . .” 



Newhart Draws 30% for Telemeter: Bob Newhart’s live 

pay-TV show in Toronto earlier this month (Vol. 17:2 p9) 
attracted just under 30% of the 6,000 Telemeter homes in 
the area for the original & repeat showings. So estimated 
Telemeter in N.Y. last week on the basis of tapes from pay- 
TV units processed so far (11%). By all evidence, there’s 
no profit at all for Telemeter in the deal, which the Para- 
mount subsidiary considers experimental. Program charge 
for the Newhart show was $1.25, which would mean a gross 
(before operational and collection charges) of about $2,000. 
Newhart’s usual nightclub fee is about $10,000. 

Toronto viewers, and nearly all U.S. TV homes, had a 
chance, following Newhart’s pay-TV venture, to watch him 
do his “submarine” monologue on the Ed Sullivan Show 
for free. And on Jan. 20, N.Y. viewers could catch his 
“Abe Lincoln” monologue in a guest shot on Playboy's 
Penthouse. He was also planning other TV appearances, 
it was reported. 

We discussed the Newhart pay-TV show last week with 
a spokesman for comedian Dick Shawn, who has a night- 
club act (and a nightclub price) not unlike Newhart’s. 
Shawn believes that night club comics should never perform 
their bistro act — their real stock in trade — on TV, and has 
turned down everything from standing offers from Perry 
Como and Ed Sullivan to pay-TV nibbles. He isn’t averse 
to TV — but only in a straight dramatic role. 



Formerly-illegal vhf booster operators have been given 
2 months’ grace by the FCC, which extended from Feb. 1 
to April 1 the deadline by which they must file applications 
for translators complying with new Commission rules. The 
reason, FCC said, was “the present limited availability of 
type-accepted vhf translator equipment.” It announced 
that only one had FCC approval: Type No. HRV, made by 
Electronics Missiles & Communications Inc. However, 
before the week was out, 2 more had been accepted: 
RX-17B by Mid-American Relay System, and T-l by Benco 
TV Associates Ltd. No more applications are pending 
although several manufacturers, including Adler, have 
announced plans to make them. 



VOL. 17: No. 4 



5 



No Pay TV Now for Soo: That proposed “Charge-A- 

Vision” wired pay-TV system for Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 
(Vol. 16:41 p9) is definitely not in the cards — at least for 
the time being. A merger of 2 firms planning to wire up 
that Canadian city (one of them including the Charge- A- 
Vision principals) will result in a deluxe CATV system 
with programs from the 3 U.S. networks piped across inter- 
national border, in addition to signals from local CJIC-TV. 

The system, however, will have a total capacity of 9 
channels — meaning 5 to spare — and the officials of the firm 
announced that it “will be capable of carrying local orig- 
inations & movies as & when required.” Added T. A. Cross, 
Pres, of Rediffusion Inc., in answer to our specific question: 
“The system is flexible so pay TV can be added later.” 

The new firm will be controlled by Rediffusion Inc., 
Canadian affiliate of big British-operated Rediffusion Ltd., 
which runs a 16,000-subscriber CATV system in Montreal. 
A large minority interest will be held by Superior Com- 
munity TV Ltd., which also had been planning a Sault Ste. 
Marie CATV system and includes principals of the pro- 
posed Charge- A-Vision project. 

Believed to be the first CATV system to pipe programs 
across the Canadian-U.S. border by cable, Rediffusion- 
Superior TV Ltd. (as the firm probably will be called) will 
pick up network programs from “a common carrier system 
already existing in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.,” just across the 
border — presumably the carrier which supplies signals to 
the CATV in the Michigan city (Soo Cable TV Inc.). 

Cross said installation of 150 miles of cables in Sault 
Ste. Marie and the townships of Korah & Tarentorous will 
begin by March 15, with service due to start June 1. He 
estimated a potential of 5,000 subscribers. The firm’s office 
will be at 169 East St., Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 

■ 

Jerrold has petitioned U.S. Supreme Court to reverse 
last July’s District Court anti-trust ruling which bars it 
from acquiring CATV systems without Court permission 
before April 2, 1962 and forbids it from tying in exclusive 
servicing or purchasing contracts with its sales of equip- 
ment (Vol. 16:31 p8). Jerrold argued in its appeal that it 
is a small company competing with giants and asked 
whether it can legally be barred from buying CATV sys- 
tems, since these systems “consume, rather than re-sell” 
Jerrold’s products. 

Jerrold sales of CATV equipment will climb to a record 
of more than $3.3 million in the 1961 fiscal year ending 
Feb. 28, reports community-sales div. mgr. Lee Zemnick. 
Sales & installations are running at a rate 50% higher 
than a year ago. He says Jerrold-built systems installed 
this year have brought multi-channel TV to more than 
250,000 viewers in 12 states. 

Systems Management Inc., Daniels Bldg., 2930 E. 3rd 
Ave., Denver, has been established by CATV broker Bill 
Daniels to aid newcomers in the management of CATV sys- 
tems. Pres, of the new organization is Carl Williams, who 
is a partner with Daniels in the brokerage. The firm pro- 
vides overall management, engineering, accounting, public 
relations, promotion, etc. 

Closed-circuit color-TV system will be installed in the 
Air Force’s Pentagon hq by Foto-Video Electronics Inc., 
Cedar Grove, N.J., supplementing a system now in opera- 
tion in the Joint Chiefs of Staff war board room. The Air 
Force installation will include a studio & control room and 
12 rooms outside the main area with color monitors. 



Fayetteville, Ark. CATV system plus radio KHOG and 
a Muzak franchise, in which Sen. Fulbright (D-Ark.) & 
his family held an interest, have been sold to Southwest- 
ern Trans-Video Corp., headed by C. A. Sammons of Dal- 
las — price not disclosed, negotiated by Daniels & Asso- 
ciates. The CATV system has 3,800 subscribers. Fred J. 
Stevenson, who continues as mgr., at the same time pur- 
chased the Rogers, Ark. system which has approximately 
1,000 subscribers. Sammons now controls 14 systems serv- 
ing 16 communities with a total of 40,000 connections, and 
said to be the largest holdings in the industry. 

Uhf translator grants: Ch. 72, Mason Tex., to Fort 
Mason Translator System. Ch. 71, Fish Lake Valley, Nev., 
to Esmeralda County TV district. Ch. 80, The Dalles, Ore. & 
Goldendale, Wash., to Mid-Columbia Community TV Corp. 
Ch. 73, 75 & 83, Wellington & Dodson, Tex., to Greenbelt 
TV Translator System Inc. Ch. 70 & 74, Grand Marais, 
Minn., to Grand Marais Lions Club. 

On-channel uhf boosters whose power is limited to one 
watt could be operated by uhf translator licensees under 
an amended rule proposed by FCC. The Commission in- 
vited rule-making comments by Feb. 17 on the change, 
which was requested by Blue Mt. TV Assn., North Powder, 
Ore., to permit filling in small shadow areas. 

Vhf repeater applications by Carbon County, Utah, for 
authority to operate 3 stations serving Helper have been 
dismissed by FCC on grounds that they weren’t constructed 
before its July 7, 1960 legalizing deadline. Carbon County 
was advised to file applications for translator CPs. 

Yuma station-CATV conflict was washed out by FCC 
last week when it dismissed KIVA’s protest, at the station’s 
request, against microwave grants to Antennavision Service 
Co., which has bought the station. 

Add pay-TV protests: Citizens’ petitions against sub- 
scription TV continue to flow into the House (Vol. 17:2 p9). 
Among the latest is one from Norwich, Conn., introduced 
by Rep. Seely-Brown (R-Conn.). 

RCA translator equipment (TRA-1A series) has been 
announced as available for delivery within 60 days of orders. 
Single conversion (cross band) translators are priced at 
$1,995, dual conversion (low or high band) units at $2,450. 

Translator starts: K75AU & K78AU Maupin, Ore. 
began Dec. 18 repeating KGW-TV & KPTV Portland. 

Vhf translator grant: Ch. 6, Tex., to KFDA-TV (Ch. 
10) Amarillo. 

Foreign 

Uhf comes to Japan: The first uhf outlet programming 
in Japan — and the first U.S. Armed Forces station in that 
country — is Ch. 73, now telecasting to troops at Misawa 
Air Base on Northern Honshu. Japan, however, will get its 
own uhf stations soon. The Postal Ministry reportedly has 
decided to set up 100 booster or translator stations this year 
to eliminate blackout areas. Uhf outlets will serve areas 
surrounding large cities, while boosters along the Inland 
Sea & Northern Kyushu will be vhf. 

New drama chair has been established at England’s 
University of Manchester by commercial programmer 
Granada TV, to provide specialized instruction in TV, 
theater, and films. 

Licensed TV sets in Sweden now number more than one 
million, compared with only 15,000 at the start of tele- 
casting in 1957. There were 600,000 a year ago. 



6 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



Stations 

NEW & UPCOMING STATIONS: KIFI-TV (Ch. 8) Idaho 
Falls, Ida. received program test authorization Jan. 18 
for start Jan. 23 as the area NBC-TV affiliate. It takes 
over from KTLE (Ch. 6) Pocatello, whose mgr. Gloria 
Dillard says the station will quit unless it gets a net- 
work affiliation. The new starter raises the U.S. op- 
erating total to 580 (91 uhf) outlets. In Canada CFCF- 
TV (Ch. 12) Montreal, Que. started programming 
Jan. 20 as an independent English-language outlet, 
raising the Canadian on-air total to 80 TV stations. 

KIFI-TV has a 28-kw GE transmitter & a 100-ft. tower 
from Tower Construction Co. on Little Butte Mt. where 
CBS-ABC affiliate KID-TV (Ch. 3) Idaho Falls also has 
its transmitter. It has news & advertising offices in both 
Idaho Falls & Pocatello. Control of KIFI-TV & KIFI 
is held by the J. Robb Brady Trust. James M. Brady is pres., 
gen. mgr. and sales mgr.; Arthur S. Wiener, ex-KOLD- 
TV Tucson, operations mgr.; Blair G. Nelson, from radio 
KIFI, chief engineer. Base hour is $250. Rep is Meeker. 

CFCF-TV is using an 18-kw Marconi transmitter & a 
temporary tow-er with a 3-bay Alford slotted ring antenna 
to put out 80-kw visual ERP. It will go to a full 325-kw 
picture next summer after a second 18-kw Marconi trans- 
mitter is delivered in May and the 330-ft. tower it will 
share with CBC’s two Montreal outlets is completed. 
Owner is Canadian Marconi which has operated Montreal 
radio CFCF for 40 years. S. M. Finlayson is pres, of both 
Max-coni & CFCF-TV ; R. E. Misenei-, from CFCF, is gen. 
mgr.; Vin Dittmer, CFCF, business mgr.; R. J. Johnston, 
ex-CKLW-TV Windsor-Detroit sales mgr.; S. B. Haywai’d, 
ex-CKPT Peterborough, program mgr.; James Boyd, ex- 
CKSO-TV Sudbury, operations mgr.; P. A. Tweedie, 
CFCF, promotion mgr.; J. C. Douglas, CFCF, chief engi- 
neer. Base hour is $1000. Reps are Weed and All-Canada. 
* * * 

In our continuing survey of upcoming stations, here 
are the latest reports received from principals: 

WBNB (Ch. 10) Charlotte Amalie, V.I., with delivery 
of its 200-ft. Utility tower delayed until Dec. 31, has 
changed target for programming with CBS-TV & NBC-TV 
to Feb. 15. The information comes from Robert Moss, pres. 
& gen. mgr. A Gates 500-watt transmitter is being 
installed in the studio-transmitter building on Mountain 
Top Estate, St. Thomas. Base hour will be $60. Rep will be 
Caribbean Networks. 

WIPM-TV (Ch. 3) Mayaguez, P.R. has again changed 
tai-get — now Feb. 15 — for operation as a non-commercial 
outlet of the P.R. Dept, of Education, reports R. Delgado 
Marquez, gen. mgr. of the Dept.’s other station, WIPR-TV 
(Ch. 6, educational) San Juan. A 6-kw RCA ti-ansmitter is 
ready, but antenna won’t be installed on the 202-ft. Ideco 
tower until the end of January. 

CJOH-TV (Ch. 13) Ottawa, Ont. has advanced its 
programming target to March 1, reports W. O. Morrison 
for Pres. E. L. Bushnell. The transmitter house was 
scheduled for completion by Jan. 15 and an 18-kw Marconi 
transmitter is scheduled to arrive this month. Construction 
of a 600-ft. Microtower is scheduled for completion by Feb. 
15, as is the work on the temporary studio building. Base 
hour will be $475. Reps will be Young and Stovin-Byles. 
■ 

WUSN-TV Charleston, S.C., an NBC-TV affiliate for 6 
years, has signed as an ABC-TV primary outlet. 



Canadian Set Census: Canada’s TV set penetration rose 

last fall to 3,793,400, or 85% of the country’s 4,459,100 
households, according to the latest sampling survey of the 
Bureau of Broadcast Measurement. This is an increase of 
about 300,000 TV homes in the year since BBM’s fall 1959 
survey (Vol. 16:4 pl3), when penetration was 81%. 

The full survey results, by counties & census districts, 
will be included in the forthcoming Spring-Summer Tele- 
vision Factbook. Here are BBM’s estimates of TV 
households in Canada (excluding Yukon & Northwest ter- 
ritories) as of Nov. 1960: 



Province 


Population 


Households 


%TV 


TV 

Households 


Newfoundland 


463,000 


89,100 


58 


51,300 


Prince Edward Island .... 


104,000 


24,000 


71 


17,000 


Nova Scotia 




170,100 


86 


146,700 


New Brunswick 


605,000 


132,000 


81 


107,000 


Quebec 


6.166,500 


1,143,900 


92 


1,054,400 


Ontario 




1,593,100 


90 


1,432,700 


Manitoba 




232,000 


78 


180,200 


Saskatchewan 


914,000 


249.900 


72 


179,100 


Alberta 




350,000 


75 


262,000 


British Columbia 


1,628,000 


476,000 


76 


362,900 


TOTAL 


17,993,900 


4,459,100 


85 


3,793,400 



“Do-not-patronize” circulars constitute illegal sec- 
ondary boycotts when they are aimed at broadcast sponsors 
who themselves aren’t involved in labor disputes, according 
to NAB broadcast personnel & economics mgr. James H. 
Hulbert. He obtained NLRB permission to file a formal 
brief arguing NAB’s position in a case involving IBEW 
Local 662 & radio WOGA Chattanooga. Hulbert said it’s 
NAB’s conviction that the 1959 Landrum-Griffin Act 
specifically banned all secondary boycotts against “service” 
organizations such as broadcasting. IBEW distribution of 
lists of WOGA sponsors, asking listeners not to do business 
with them, could give the union a “stranglehold” on the 
station, Hulbert maintained. He said the IBEW-WOGA 
case has raised “a vital issue” not only for the Chattanooga 
station but for all TV & radio stations. 

NAFI Corp.’s broadcast division is negotiating for an 
additional TV station, we’re informed by Alvin Flanagan, 
pres, of the div. Flanagan, who declined to identify the 
station at this time, spiked as completely “untrue” a pub- 
lished report that NAFI is “disenchanted” with its broad- 
cast operations and is considering liquidation of those 
interests. “Those who have approached us for purchase [of 
our properties] have been so informed,” he said. NAFI 
stations are KCOP Los Angeles; KPTV Portland, Ore., 
KTVT Fort Worth and radio KXYZ Houston. 

Report that Hearst Corp. is negotiating for KFSD-TV 
San Diego was denied last week by that station’s vp-gen. 
sales mgr. Jay Grill. He told us the station had been 
taken off the market, and there are no negotiations for it 
now. He added that the news that Newsweek, which owns 
45.2% of the stock, wanted to get out of TV started a 
“parade of potential buyers.” United Artists TV was the 
last to negotiate but decided not to buy. “All these brokers 
made things very upsetting, so we took it off the market,” 
explained Grill. 

Record spending for promotion by TV-radio stations in 
1961 was forecast last week by Bcstrs. Promotion Assn. 
Pi-es. John F. Hurlbut. His survey of BPA membership 
found that 63% of the more than 350 stations have in- 
creased their promotion budgets — by an average 18.3%. 
Radio’s avei-age increase was 1.3 percentage points higher 
than TV’s. Audience promotion & image building were 
listed as the prime reasons for the increased spending, 
getting mentions on 62% in the survey. Runners-up: more 
sales promotion (18%) and trade-paper advertising (15%). 



VOL 17: No. 4 



7 



Programming 

More Headaches for ‘Untouchables’: On the heels of the 

hassle stirred up by U.S. Bureau of Prisons Dir. James V. 
Bennett (Vol. 17:3 pl4), a new problem faced ABC-TV 
and The Untouchables last week: An organized boycott by 
Italian-American viewers of products made by the show’s 
sponsors (Liggett & Myer Tobacco, Beech-Nut Life Savers 
Inc., Armour & Co., American Home Products). 

Announcement of the boycott plan (always a potent 
weapon in TV pressure plays) came last week from N.Y. 
Congressman Alfred E. Santangelo, who’s also state pres, 
in N.Y. of the Federation of the Italian-American Demo- 
cratic Organizations. Santangelo (whose nephew, Michael 
R. Santangelo, is the steam-heated publicity dir. of West- 
inghouse Bcstg. Co.) also announced another anti-Untouch- 
ables move. On March 9 — “Amerigo Vespucci Day” — the 
ABC hq at 7 West 66th St., N.Y. will be picketed by 
FIADO to protest “dramatizations which continually depict 
Italians as gangsters, racketeers & violators of the law.” 

The picketing & the boycott would be called off, Con- 
gressman Santangelo stated, “only if Mr. Goldenson meets 
personally with a committee of U.S. Congressmen serving 
on the board of governors of the Federation” to halt what 
the Federation believes is “stereotyping.” The committee 
consists of representatives Joseph P. Addabbo (Queens, 
N.Y.), Victor L. Anfuso (Brooklyn) and Santangelo. 

In Washington, Rep. Santangelo told us that all House 
members of Italian descent are with him all the way, but 
that he hasn’t approached Senators about it. “We haven’t 
gone to the FCC yet,” he said, “because we want to see 
what Goldenson does first.” He said that our roundup of 
next-season pilots (Vol. 17:3 p3) had been called to his 
attention and that he’s “very disturbed” by the apparent 
increase in “crime shows like The Untouchables." 

* * * 

TV violence “is hurting” the nation’s young viewers, 
writes columnist-TV host Ed Sullivan in February Good 
Housekeeping. “I wouldn’t allow any youngster under 14 
to watch any TV Western at any time. Youngsters, imagin- 
ative and impressionable, don’t find it so easy to distinguish 
between real life and make-believe. An 8-year-old may see 
a lynching and have nightmares for a week. I get a bang 
out of roaring back to the terrible twenties, but I hate to 
think of any youngster sopping up the weekly doses of 
whippings, chokings and wholesale slaughter that The 
Untouchables dishes out,” Sullivan writes. But he is 
“dead set against censorship, either by govt, or by organ- 
ized pressure groups,” wants “more control by parents.” 
* * * 

Filmed misrepresentations of “our nation or its people” 
which might damage U.S. prestige abroad are deplored in 
a House resolution (H. J. Res. 115) introduced by Rep. 
Smith (R-Cal.). It calls on the movie industry “to take 
appropriate action to make certain” that false pictures of 
American life aren’t distributed. 



CBS-TV’s “Harvest of Shame,” documentary oh mi- 
grant farm workers narrated by Edward R. Murrow, has 
come under attack in Congress. Rep. Weis (R-N.Y.) said 
she didn’t see the show herself but that she’d been told it 
“did not represent a balanced picture of the true situation.” 
She used the Congressional Record to reprint a statement 
by Wayne County (N.Y.) Farm Bureau Pres. Donald 
Holdridge, who complained that the program “depicted the 
worst possible conditions.” 



Index of U.S. Home TV Usage 



There’s been a steady gain in TV viewing, both day & 
night, during the 1960-61 season as compared with the 
previous season. October 1960 audience was larger than 
that of the previous October (see chart below, prepared 
for us by A. C. Nielsen Co.). The same is true of November 
viewing, thanks in part to heavy TV viewing sparked by 
the Presidential election early in the month. 

Average Audience Per Average Minute Daily Avg. Hrs. 

per home per day 

Day (10 a.m.-5 p.m.) Night (7-11 p.m.) 







% 


Number 


% 


Numebr 






Oct. 


1959 


.... 19.2 


(8,544,000) 


57.8 


(25,721,000) 


5 hrs. 3 


mins. 


Oct. 


1960 


.... 21.0 


(9,492,000) 


56.3 


(25,447,600) 


5 hrs. 13 


mins. 


Nov. 


1959 .... 


.... 19.4 


(8,633,000) 


59.8 


(26,611,000) 


5 hrs. 25 mins. 


Nov. 


I960 .... 


.... 21.7 


(9,808,400) 


60.5 


(27,346,000) 


5 hrs. 47 


mins. 



Streamlined for TV, Inauguration was carried by all 3 
networks Jan. 20, from 11 a.m. to about 4 p.m. The parade 
itself, which traditionally runs well over 4 hours, was “cut” 
to less than 3 to permit extensive TV coverage. No Inaug- 
uration sponsorship was in effect on any of the networks 
Jan. 20. However, there was a lot of “marginal” sponsor 
activity on CBS & NBC when Sen. John F. Kennedy took 
the Presidential oath. On CBS-TV, the motorcade to the 
Inauguration and the parade away from it were sponsored 
by Savings & Loan Foundation. Later that night on CBS- 
TV, Firestone sponsored Eyewitness to History show 
(10:30-11 p.m.), containing a taped re-play of the Inaug- 
uration and a live cut-away to the Inaugural Ball. Still 
later, Hanes Hosiery Mills sponsored an 11:15 p.m. to 
midnight pickup from the ball with Walter Cronkite & 
Nancy Hanschman as commentators. On NBC-TV, the Jan. 
20 Dave Garroway-Today show (participation sponsors) 
originated in Washington and was devoted in its entirety 
to the Inauguration ceremonies. Purex sponsored NBC’s 
coverage of the motorcade & parade, and an Inaugural Ball 
remote hosted by Arthur Van Horn & Phyllis Batelle. 

Fire at the Inaugural was stymied by WSB-TV At- 
lanta exec. dir. J. Leonard Reinsch. Spotting smoke curl- 
ing up from beneath the lectern during the invocation by 
Richard Cardinal Cushing, Reinsch went into action, draw- 
ing this on-camera comment from CBS-TV’s Walter Cron- 
kite: “Len Reinsch has dumped a cup of coffee down there, 
and I think the trouble is all over.” The trouble: a faulty 
electric heater. 

CBS will stretch Gunsmoke to 60-min. this fall, sched- 
uling it for 10-11 p.m. Sat. The expansion will “give the 
series added scope in terms of greater character & plot 
development,” says CBS-TV program vp Oscar Katz. (Al- 
though a failure when tried with The Lineup in the 1959- 
60 season, the trick of taking an air-tested 30-min. format 
and elongating it to an hour has worked nicely this season 
for Screen Gems’ Naked City series on ABC-TV.) Also in 
line to double to 60-min. is CBS’s 1959-60 Tightrope series. 
The Clarence Greene-Russell Rouse production team has a 
version for the 1961-62 season. The backlog of 30-min. 
Gunsmoke episodes, meanwhile* has become part of another 
CBS plan. Instead of launching it on the syndication 
market as a rerun package, CBS intends to sell backlogged 
episodes as station reruns — but using network lines to 
carry them. Under a title yet to be selected, the 30-min. 
reruns will be fed to affiliates, starting this fall, at Tue. 
7 :30-8 p.m. in station-option time. Stations will pay syndi- 
cation-type program fees to the network for the series, and 
will then sell spot announcements in the show. 



8 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



Film & Tape 

‘Red’ Move on Movies & TV: The motion picture industry 

& related TV film producers are making “a complete 
mockery” of the so-called “Waldorf Declaration of 1947” 
against employment of Communists & suspected Com- 
munists, according to House Un-American Activities Com- 
mittee Chmn. Walter (D-Pa.). 

Re-employment of once-blacklisted writers, producers 
and others is a “dismal & discouraging aspect of current 
developments in the film & TV industries,” Walter told the 
House. “Now the Communists are openly moving back” 
into Hollywood jobs from which 300-400 “since-identified 
Communist Party members” were once ousted, said Walter. 

Citing FBI dir. J. Edgar Hoover as the authority for 
his indictment, Walter also said: (1) “Adultery, abnormal- 
ity and adulation of criminals are the theme of a substan- 
tial number of today’s film offerings.” (2) “There are 
some unscrupulous leaders in the film & TV industries who 
value money above morals and whose lust for bigger & 
bigger profits leads them to turn out so-called entei'tain- 
ment of this type.” 

But Walter also found at least one “recent incident in 
the entertainment industry that is encouraging, heart- 
warming and inspiring.” He had praise for the perform- 
ance of Barbara Stanwyck in “Dragon by the Tail,” sched- 
uled for The Barbara Stanwyck Show on NBC-TV Jan. 30. 

At one point in this “drama which highlights the threat 
Communism poses to the United States,” Miss Stanwyck 
“was so carried away she forgot her lines,” Walter said, 
and “there were tears in her eyes when it ended.” He re- 
ported she had ad-libbed a line to a Chinese Communist 
agent in the show: “Now you & your pals in Peiping, you 
keep your cottonpicking Red hands off my country.” 

Urging his colleagues to watch the NBC-TV show, 
Walter said that “this, too, is Hollywood — the Hollywood 
of the real America.” 

* * * 

KTTV Los Angeles showed the Stanwyck scene on a 
news show. Our attempts to determine whether Miss Stan- 
wyck had actually ad libbed, drew no pertinent answers 
from her network, her press agent, her agent or her home. 



CBS-TV program vp Oscar Katz, in Hollywood last 
week for discussions on programming for next season, had 
an explanation for why the mid-season casualty list in TV 
film hasn’t been as large as was expected. Said he: “There 
are a number of shows with moderate ratings which are 
sufficient to warrant a 26-week renewal for the remainder 
of the season, but not good enough for next season.” TV 
has gotten more competitive than ever, he pointed out, 
acknowledging that Thursday has been CBS-TV’s weak 
night this season. Of the 7 new shows in the last Nielsen 
top 40, 5 are CBS-TV, Katz said — Candid Camera, The 
Andy Griffith Show, Route 66, Pete & Gladys and Check- 
mate. He couldn’t see, on the basis of what’s happened 
this season, any forseeable trends for next. 

BBDO clients have canceled 2 film series & renewed 
one for next season. Du Pont Textile Fibers division, cut- 
ting back on its budget, axed The Du Pont Show with June 
Ally son, produced by Four Star Television, and Westclox 
has axed The Tab Hunter Show, produced by Shunto Pro- 
ductions. At the same time, Rexall Drug, an alternate 
sponsor of National Velvet, produced by MGM-TV, has 
renewed that series for next season. General Mills, the 
other alternate, hasn’t reached a decision. 



Intercontinental’s 3 Packages: Walter Reade, Jr. an- 

nounced last week the formation of Intercontinental Tele- 
vision Inc., a TV production-packaging-distributing com- 
pany owned by Continental Distributing Inc. and affiliated 
with the Walter Reade Group. Continental Distributing 
Pres. Irving Wormser (also pres, of the new company) 
said his firm hoped to attract “a tremendous home audience 
through selective programming,” starting with 3 TV 
packages: International Playhouse, Continental Feature 
Films and Golden Time. 

International Playhouse is a 13-film series of 90-min. 
features produced by John Woolf for British commercial 
TV. It is aimed at the “lost” TV audience — “those people 
who have refused to recognize TV because of what they 
consider to be excessive commercialism,” according to 
Wormser. Laurence Harvey, Hildegarde Neff and Louis 
Jourdan are among personalities featured in the films. 

Continental Feature Films is a package of features 
from Continental Distributing’s post-1954 library, includ- 
ing a pre-war film classic, “Grand Illusion.” 

Golden Time is a 39-episode, 30-min. animated show 
adapted from the Simon & Schuster children’s series of 
Golden Books and records in a co-production deal with 
Fremantle International. The original S&S writers, artists 
and musicians will contribute to the series, which will be 
sold internationally by Fremantle. All 3 packages will be 
offered first to networks and, barring acceptance, will be 
syndicated by Intercontinental. 



Wolper-Sterling Productions has sold its tentatively- 
titled film special, “The Legend of Valentino,” to Peter Pan 
Foundations which plans to place it in 27 major markets 
for early-May airing. The 60-min. biography of the silent- 
screen star is constructed around old clips & private 
film collections. It will include many Valentino shots 
“never seen before,” according to Sterling TV Pres. Saul 
J. Turell. Sterling announced 2 other major contracts re- 
cently: An additional cycle of Silents Please for ABC-TV, 
and a distribute » deal on Theodore Granik’s current 
events series, Youth Wants to Know. Sterling expects to 
gross over $2 million on the 3 deals in the next 3 years. 

IATSE negotiations with Alliance of Television Film 
Producers and Assn, of Motion Picture Producers are 
progressing “satisfactorily,” insiders report (Vol. 17:3 p8). 
IATSE’s contract with the TV-film & movie studios expires 
Jan. 31. IATSE International Pres. Richard M. Walsh is 
participating for the unions; Richard Jencks, Alliance 
pres, represents his group, and AMP vp Charles Boren is 
negotiator for the majors. 

Official Films has acquired exclusive world TV rights 
to Paramount Pictures’ newsreel library. The 7% year 
agreement is a “first,” according to Official Films Pres. 
Seymour Reed who plans to use the film — 10 million feet 
covering events from 1928 to 1958 — for 30- & 60-min. docu- 
mentaries & TV specials. 

Screen Actors Guild members have voted by 99.3% to 
approve the TV-commei’cials contract recently negotiated 
with the networks, advertising agencies and producers 
(Vol. 16:51 p3). The contract had been negotiated jointly 
by SAG and AFTRA. 

“Tarzan” tackled the N.Y. rating race — and won Jan. 9 
when WCBS-TV N.Y. aired the first of its Banner Films 26- 
feature “Tarzan” library. The picture drew an 18.9 Arbi- 
tron in the early shbw, highest in the showcase’s history. 



VOL. 17: No. 4 



9 



NEW YORK ROUNDUP 



Music on the air has done much to stimulate the pub- 
lic’s interest in everything from concert-going to record- 
collecting, points out Broadcast Music Inc. (the broadcast- 
industry-created firm which licenses the music of many 
U.S. composers & publishers) in a brochure recently pub- 
lished to celebrate BMI’s 20th anniversary. There were, 
said BMI, 250 symphony orchestras, large & small, in the 
U.S. in 1939 and 15 million people played musical instru- 
ments. In 1960, the orchestra figure had jumped to 1,200 
and 31 million Americans were making their own music. 
Last year, 1,262 of the country’s AM & FM stations pro- 
grammed an average total of 13,300 total hours of concert 
music each week, or 10.5 hours per station per week. 

Screen Gems’ Fred Flintstone, cartoon star on the 
Hanna-Barbera animated show on ABC-TV, begins a per- 
sonal appearance tour next month. A life-size animated 
statue of Fred, electronically rigged to speak in the voice 
(actor Alan Reed’s) of the TV character, has been made 
available to the ABC-TV affiliates. Over 35 stations have 
signed for the promotion stunt. “Live” appearances by 
Huckleberry Hound and other Hanna-Barbera characters 
are also being promoted by SG (Vol. 17:2 pl2). 

Ziv-UA 1960 sales were up 26% over 1959, a substan- 
tial rise considering the generally poor syndication season. 
Sponsor deals — both national & regional — led station buys, 
and sales were made to all 3 networks, the film company 
announced. Ziv-UA programs were seen in 92% of the 
321 U.S. markets and on 89.1% of the 531 commercial sta- 
tions. In nearly 40 top markets including N.Y. & Chicago, 
Ziv-UA had shows on every station. 

Screen Gems’ Yogi Bear has a busy season ahead. A 
new 30-min. TV series based on the Hanna-Barbera char- 
acter debuts on 130 stations at the end of this month. On 
Feb. 5 Yogi Bear goes into 80 McNaught Syndicate Sunday 
newspapers. Some of the papers which will carry the TV- 
born color comic strip are the N.Y. Herald-Tribune, Chi- 
cago Tribune, Washington Star and the Los Angeles Times. 

Add syndication sales: UAA’s Popeye cartoon series, 
has been bought by WIIC Pittsburgh for the 5th con- 
secutive year ... 7 Arts has sold its 40-feature post-1950 
Warner Bros, package to 3 more stations, upping total 
markets to 34. New sales: WTOP-TV Washington, D.C., 
WJXT Jacksonville, KARK-TV Little Rock. 

Movietone News-UPI’s first production venture into 
the N.Y. TV documentary field is “De Gaulle and the 6- 
Year War.” The filmed program spans the rise & fall of 4 
French republics and includes films of the recent referen- 
dum on Algerian self-determination. It will be telecast on 
WPIX N.Y. Jan. 24 (10-10:30 p.m.). 

BBC-TV visitors Frank Muir & Denis Norden are here 
to “study American TV.” The British comedy-writing- 
performing team, known for their 12-year-run BBC Radio 
series Take It from Here, will be in the U.S. until the end 
of the month to confer with U.S. writers & producers. 

People: Norman Katz has resigned as UAA dir. of 
foreign operations to become Television Industries foreign 
operations vp . . . Abert S. Goustin, formerly Ziv-UA 
Uastern div: sales mgr., has been named gen. mgr. of the 
company’s new special plans div. 



HOLLYWOOD ROUNDUP 



WNTA-TV N.Y. will show a film presentation to ad 

agencies & potential clients this week in Los Angeles (Jan. 
23) & San Francisco (Jan. 24). Attending the West Coast 
meetings will be the station’s Henry S. White, vp-gen.-mgr.; 
spot sales vp Donald J. Quinn; Mike Wallace, narrator of 
the film, and David Susskind. Next month the film will be 
shown to agencies in N.Y. & other cities. 

Desilu Productions’ Harrigan & Son, which stars Pat 
O’Brien and is on ABC-TV, has been renewed by Reynolds 
Metals for 24 more segments this season. . . . Desilu’s 
Guestward Ho! (Joanne Dru, J. Carrol Naish, Mark Miller 
and Flip Mark) has also been renewed for the rest of the 
season — by Ralston-Purina & Seven-Up. 

Four Star Television’s pilot, The Freshman, starring 
Gertrude Berg & Sir Cedric Hardwicke, has been sold to 
General Foods for next season — 39 first-run segments; no 
network yet selected. It’s the second Four Star sale for next 
season. First: NBC-TV’s 60-min. Dick Powell-hosted an- 
thology series. 

CMW Productions producer Charles Marquis Warren 
has finished this season’s production of Rawhide for CBS- 
TV, and is filming 26 segments of The Gunslinger, 60-min. 
series starting on CBS-TV in February. Tony Young and 
Midge Ware star in the new show. Warren will resume 
production on Rawhide for next season April 30. 

Gomalco Productions’ comedy-anthology series (Vol. 
17:3 pll) is based on Ogden Nash works, will be hosted 
by a comedian. Gomalco, owned by George Gobel & David 
O’Malley, is also planning a musical version of Rip Van 
Winkle, a 90-min. film special starring Gobel. 

MGM-TV has shelved plans for co-production of 2 
pilots, Cafe Bravo and Two for the Money, with Arena 
Productions (owned by Norman Felton). MGM-TV has 
also dropped Zero One, which it had planned as a co- 
production with BBC-TV. 

Television Film Assn, has re-elected John P. Ballinger 
of Screen Gems as pres.; Jack M. Goetz of Consolidated 
Film Industries, vp, and Nicholas C. Muskey of Bekins 
Film Service Center, secy.-treas. 

Hugh O’Brian Productions, owned by the cowboy star, 
is packaging a situation comedy and an anthology series, 
Fright, in association with ABC-TV. 

Bill Burrud Productions and the Jerry Ross organiza- 
tion are packaging & producing U.S.A., a half-hour series 
to be filmed in color. 

Curtleigh Productions, independent company owned by 
Tony Curtis, will produce TV film series as well as movies. 

Format Films will pilot an animated TV film series, 
Kecmar, the Invisible Boy. 

People: Harold Goldman, former NTA vp and more 
recently with Famous Artists agency, has left Famous to 
develop TV & movie properties for his Television Enter- 
prises Corp. . . . John Erman is named casting dii'ector at 
20th Century-Fox TV . . . Walter Pidgeon has been ap- 
pointed to Screen Actors Guild board . . . Earl Booth is 
named story editor on MGM-TV’s The Asphalt Jungle . . . 
Warner Bros, has signed John Monks Jr. to write The 
Force, a 90-min. movie which will serve as the pilot for a 
series about the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 




10 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



The FCC 

Agencies Get Modest Budget Hikes: FCC’s 1962 fiscal 

budget, as proposed by the Eisenhower Administration, but 
subject to revision by the Kennedy Administration, pro- 
vides for an over-all appropriations increase to $12,525,000 
from $11,789,000 in funds obligated for fiscal 1961. No 
sharp step-ups in any FCC programs were outlined in the 
figuring by the out-going Administration for the year 
ending June 30, 1962. 

Among the items: $2,935,000 vs. $2,616,000 for broad- 
cast activities; $1 million (same as in the current year) for 
the special N.Y. uhf project; $10,439,000 vs. $9,936,000 for 
salaries of an average of 1,366 employes instead of the 
present 1,297. In submitting the budget to Congress, 
President Eisenhower also recommended legislation to 
“strengthen the position” of the FCC chmn. by assigning 
executive & administrative duties specifically to him. 

Relatively modest increases for FTC also were pro- 
posed in the Eisenhower budget. It would get a total 
appropriation of $9,640,000 vs. $8,010,000 for the current 
fiscal year and its payroll would be raised from an average 
of 850 employes to 1,020. “In 1962, field investigation & 
trial of deceptive practice cases will be expedited,” the bud- 
get said. 

Recommended for USIA was a 1962 budget of $110,- 
600,000 vs. $103,485,000. Its budget included $18,814,000 
(up from $18,052,000) for radio (Voice of America) 
service, $1,871,000 (up from $1,370,000) for TV service. 



Prospective new FCC Chmn. Newton N. Minow spent 
a busy 2 days in Washington Jan. 18-19 before the Inaug- 
ural. The first day, he lunched with Senate Commerce 
Committee Chmn. Magnuson (D-Wash.), and conferred 
with Sen. Pastore (D-R.I.), Commerce Communications 
Subcommittee chmn. He spent the entire next day at FCC, 
discussing activities with bureau chiefs & Chmn. Ford, 
lunching with the other Commissioners (Hyde & King 
absent). Commission sources say they’re very favorably 
impressed with Minow, note that he & Ford “seem to hit it 
off very well.” Said one observer: “He’s modest, unassum- 
ing, makes no bones of the fact that the field is new to him. 
His questions were intelligent & he listened well. He’s 
certainly personable — has a sense of humor.” Magnuson 
has set no date for his confirmation hearing but it’s 
expected in early February, and he’ll probably report for 
full-time duty in Washington about March 1. 

Spectrum allocation study by a 5-man federal com- 
mission has again been proposed by Sen. Hartke (D-Ind.). 
In a resolution (S. J. Res. 32) he revived his plan — first 
advanced last year (Vol. 16:27 p6) — for a “study & report 
on the organization of the FCC and the manner in which 
the radio spectrum is allocated in the agencies & instru- 
mentalities of the federal govt.” Commission members 
would be appointed by the White House, Senate, House and 
FCC. Asking for action on his resolution, Hartke said: 
“There is no over-all telecommunications policy. This is 
deplorable.” In the House, Rep. Harris (D-Ark.) has 
reintroduced a bill (HR-1162) to establish a Presidentially- 
appointed 3-member Frequency Allocation Board with 
authority to set policy for FCC and make allocations on its 
own initiative (Vol. 17:2 p3). 

New TV CPs granted by FCC: Alpine, Tex. Ch. 12, to 
Big Bend Bcstrs. (Electron Corp., P.O. Box 5570, Dallas). 
Flagstaff, Ariz. Ch. 9, to Coconino Telecasters Inc., 15 
Broad St., N.Y. 



Ex-FCC Chmn. John C. Doerfer, now practicing law in 
Washington, has been designated secy.-treas. & dir. of 
Nemir Industries Inc., Bethesda, Md. plastics-processing 
company in which the Storer Bcstg. Co. has interests. An 
exhibit (No. 13-m) attached to a Storer stock-offering 
statement filed with SEC (Vol. 17:1 p20) disclosed that 
Nemir agreed to make Doerfer an officer as one condition of 
a contract, dated Sept. 20, 1960, under which Storer loaned 
Nemir $190,000. The agreement also gave Storer an option 
to buy 50% of the Bethesda company’s stock for $400,000. 
Storer dirs. George B. Storer Jr. & Stanley F. Willis were 
placed on the Nemir board along with Doerfer, whose 
salary as secy.-treas. wasn’t reported in the SEC statement. 
The contract specified that not more than $25,000 per year 
would be paid to Pres. Clarence T. Nemir of the plastics 
firm, whose subsidiaries include American Fibre Co. and 
American Bowl ‘N’ Cup. Other diversified Storer interests 
include the Miami Beach Sun and Standard Tube Co. 
Doerfer resigned from FCC last March after acknowledg- 
ing at a House Commerce Legislative Oversight Subcom- 
mittee hearing that he had accepted plane-&-yacht hospital- 
ity from Storer Pres. George B. Storer (Vol. 16:11 p3). 

Another short-term renewal of a broadcasting license 
has been ordered by FCC. Radio WSTS Massena, N.Y. was 
given an extension only to April 1, 1962. It was called on 
meanwhile “to rectify certain past technical violations 
involving transmitter operation & equipment readings & 
measurements by unlicensed personnel, and failure to main- 
tain operating logs as required by the rules.” The first 
such short-term renewals were handed out to Richard Eaton 
for his WMUR-TV Manchester, N.H. & 4 radios (Vol. 17:2 
pl3). In the Massena case, FCC also ordered a 2-month 
suspension of the first-class operator license of WSTS 
staffer Jack F. Kessler. 

Ed Craney’s sale of his KXLF-TV & KXLF Butte, 
Montana and KXLJ-TV & KXLJ Helena to Joseph S. 
Sample, operator of KOOK-TV Billings (Vol. 16:42 pll), 
has been approved by FCC. The price was $1,575,000, and 
Craney agreed not to compete in TV or radio for 7 years 
within a radius of 35 miles of Butte or Helena. At the 
same time, FCC approved the subsequent sale of the 
Helena stations by Sample for $400,000 to Helena T. V. 
Inc., local CATV operator with which Craney had feuded. 

Allocations actions by FCC: Finalized: (1) Adding 
educational Ch. 36 to Milwaukee, substituting Ch. 52 for 
Ch. 51 in Beaver Dam. (2) Adding Ch. 19 to Bay City, 
Mich., substituting Ch. 25 for Ch. 19 in Midland and Ch. 
21 for Ch. 25 in East Tawas. Denied: Petition by WCTV 
(Ch. 6) Tallahassee-Thomasville (Ga.) to reallocate Ch. 6 
to Tallahassee, Commission holding there was “no com- 
pelling public interest” reason for the change. 

Educational Television 

Federal aid to ETV got another boost in Congress with 
introduction by Rep. McIntyre (R-Me.) of a bill (HR-2910) 
providing $l-million govt, grants to each state & D.C. for 
station equipment purchases. The McIntyre measure is 
identical with one (HR-965) sponsored by Chmn. Harris 
of the House. Commerce Committee (Vol. 17:2 p3). 

ETV equipment manual, prepared by an EIA task force 
headed by Motorola’s Philip A. Jacobson, has been published 
at $4.95 by McGraw-Hill Book Co., 330 W. 42nd St., N.Y. 
The illustrated book covers technical applications of such 
facilities as translators, video tape, closed-circuit library- 
reference systems. 



VOL. 17: No. 4 



Networks 



Congress 

Congressional investigation of press & TV handling of 
Richard M. Nixon’s campaign for President has been 
demanded by the Davenport Daily Times in an editorial 
endorsed by Rep. Schwengel (R-Ia.). Complaints by Nixon 
that some coverage of his campaign was unfair “have more 
substance than the pucker of sour grapes,” Schwengel told 
the House. Inserted in the Congressional Record by 
Schwengel, the newspaper’s editorial called for an official 
probe of such incidents as “the ruined TV presentation” of 
President Eisenhower & Vice President Nixon in end-of- 
the-campaign appearances on la. & 111. stations. “While 
failure of a mechanical device was blamed, the fact remains 
programs preceding & following the campaign broadcast 
were not affected,” the Daily Times said darkly. 

Senate “watchdog” hearings on TV & radio compliance 
with the Communications Act’s equal-time Sec. 315 in the 
1960 election campaign (Vol. 17:2 p4) may be scheduled 
this week by the Commerce Freedom of Communications 
Subcommittee. Chmn. Yarborough (D-Tex.) had hoped to 
set dates & witnesses for equal-time hearings last week, 
following the full Committee’s confirmation hearing for 
new Commerce Secy. Luther H. Hodges, but was unable to 
get his 3-man unit together for a planning session. Mean- 
while, Sen. Pastore (D-R.I.) announced that his Commerce 
Communications Subcommittee will conduct hearings Jan. 
31 to learn from FCC, networks & NAB how the suspen- 
sion of Sec. 315 for Presidential candidates worked during 
the campaign. 

Kudos to NBC-TV have been awarded by Senate 
Majority Leader Mansfield (D-Mont.) for the network’s 
White Paper documentaries on “The U-2 Affair” and 
anti-segregation sit-in demonstrations in the South. He 
told the Senate NBC-TV “is to be highly commended for 
its successful efforts to originate & present programs of 
such unique national importance.” Sen. Proxmire (D-Wis.) 
also singled out “The U-2 Affair” for praise. Inserting the 
script of the program in the Congressional Record as 
another example of good TV (Vol. 17:3 pl5), Proxmire 
said it showed how the medium “can change history.” 

Rep. John Bell Williams (D-Miss.), ranking majority 
member of the House Commerce Committee who had been 
slated for a purge because he bolted his party in the Pres- 
idential election (Vol. 16:47 p6), apparently is set for 
another Congressional session. The seniority of Bell & 
other Miss. Democrats who opposed John F. Kennedy’s 
election seemed assured when the Democratic Committee on 
Committees abandoned a plan to remove Rep. Colmer from 
the powerful rules committee. 

Smaller-market stations would be exempted from over- 
time pay provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act under 
terms of a bill (HR-2746) reintroduced by Rep. Abernethy 
(D-Miss.). Similar exemptions for broadcasters were con- 
tained in wage-hour law amendments wTiich died in a 
Senate-House conference in last Congress (Vol. 16:36 p5). 

Hardy perennial of Congressional proposals — legisla- 
tion to extend radio daytimers’ operating hours to 6 a.m.- 
6 p.m. from sunrise-to-sunset — has appeared again. Rep. 
Abernethy (D-Miss.), author of a daytimer bill last year 
(Vol. 16:3 p6), was first in line with another one (HR-2745). 

“National AGVA Week” would be observed officially 
June 4-10 under terms of a resolution (H.J. Res. 149) 
sponsored by House Judieiary Chmn. Celler (D-N.Y.). 



CBS has closed its Production Sales unit in N.Y. Its 
functions — custom production of video-taped commercials 
& programs — will be absorbed within the network. Rea- 
sons: (1) The tape-producing corporate offspring was op- 
erating semi-autonomously, building up a large gross 
income but making little or no profit because of extended 
overhead & administrative personnel (some of whom will 
now be pink-slipped). (2) CBS is closing down 3 more of 
its N.Y. live TV studios, thereby relieving the pressure to 
keep studios occupied. NBC is continuing the semi-auto- 
nomous identity of its NBC Telesales unit (tape commer- 
cials, pilots, etc.) under Dir. Jerry Madden. 

Another foreign network sale was scored by ABC-TV 
last week. Parker Pen Co. (through local market agencies) 
and Vick Chemical (through Morse International) signed a 
26-week contract to start in March with the Central Amer- 
ican TV Network, which ABC represents and in which it 
has an interest. Similar deals were recently made by 
Nestle (Vol. 16:45 p9) and Goodyear (Vol. 16:50 p4). 
Parker & Vick will co-sponsor a Spanish-dubbed, weekly 
half-hour series, the Ida Lnpino Show (actually, retitled 
episodes of Four Star Playhouse) . ABC also announced 
that its 4-market foreign affiliate in Venezuela — CVT — 
“Telecumbre” (Vol. 16:33 p9) will begin operations Feb. 1. 

Directors Guild of America has granted an extension of 
its contract with the TV & radio networks, which expired 
Dec. 31. The networks asked for the extension because they 
have been so involved in negotiations with SAG and 
AFTRA. Negotiations begin in N.Y. March 15, and April 
10 is the deadline under the extension. 

NBC and Japan’s Fuji Telecasting Co. have signed a 
contract for cooperation in TV broadcasting technology. 
The pact, first of its kind in the telecasting field, has been 
authorized by the Japan Foreign Investment Council. 

“Slight loss” for ABC Radio continues, although 1960 
gains have “cut that loss impressively and present a very 
favorable picture for the current year.” ABC radio vp 
Robert Pauley so summarized 1960 activities last week. 



NETWORK SALES ACTIVITY 



ABC-TV 

Championship bridge, Sun. 4-4:30 p.m., part. eff. Feb. 
Amana (Maury, Lee & Marshall) 

Hawaiian Eye, Wed. 9-10 p.m.,, part. eff. April. 

American Chicle (Ted Bates) 

Stagecoach West, Tue. 9-10 p.m., part. eff. April. 

Simoniz (Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample) 

The Roaring Twenties, Sat. 7:30-8:30 p.m., part. eff. Jan. 

Peter Paul (Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample) 

Daytime programming, renewed part. eff. this month. 

Minute Maid (Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample) 
Lever Brothers (Foote, Cone & Belding) 
Cliesebrough-Ponds (Compton) 

NBC-TV 

The Shirley Temple Show, Sun. 7-8 p.m.; Michael Shayne, 
Fri. 10-11 p.m., part. eff. April. 

Fedders (Hicks & Greist) 

Americans, Mon. 7:30-8:30 p.m.; Laramie, Tue. 7:30-8:30 
Michael Shayne, Fri. 10-11 p.m.; Outlaws, 
Thu. 7:30-8:30 p.m., part. eff. Jan. 

Gillette (Maxon) 



12 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



Television Digest 

PUBLISHED BY TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. 

WALTER H. ANNENBERG, President 

PUBLICATION OFFICE Radnor, Pa., MUrray 8-3940, TWXi Radnor 1028 

JAMES T. QUIRK, MERRILL PANITT, Editorial Director 

Business Manager HAROLD B. CLEMENKO, Managing Editor 
DAVID LACHENBRUCH, Asst. Mng. Editor 
JAMES B. DELEHANTY, HAROLD RUSTEN, Associate Editor 

Asst. Business Mgr. PAUL STONE 



WASHINGTON BUREAU 
Wyatt Building 
Wathington 5, D.C. 
Sterling 3-1755 
ALBERT WARREN, Chief 
WILBUR H. BALDINGER 
WM. J. McMAHON Jr. 



MARTIN CODEL 
Associate Publisher 



NEW YORK BUREAU 
625 Madison Ave., 
New York 22, N.Y. 
Plaza 2-0195 

CHARLES SINCLAIR, Chief 

WEST COAST BUREAU 
6362 Hollywood Blvd. 
Hollywood 28, Cal. 
Hollywood 5-5210 
DAVID KAUFMAN 



TELEVISION DIGEST. Published Mondays. Subscription $75 annually. 
For group rates & other subscription services, write Business Office. 

TELEVISION FACTBOOK TV & AM-FM ADDENDA AM-FM DIRECTORY 
Published March & Sept. Published Saturdays Published in January 

Copyright 1961, by Triangle Publications, Inc. 



Personals: William c. MacPhail appointed vp, CBS-TV 

Sports, a new dept.; James M. Dolan named to similar post, 
CBS Radio . . . Richard McCutcheon, ex-CBS-TV public 
affairs producer, named to head new Time & Life N.Y. 
best. new T s bureau. Wallace J. Jorgenson named managing 
dir., WBTV Charlotte, N.C., succeeding Kenneth I. Tred- 
will Jr., resigned. 

Orville J. Sapher appointed engineering dir., WOR div. 
of RKO General . . . Howard D. Duncan Jr. promoted from 
gen. sales mgr. to gen. mgr., WEHT Evansville, Ir.d., 
succeeding Edwin G. Richter, formerly named mgr., KGUN- 
TV Tucson, Ariz. James H. Manion promoted to gen. sales 
mgr., WEHT . . . Mike Schaffer, ad & promotion dir., 
WFIL-TV & WFIL Philadelphia, named publicity dir., BPA. 

. . . Sylvia Kessler, ex-private law practice, rejoins FCC in 
Office of Opinions & Review . . . Evelyn Eppley, ex-legal 
asst, to FCC Comr. King, shifts to Rules & Standards Div. 



Richard Eaton was honored by the Washington Ad Club 
Jan. 10, receiving its “achievement award,” for his “con- 
tributions to broadcasting” (Vol. 17:2 pl3) at a luncheon 
featuring speeches by Sen. Jackson (D-Wash.) and Ran- 
dolph (D-W.Va.). Jackson lauded Eaton for operating his 
stations “to meet the daily needs of his communities,” 
stating that they had achieved several “firsts” — in 24-hour 
operations, educational programs, and hiring of a Negro 
disc jockey. Randolph called attention to Eaton’s non- 
broadcast activities, including the adoption of 5 refugee 
children and establishment of a fellowship which brings a 
French physician to the U.S. annually for a year’s study. 
Head-table guests included Sen. Williams (D-N.J.) and 
FCC members Bartley & Lee. Eaton owns WMUR-TV 
Manchester, N.H. and radios WJMO Cleveland, WANT 
Richmond, WOOK Washington, WINX Rockville, Md., 
WSID Baltimore, WBNX N.Y., WFAB Miami. 

Meetings next week: American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers winter general meeting (Jan. 29-Feb. 3), Statler- 
Hilton, N.Y. • Advertising Federation of America annual 
mid-winter conference (31-Feb. 1) and Congressional recep- 
tion (1). James M. Landis, asst, on regulatory agencies to 
President John Kennedy, will speak. Statler-Hilton, Wash- 
ington * Military Electronics winter convention (Feb. 
1-3), sponsored by National Professional Group on Military 
Electronics and IRE Los Angeles section, Biltmore, L.A. 



Meetings this week: Okla. Bcstrs. Assn. (Jan. 23-24). 
FCC Comr. John S. Cross will speak. Biltmore Hotel, 
Oklahoma City • Academy of TV Arts & Sciences (24). 
Subject: foreign films. Beverly Hilton, Beverly Hills • 
RTES timebuying & selling seminar (24). Harry Renfro, 
head of TV-radio at D’Arcy Advertising, will speak on use 
of spot announcements, local programs or syndication. 
Hotel Lexington, N.Y. • Ga. Radio & TV Institute (24-26), 
sponsored by Ga. Assn, of Bcstrs. and Henry W. Grady 
School of Journalism, U. of Ga. Speakers include: Maurice 
B. Mitchell, Encyclopedia Britannica Films pres.; Arthur 
Hull Hayes, CBS Radio pres.; Harold R. Krelstein, Plough 
Bcstg. Co. pres.; Robert F. Hurleigh, MBS pres.; Norman 
E. (Pete) Cash, pres., TvB. U. of Ga., Athens • S.C. 
Bcstrs. Assn, annual winter convention (24-26). Charles H. 
Tower, NAB vp, will speak. Hotel Columbia, Columbia. 

TV-radio welfare foundation to aid needy industry 
veterans has been established by the N.Y. chapter of Broad- 
cast Pioneers. Eligible for health & financial aid are per- 
sons engaged in radio for 20 years or more or in TV for 
over 10. The organization also announced an annual mike 
aw’ard to be presented to outstanding stations. The first 
will go to Crosley Bcstg. Corp.’s pioneering radio outlet, 
WLW Cincinnati. 

New FAA administrator is Najeeb E. Halaby, secy.- 
treas. of the Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, who replaces 
Elwood P. Quesada. His private research firm has been the 
main technical advisor for Air Force ballistic missiles & 
space programs. Halaby was 1948-54 deputy asst, defense 
secy, for international security. 



Technology 

PORTABLE TV PROJECTOR: A simple, low-cost TV pro- 
jector, weighing only 67 lb., has been put into produc- 
tion by Dalto Electronics Corp., Norwood, N.J., manu- 
facturer of aircraft flight simulators. It’s designed for 
school, club, hotel, business-meeting — and possibly 
home — use. TelePrompTer, which has been looking in 
on the development for several months, has snapped up 
the first 10 units. 

TelePrompTer is now putting a prototype unit through 
its paces — but its officials are already enthusiastic enough 
to make the new Dalto projector the nucleus of a proposed 
home “communication wall” with 4% x 6-ft. rear-screen 
“picture-on-the-wall” TV. TelePrompTer is currently nego- 
tiating with builders of a 900-unit Chicago apartment 
development for installation of the wall set in all units. 
(For details, see p. 16.) 

For more immediate use, TelePrompTer is interested 
in the projector for installation in military briefing rooms, 
small hotel & restaurant business-meeting set-ups and in 
schoolrooms. “Its reliability, flexibility, ease of operation 
are superior to anything on the market,” we were told by 
TelePrompTer communications vp Nat C. Myers Jr. 

Observing a demonstration of the Dalto projector — 
designated, for some obscure reason, the “Amphicon 108” — 
we saw a sharp, clear picture projected on a 9 x 12-ft. 
beaded movie screen in a semi-darkened room. The bright- 
ness was somewhat below that of more elaborate TV pro- 
jectors. Dalto officials said that with a 9 x 12-ft. image on a 
beaded screen, highlight brightness is about 4 foot-lamberts, 
as opposed to about 5 for existing systems. With a 4% x 6- 
ft. screen, brightness is said to be about 10 foot-lamberts. 

The Amphicon 108 will list at $1,950, covering TV 



VOL. 17: No. 4 



13 



tuner, power supply and projection unit, and will be dis- 
tributed through manufacturers’ reps, closed-circuit spe- 
cialists and/or audio-visual equipment dealers. The list 
price is said to include “good markups’’ all along the line. 

Secret of the Amphicon is a new cathode-ray tube and 
direct refraction optics — it’s the first major TV projector 
which doesn’t require an imported Schmidt optical system. 
The refraction optic principle is the same as that used in 
conventional slide projectors — and the projection lens 
focuses in the same way. 

Dalto has also developed a 3-tube color version of the 
Amphicon, hopes to market it within 6 months at about 
$4,500. Among other projection-TV projects in the works 
at Dalto, according to engineering vp Arthur R. Tucker: A 
higher-priced version with Schmidt optical system and 
same high-brightness tube which should give “theater 
quality brightness” of 15-foot lamberts; an /I lens (current 
model has /I .5) which should double the brightness of the 
present refractive system. 

Dalto is already advertising the projector in magazines 
aimed at club executives and audio-visual dealers. One big 
selling point is simplicity — only 2 operator controls on the 
black-&-white model, 4 on color set (vs. as many as 57 on 
some color projectors). Says Tucker: “It’s the first TV 
projector simple enough for a school teacher to operate.” 

The projector is an outgrowth of Dalto’s development 
of TV readout systems for airline flight simulators. It uses 
a flat-faced 5-in. CR tube (replacement cost $90). The 
complete equipment — power supply, TV tuner, projection 
head, audio system — is housed in 2 cases, 9 x 18 x 22 and 
G x 9 x 17 inches. Dalto is manufacturing the tube, tuner 
and projection system. 

The company has produced 12 prototypes, is now at 
work on a 2nd group and will have production units in 60 
days, according to Tucker. 



“First thermoelectric power generator for industrial 
application” has been built by Westinghouse for the 
Northern 111. Gas Co. The 100-watt unit will be used to 
supply DC current to prevent self-corrosion of the utility’s 
pipelines and to charge batteries of a microwave relay 
communications system. The generator’s heat source is 
propane gas. It weighs 75 pounds, stands about 24-in. high. 
Westinghouse semiconductor dept. gen. mgr. D. W. Gunther 
says that thermoelectric units with ratings of 5-to-500 
watts are also available. 

Experimental space-test authorization granted by FCC 
to ITT Federal Labs will permit the use of 2120 me or 
2299.5 me to bounce signals off the moon & passive satel- 
lites. The Commission asked ITT to conduct measure- 
ments to help determine whether such transmissions would 
interfere with ground-based microwave fixed stations. 
After July 1, only 2299.5 me may be used. 

Navy experiments with ducts — the region between dry 
& wet air layers — recently produced 2,600-mile transmis- 
sions on 220 & 445 me. Using aircraft, Navy engineers 
achieved California-Hawaii transmissions through ducts 
which ranged from 1,000 to 7,000 ft. above ground. They 
said too little is known about duct transmission to tell if 
reliable or year-round use of the technique is possible. 

Report on Russian video-tape recorder, 9 pages, has 
been translated and is available for 50^ from Commerce 
Dept.’s Office of Technical Services. Among other reports 
available: Television: Radio-Relay Television Lines with 
R-GOO Equipment and the Country's First Color Stereo- 
scopic Television Installation — 24 pages, 75 <j-. 



IRE Convention Highlights: Top spot on the program at 

the 1961 IRE Convention March 20-23 in N.Y. will be oc- 
cupied by a panel session on new energy sources — such as 
thermoelectricity, magnetohydrodynamics, thermionic con- 
verters, fuel cells & solar energy. And, as usual, there’ll 
be something for each of the expected 70,000 attendees 
among the 275 papers & 850 exhibits at the Waldorf-As- 
toria Hotel & N.Y. Coliseum. 

A paper on an “improved video recording system” by 
Frank Gillette, General Precision Inc., may highlight the 
broadcasting sessions. In the advance program released 
recently, here are some highlight sessions of interest to 
engineers in broadcasting & consumer electronics: 

BROADCASTING (2 sessions)— Adolph B. Chamberlain, CBS-TV, & 
Clure Owen, ABC, chairmen. 

ABC Scan Converter — A. W. Malang, ABC. 

Minimizing the Effects of Vidicon Lag with a Broad-Band Delay 
Line — W. L. Hughes, Iowa State U. 

Improved Video Recording System — Frank Gillette, GPL 

Recent Advances in Vidicons — Martin Rome, Machlett Labs. 

Improved Loudness Indicator — J. L. Hathaway, NBC. 

VO A International Broadcasting System — E. T. Martin & George 
Jacobs, USIA. 

FCC Lab Observations of Precision Frequency Control of TV Sta- 
tions — E. W. Chapin, FCC. 

CBS Net Alert System for Network Signaling — A. A. Goldberg, A. 
Kaiser, G. D. Pollack, CBS Labs, & D. M. Vorhes, CBS Radio. 
BROADCAST & TV RECEIVERS— John F. Bell, Zenith, chairman. 

Midwest Program of Airborne TV Instruction — T. F. Juries, Purdue. 

TV for Regular Graduate Courses — Wayne B. Swift, U. of Wis. 

Subminiature Tubes for TV Tuners — T. E. Gausman, Sylvania. 

Horizontal Scan Non-Linearity in TV Receivers & the Saturable 
Reactor — H. W. Claypool, Westinghouse. 

ELECTROACOUSTICS — Philip B .Williams, Jensen Mfg. Co., chairman. 

Low-Noise Microphone Preamp — A. B. Bereskin, U. of Cincinnati. 

Transient Distortion in Loudspeakers — R. J. Larson & A. J. Ad- 
ducci. Jensen. 

Artificial Reverberation Facilities for Auditoriums & Audio Systems 
— G. A. Brooks & R. L. Fisher, Westrex. 

MISCELLANEOUS PAPERS: 

Picture-Tube Improvement, through Controlled Environment & 
Ultrasonic Techniques — J. C. Halbrook, RCA (Product Engineering & 
Production session). 

Transistorizing the Industrial Image-Orthicon Camera — Richard W. 
Cook. Dage (Industrial Electronics Applications session). 

Analog Recording on Thermoplastic Film — W. C. Hughes, GE (Data 
Recording & Storage session). 



OVER-THE-COUNTER 
COMMON STOCK QUOTATIONS 

Thursday, January 19, 1961 
Electronics TV-Radios-Appliances Amusements 



The following quotations, obtained in part from the National /Isso- 
ciation of Securities Dealers Inc., do not represent actual transactions. 
They are intended as a guide to the approximate range within which 
these securities could have been bought or sold at time of compilation. 



Stock 


Bid Asked 


Stock 


Bid Asked 


Acoustica Associates _ 


19 


20% 


Magnetics Inc. 


7V4 


8% 


Aero vox 


8 


874 


Maxson (W.L.) 


10% 


11% 


Allied Radio _ 


22 


23% 


Meredith Pub. 


41% 


4474 


Astron Corp. 


174 


2% 


Metropolitan Bcstg. 


20% 


22% 


Baird Atomic 


2214 


24% 


Narda Microwave 


5% 


6% 


CGS Labs 


8% 


10 


Nuclear of Chicago 


38 V4 


42 


Cetron 


512 


6'/, 




2 7 / a 3 


-5/ 16 


Control Data Corp. 


6714 


71 


Pacific Automation - . 


474 


5% 


Cook Elec. 


14 


15 Vi 


Pacific Mercury 


6% 


7% 


Craig Systems . _ 


14 


15% 


Philips Lamp 


149' 4 


155 


Dictaphone 


34 V4 


37 Vi 


Pyramid Electric 


3 3-7/16 


Digitronics _ 


2114 


24% 


Radiation Inc. 


25% 


27% 


Eastern Ind. . 


15 Vi 


1614 


Howard W. Sams 


43 


47 


Eitel-McCullough 


16 s ! 


18% 


Sanders Associates 


38% 


41% 


Elco Corp. 


16 


17% 


Silicon Transistor _ __ 


4% 


5V4 


Electro Instruments _ 


26*4 


29% 


Soroban Engineering _ 


44 


47% 


Electro Voice _ 


9 


10 


Soundscriber _ 


15 Vx 


16% 


Erie Resistor _ 


ii % 


12 Vs 


Speer Carbon 


1914 


20% 


Executone _ 


20 


22 


Sprague Electric _ _ 


55 


58% 


Farrington Mfg. 


26*2 


2814 


Sterling TV 


1% 


1 % 


Foto-Video - - 2 


'4 3 


-11/16 


Taft Bcstg. _ _ _ 


12 % 


13% 


FXR 


36 


39% 


Taylor Instrument __ 


39 ’4 


42% 


General Devices - 


9 


10% 


Technology Inst. 


8% 


9% 


G-L Electronics - 


7% 


8% 


Telechrome _ _ 


12% 


13% 


Gross Telecasting 


20 '4 


2214 


Telecomputing _ 


7 


7% 




34 >4 


36% 


Telemeter 


10 % 







1/16 


Va. 


Time Inc. 


83 y 2 


87% 


Hewlett-Packard 


27 '4 


29% 


Tracerlab 


9% 


10 Vs 


High Voltage Eng. 


166 


178 


United Artists 


5% 


6*4 


Infrared Industries -- 


14 


15% 


United Control 


17% 


19% 


Interstate Engineering 


20' i 


:>2 


Universal Trans. 


% 1 


-5/16 


Itek 


51 


55 ' 


Vitro 


i3>; 


14% 




7 Va 


8 


Vocaline 


2% 3 


-3/16 


Lab for Electronics _ 


46 1 ; 




Wells-Gardner 


23 


24% 




4 *4 


5 1 




13% 


14 5 a 


Magna Theater 


2% 


3-5/16 









14 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



MANUFACTURING, DISTRIBUTION, FINANCE 



PHILCO AND MARKETING . . THE WORLD OVER': Revival of its old slogan, 

"Famous for Quality the World Over," seems particularly appropriate these days for Philco, whose wide- 
spread network of 18 foreign manufacturing subsidiaries, affiliates & licensees is doing a $ 100-million-plus 
business and selling more than 600,000 Philco & Bendix products a year overseas. 



The $100-million sales figure, reached in 1959 by Philco's overseas operations, is (for comparison 
purposes) a sum equal to more than a quarter of the total 1959 sales reported by parent Philco Corp. (but 
because Philco doesn't own all of its licensees, overseas operations don't contribute anywhere near this 
amount to Philco's gross). With 11 manufacturing subsidiaries — only 3 of them wholly owned — and 7 non- 
owned licensees, plus distribution in most of the world's market areas, Philco <& Bendix are trade names to be 
reckoned with almost anywhere in the free world. 



Behind Philco's worldwide expansion is Philco International's globe-circling president, Harvey 
Williams, who has turned his attention from world marketing of food products (as head of international oper- 
ations of H. J. Heinz Co.) to washing machines & refrigerators (Crosley-Bendix) and more lately to the most 
phonomenal consumer product of all — TV. 



Particularly intriguing to Williams is "the tre- 
mendous suck of TV." Pointing to charts prepared by 
Philco researchers, he explains: "Where people have a 
choice between reasonably-priced TV sets and refrig- 
erators or washers, they buy TV. The desire to own a 
TV set is phenomenal, compared with all other con- 
sumer hard goods — and wherever TV is introduced it 
goes up in saturation faster than any other major 
consumer durable product." 

Studying saturation curves in various coun- 
tries (right), Williams points out, astute marketers can 
find the same kind of opportunities overseas in non- 
saturated countries that existed in the early days of TV, 
refrigerators & washers in the U.S. He notes that TV 
sales curves seem to follow a definite pattern: While 
they ascend far more steeply than those of other con- 
sumer hard goods, they reach a peak, then drop and 
level off — as did U.S. TV sales after 1955. Great Britain, 
for example, is currently at the "hump" where the U.S. 
was during that all-time record sales year. 

Why foreign-market operations are necessary 
for the growth of large TV manufacturers is graphic- 
ally shown in Philco chart on opposite page. As TV 
expands worldwide, U.S. market becomes less signifi- 
cant in the over-all picture. Of an estimated 16.8 mil- 
lion TV sets sold in the free world last year, only 38% 
were sold in North America — down from 98% of the 
total 10 years ago. 



ESTIMATED TV SATURATION 
IN 12 KEY FOREIGN MARKETS 



PERCENT OF 




1950 1952 1954 1956 1958 I960 

YEAR 

PERCENT OF 
WIRED HOMES 




YEAR 



PERCENT OF 
WIRED HOMES 




PERCENT OF 
WIRED HOMES 

100 1 “T* 



90 



so- ASIA — 




VOL. 17: No. 4 



IS 



FREE WORLD TV SET SALES 
BY YEAR AND TRADE AREA 

MILLIONS OF 

UNITS 167 16-8 




Philco International's Harvey Williams , a 
leading expert on international trade and — perhaps 
equally important — on international public relations, 
makes his philosophy strongly felt throughout the com- 
pany's world organization. Among the keystones of 
Philco's world: (1) Local management & relative local 
autonomy in affiliate & licensee organizations. (2) Tech- 
nical, product design, engineering & management as- 
sistance from parent company to all affiliates — includ- 
ing licensees as well as subsidiaries. (3) Strong dis- 
tributor organizations, gained by making Philco-Bendix 
franchise as valuable as possible through providing 
broadest selection of goods from a variety of sources. 
(4) "An international point of view" toward marketing. 

This international viewpoint is best exempli- 
fied by Philco's recent announcement that it will test- 
market in the U.S. a line of radios & phonos made by 
its British licensee. Thorn Electrical Industries (Vol. 
16:49 pl9). These sets differ radically from Philco's 
U.S. line — most of the radios have shortwave bands — 
and Williams considers this non-competitive line a 
"specialty" in U.S. marketing. It wouldn't be econom- 
ical for Philco to tool up its U.S. production lines for the 
few thousand shortwave radios that might be sold here 
— but a few thousand extra can easily & profitably be 
turned out on British lines already set up for them. 



"An American industry that's intelligent is going to play this thing both ways," says Williams — 
imports as well as exports. "And remember," he adds, "any item must be profitable on the domestic market 
before it can be exported." 



"Business can't be run as an island," comments Williams. "You must always be looking around to see 
what you can take from one place and use elsewhere. If we make radios in England which can be specialty 
items here, we're foolish not to salt them into our line." Basically, however, each area has its own particular 
needs, and products must be tailored locally to fit those needs. "They don't need clock radios in Brazil— -but 
they do need a heavy-duty battery-operated 7-band 'coffee-grower' set for the isolated back country, and that 
kind of radio is one of our best sellers there. It's not chrome-plated, and it wouldn't be selective enough to 
play in the U.S., where we have so many stations — but it fills the bill perfectly in keeping rural Brazilians 
in touch with the world." 



In TV as in its other major products — radios, washers, refrigerators — Philco knows that local prefer- 
ence & custom are all-important. While American engineering advances are incorporated into foreign sets, 
the final say in this area — as well as in design, merchandising, advertising, etc. — is local. For example, a 
stunning advance-design set made by Philco Italiana — even more modern in appearance than the ill-fated 
Predicta — is a hit in Italy, but nothing like it has ever been introduced here. Another example: Britain's Thorn 
makes Philco TVs for export to Sweden — but they're put in Swedish-designed <£ built cabinets on arrival. 



• • • • 

Will imported TV ever be substantial factor on U.S. market? Williams thinks not, citing these barriers: 
Shipping costs, space, breakage, import duty per unit, American preference for American design. And per- 
haps biggest barrier of all is the increasing mechanization & automation of U.S. industry — made possible by 
huge production rims — which is putting this country in position to compete price-wise with imports. 

"We can compete with the Japanese now" on the transistor radio market, Williams believes — again 
citing large rims and automation as counterbalancing price advantages of cheaper foreign labor. Philco, 
incidentally, has no Japanese subsidiary or licensee, has never imported Japanese transistor radios. 



For more about Williams of Philco and his philosophy & practice of international trade, see p. 17. 



If. 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



6-FT. WALL TV PLANNED FOR APARTMENTS: Built-in "communication wall," pro- 

posed for each of 900 deluxe Chicago apartment units in late 1962, would contain stereo phono, AM-FM 
radio — and a 4 1 /2x6-ft. picture-on-the-wall TV. 

This is no Buck Rogers dream — all equipment is available, and negotiations are new under way 
among equipment supplier, architect & builder for installation of the wall with its huge TV in new section 
of a cooperative apartment development. 

Developer of the communication-wall idea is TelePrompTer Corp. The TV unit used would be the 
new projection system now in production by Dalto Electronics, Norwood, N.J., described on p. 12. Tele- 
PrompTer's communication-wall system envisions modification of the Dalto units for rear-screen projection, 
planting them inside the wall, with only the translucent screen showing on the wall. The same screen also 
could be used for home movies & slides. 

Dalto's unit makes possible practical home projection TV for the first time, we were told by Tele- 
PrompTer communications systems vp Nat C. Myers Jr., because of its simplified & inexpensive refractive 
optical system (which replaces complicated Schmidt systems used in other TV projectors). With a 4 1 /2x6-ft. 
rear-projection picture, Myers says, the highlight brightness of Dalto's TV picture is about 10 foot-lamberts 
— not as bright as direct-view TV, but adequate for daylight viewing. 

T elePrompTer hopes to lease the communication walls rather than sell them. Although price of the 
Dalto system is high for home use (list price $1,950), volume production presumably could bring costs down 
substantially. Myers, who requested that the name of the apartment development be withheld, estimates 
that the building will be ready for occupancy in 18 months to 2 years. Negotiations are now in the serious 
stage, he says, and TelePrompTer hopes to install communication walls in all 900 apartments. 

Even if the proposed deal falls through, the Dalto-TelePrompTer development seems certain ta 
revive serious talk about projection TV for the home — for the first time in more than 10 years. And at the 
very least, Dalto's development of low-cost portable projection TV seems to have strong implications in the 
school, institutional, military & hotel fields. 

• • • • 

Note: EIA 's weekly TV-radio production statistics , usually carried in this space, were not available 

as we went to press, because of the Inauguration Day holiday in Washington (where EIA headquarters are 
located). A summary of 2 weeks' production figures will be carried in next week's issue. 



NARDA— ‘SNOWBALL’ & NIPPON: Japan’s competition 

& Coming’s “Operation Snowball” represented most 
of the excitement at the National Appliance & Radio- 
TV Dealers Assn, convention in Chicago Jan. 13-15. 
Coming’s industry-wide program for spurring TV 
sales won the endorsement of NARDA’s executive com- 
mittee. And Nippon manufacturers received the latest 
in a series of blasts from Admiral Pres. Ross Siragusa, 
who doubled as the convention keynoter. 

In his address, titled “A Look Ahead for the Elec- 
tronic-Appliance Industry,” Siragusa made these forecasts 
for 1961 : “In TV, I believe we will reach a plateau in the 
first half, with a gradual rise in the second. The industry 
should come very close to hitting 1960’s total of 5% million 
sets. The bright spots in TV are the increasing interest in 
combinations & a higher unit-dollar sale. 

“Color is another very bright spot, increasing 35% in 
sales this year. We expect to do even better in 1961. And 
remember, one color sale is equal to 2% b&w sales. 

“In stereo, we look for the same leveling in the first 
half & a climb in the 2nd, to repeat 1960’s 4% million units. 

“It is expected that the radio sales boom will continue 
at its present levels. This year we should set an all-time 
record in FM sales. Total home radio sales are expected to - 
exceed the 11-million figure.” 

The appliance picture, Siragusa said, has brightened, 



and the outlook is for an industry sales rise this year. “We 
at Admiral have backed this outlook with our new appli- 
ance line that represents $8 million in tooling costs alone,” 
he noted, adding: “This sales rise will occur in a more 
stable climate, with newer, fresher products & firmer pric- 
ing across the board.” 

Having done with forecasting sales, Siragusa sailed 
into “cheap-labor foreign competition.” Stressing Ad- 
miral’s 2-year fight to blunt foreign-product invasions, he 
declared: “Admiral’s campaign to promote our products 
as ‘Made in America, by American craftsmen, with Ameri- 
can quality components,’ has finally won the support of 
official industry associations. Both EIA & NEMA recently 
announced they will wholeheartedly support our program 
. . . I propose that NARDA join EIA & NEMA in sup- 
porting these measures & actively promoting the ‘Buy 
American, Sell American’ program.” 

U.S. imports of Japanese radios with 3 or more tran- 
sistors increased 10% in 1960 from 1959 to some 4.5 million 
units, he pointed out, adding: “Our exports to Japan are 
primarily in coal, cotton, ■wheat, soybeans and the like. 
These are basic raw materials that help sustain only 100,- 
000 American jobs. On the other hand, Japanese exports to 
this country are finished products & components that elim- 
inated half a million American jobs . . . Latest figures 
show an estimated loss of 60,000 jobs in the electronics 
industry alone.” — 



VOL. 17: No. 4 



17 



The “Operation Snowball’ program was outlined by 
Corning ad & sales promotion mgr. Joseph S. DeMaio. With 
NARDA’s endorsement will come a special committee, to 
be named by newly elected Pres. Victor P. Joemdt, charged 
with working with Corning on means for implementing 
“Snowball” at the point-of-sale level. 

* * * 

Japan’s threat to U.S. electronics is spelled out by El A 
exec, vp James D. Secrest in the January (& premiere) 
issue of the new NARDA Neivs, which has changed from 
a weekly to a monthly. “The time has come when Congress 
& the executive branch of the federal govt, must give 
serious consideration to the development of reasonable & 
effective import controls,” warns Secrest, adding: “Failure 
to act now, we believe, cannot fail to bring the U.S. elec- 
tronics industry down the road of drastically shrinking 
sales & massive employment . cutbacks that has already 
been followed by the watch, plywood, fabricated steel, and 
other industries hard hit by imports.” 

* * * 

Boycott of Japanese TV-radio parts has been voted by 
IBEW Local 1031, whose 23,000 members are employed in 
137 TV-radio-electronics plants in the Chicago area. The 
local has notified employers that its membership will not 
handle foreign-made parts after May 1. A spokesman says 
that the local’s membership has declined from 47,000 in 
the past 2 years, that in the last 6 months alone 5,700 mem- 
bers have lost their jobs because of imports. The local’s 
action won the immediate support of the Electronic Parts 
& Equipment Mfrs. Assn. 

* * * 

Japan imports electronic brain: Tokyo Electric Power 
has ordered a $2-million Univac from Remington Rand. 



Japanese TV-Radio Output: Production of TV sets in 

Japan in 1960 is estimated at more than 3,360,000 units — 
up from 2,873,000 in 1959 — while radio output totaled about 
11 million, compared with 10 million sets in 1959. 

Last year’s output brings total TV sets produced in 
Japan since the start of telecasting there in 1953 to about 
8,530,000. The average retail price per set has declined to 
$118 now from $340 in 1953. 

Japan’s Economic Planning Agency predicts domestic 
sale of nearly 2 million sets a year for the next 10 years, 
with a total of 22.5 million sets in use by 1970. 

Japanese TV manufacturers are having problems with 
newly introduced & high-priced TV sets. Both color & 
transistor portable sets have failed to gain volume sales. 
Nevertheless, several manufacturers have announced plans 
for larger-scale output in an attempt to cut prices. Toshiba 
says it plans to produce 1,000 color sets (17-in.) a month in 
its new color-TV plant; Hitachi, Matsushita & Mitsubishi 
each has announced that its monthly color-set output will 
be stepped up to 500 sets. Prices of 17-in. sets currently 
run $l,115-to-$l,254. Sony, meanwhile, has dropped its 8-in. 
transistor portable TV and is producing a 14-in. model. 

* * * 

Export check prices of Japanese transistor radios may 
be discontinued in March, pending the outcome of an inves- 
tigation by the Ministry of International Trade & Industry 
(MITI). The present check price (floor price) for a 6- 
transistor pocket radio is $11, but actual going prices are 
$8-9. “Current price movements,” according to reports from 
Tokyo, “indicate that the quota system is operating effi- 
ciently enough to hold market prices at their present level.” 



More about 

PHILCO & THE WORLD: At 60, spry, athletic Harvey 

Williams, president of Philco International Corp., is 
conducting a world-wide sales campaign among Philco 
affiliates & foreign distributors themed (coincidentally 
or not) to the slogan, “Success in the Sixites.” 

Elaborating for us on his own formula for success in 
world-trading of consumer heavy goods (see p. 14), he out- 
lined these basic facts of life in international commerce: 

The world is made up of 100 to 120 basic markets, 
depending on the definition of a market. Less than 20 
markets can afford their own manufacturing facilities for 
such heavy items as refrigerators or TV — which means 80 
must be supplied by imports. 

“If you need your own factories in 20 markets, you 
need darn good distributors in the other 80 or so.” But all 
80 don’t buy from the same source. “Madagascar may have 
more French francs than pounds or dollars, Portugal more 
pounds than francs, and so forth. The manufacturer in the 
foreign market must be able to supply from more than one 
source to meet the needs & capabilities of its distributors.” 

Exports come basically from 9 countries — 5 major 
manufacturing countries (U.S., U.K., Germany, France, 
Japan) and 4 lesser manufacturing countries (Belgium, 
Italy, Netherlands & Switzerland). Production in all 9 
exceeds pre-World War II levels, and each has an export- 
able surplus. Countries in the rest of the world don’t have 
exportable surpluses of consumer goods. Brazil, for ex- 
ample, makes consumer durables for the domestic market, 
but not in quantities to export at competitive prices. 

“We must analyze the needs of our distributors in the 
80 non-manufacturing countries to give them the oppor- 
tunity to penetrate their own markets to the greatest 
possible extent. To do this, we must offer them the broadest 
selection of goods, and give them the chance to buy in 2 or 
3 different currencies. In this way we are making the dis- 
tributor’s franchise really valuable.” 

Wholly Owned Subsidiaries vs. Licensees 

Then, adds Williams, “is the time to start out to get 
manufacturing sources.” In some cases, wholly owned 
subsidiaries are organized — but this puts complete respon- 
sibility for management & finance on the parent company 
(“How would you like to have to appoint 20 general man- 
agers, 20 sales managers and so forth?”). 

Alternative methods are licensing of non-owned com- 
panies (as in the case of Thorn of England) or setting up 
partially-owned firms (as Philco Italiana, established in 
1959 with Philco as biggest shareholder, but also with 
Italian & French ownership). A big advantage is local 
management, with intimate knowledge of the market, local 
govt. & national mores. 

Parent Philco Corp. provides many of the same 
services to its non-owned and partially-owned licensees as 
it does to its wholly owned subsidiaries: Technical & 

product-design information, engineering & management 
assistance. “We believe in strong team play. We give our 
affiliates the benefits of our experience in the U.S. We 
want to get thinking started . . . This worked in the U.S. 
Will it work here? How can it be modified for this 
market? . . . and so on.” 

Williams has been identified at the top echelons of 
business since 1928. One of the original organizers of Avco 
(then Aviation Co.) that year, he was on the board & exec, 
committee until 1933. He then moved to H. J. Heinz Co., 
whei’e he headed the giant food firm’s international opera- 
tions. In 1953, he returned to Avco and organized its 



18 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



international div., going to Philco in 1950 when that firm 
took over Avco’s Bendix line. 

* * * 

Philco ’s world domain, which Williams oversees, is 
complex. Here is a breakdown of its subsidiaries & licen- 
sees: Wholly owned subsidiaries of parent Philco Corp. 
(Philadelphia): Philco Corp. of Canada; Philco Radio e 
Televisao, Brazil; Philco Corp. S.A., Switzerland (non- 
manufacturing). Partially owned subsidiary of Philco 
Corp.: Philco S.A., Mexico. Wholly owned subsidiary of 
Philco Corp. of Switzerland (in turn wholly owned by 
Philco) : Philco International Ltd., (London. Licensees of 
Philco of Switzerland in which Philco has minority inter- 
ests: Philco Argentina; Bendix Home Appliances do Brazil; 
Industrias Nacionales de Enseres Electricos, Colombia; 
Bendix Home Appliances France; Philco Italiana; Cia. 
Mercantil Internacional, Mexico; Semiconductors Ltd., U.K. 
Licensees of Philco of Switzerland in which Philco has no 
financial interest: Kenig, Cazzaniga & Co., Argentina; 
Philco Chile; Sociedad de Industrias Electricas Nacionales, 
Chile; Charles Begg & Co., New Zealand; Fisher & Paykel 
Ltd., New Zealand; Bendix Home Appliances, U.K.; Thorn 
Electrical Industries, U.K. 

Speaking at a recent N.Y. Chamber of Commerce meet- 
ing, Philco’s Harvey Williams summed up his policies of 
public relations for U.S. firms doing business in foreign 
lands in these sentences: 

“We do not parade the United States before the 
nationals of other countries. We avoid being patronizing to 
the people of other nations. We try to practice Christian 
humility. True, we exert management influences internally, 
but externally we build up local programs, local companies 
and local personnel. We try to be constructive in terms of 
the local economy and sympathetic with & sensitive to its 
traditions, customs and way of life.” 



Transistor radios plus civil defense tie-in rewarded 
Purolator Products Inc. with plenty of free publicity mile- 
age and Sylvania with extra radio sales which may exceed 
100,000 units. With OCDM Dir. Leo A. Hoegh acting as a 
sort of public-spirited super-salesman, Purolator (“in con- 
junction with the OCDM”) is offering the 150,000 service 
stations of the U.S. a promotional package of 27 Purolator 
oil filters plus a Sylvania radio & battery for $49.95. By 
throwing in some civil defense posters and pointing out 
that the radios are marked with the Conelrad frequencies, 
Purolator was rewarded wnth: (1) A letter from Hoegh to 
all service-station operators urging them to buy the pack- 
age to help do their part “in safeguarding American homes 
in the event of enemy nuclear attack.” (2) Pledge of co- 
operation from “nearly every major oil company.” 

Transistor agreement signed by Texas Instruments 
and ITT provides for an exchange of non-exclusive patent 
licenses & technical information on semiconductor com- 
ponents. A joint announcement stated that “Texas Instru- 
ments will also supply a portion of ITT’s needs for semi- 
conductor devices & components.” TI Pres. P. E. Haggerty 
stated that the pact “provides us with important business, 
especially for our plant in England and our new plant in 
France as well as access to the latest technical require- 
ments of systems development.” ITT Pres. H. S. Geneen 
hailed the agreement as providing “an assured source of 
high-quality semiconductor components & technical know- 
how” for his firm’s worldwide telecommunications & con- 
sumer electronics business. 



MONO SELLS, STEREO DULL: EIA’s retail phono-sales 
report for November shows business down in more 
ways than one: (1) Total unit sales of phonographs 
were nearly 18% below the Nov.-1959 level. (2) A 
large percentage of these sales appeared to be concen- 
trated in the extremely low-end price bracket repre- 
sented by monophonic phonos. 

The figures show that monophonic sales accounted for 
a full 40% of the unit total in Nov. 1960, as opposed to 
28% in Nov. 1959. While Nov. 1960 showed the year’s 
highest monthly sales of mono units, the figure was still 
lower than Nov. 1959’s mono sales. Stereo sales in Nov. 
1960 were nearly 44% below Nov. 1960. 

The stereo-to-mono ratio for 1960’s first 11 months 
contrasts sharply with Nov.’s percentage. Stereo sales 
constituted more than 72% of the retail sales units vs. 60% 
for the first 11 months of 1959. Total phono sales declines, 
particularly in October (down 19% from year-before) & 
November, practically wiped out 1960’s lead over 1959. 
Eleven-month retail sales were just 2% ahead of ’59. 

Factory phono sales for November (the highest in any 
1960 month) indicated a pre-Christmas buildup, but they 
were lower than the corresponding 1959 month for only the 
2nd time in 1959 (first time was October). Nevertheless, 
total 11-month factory phono sales outpaced retail sales by 
a little more than 12%. EIA phono sales statistics: 

PHONO FACTORY SALES 

I960 1959 



Month Mono Stereo Total Mono Stereo Total 

January 118,400 341,329 459,729 184,147 177,336 361,483 

February 92,649 324,666 417,316 164,873 188,760 353,623 

March 63,264 242,623 305,787 119,075 168,117 287,192 

April 30,962 142,409 173,371 47,153 126,111 172,264 

May 36,793 146,176 182,962 33,366 89,827 123,183 

June 69,293 198,407 267,700 44,976 152,900 197,876 

July 70,992 222,659 293,561 44,691 168,668 203,269 

August 109,321 307,517 410,838 65,179 277,545 342,724 

September 146,997 384,289 531,286 102,399 377.785 480,184 

October 143,160 391,821 614,980 139,679 456,471 696,050 

November 177,786 343,006 520,792 167,879 455,582 623,461 



TOTAL ...1.059,617 3,044,702 4,104,319 1,113,207 2,628,092 3,741,299 

PHONO RETAIL SALES 

1960 1959 

Month Mono Stereo Total Mono Stereo Total 

January 150,688 368,964 449,923 231,429 169,214 390,643 

February 102,063 347,860 448,128 171,127 156,477 327,604 

March 61,249 249,497 310,746 139,677 140,076 279,662 

April 41,503 152,141 193,644 94,226 118,197 212,423 

May 39,734 141,080 180,814 70,228 82,765 152,993 

June 44,925 166,339 210,264 66,979 100,982 167,961 

July 68,787 180,949 239,736 82,742 124,979 207.721 

August 79,364 267,681 336,945 98,132 198,926 297,058 

September 115,863 264,636 380,499 132,686 257,857 390,543 

October 126,807 272,101 398,908 162,248 343.428 495.676 

November 174,801 263,182 437,983 183,774 469,048 652,822 



TOTAL 995,784 2,663,330 3,659,124 1,423,148 2,151,948 3,575,096 



Anti-trust indictment has been filed by a federal grand 
jury in Dayton, O., against International Resistance Co., 3 
other manufacturers and 2 individuals, alleging that they 
conspired to fix prices of composition electrical resistors 
used in TV, radio and other communications equipment. 
Named with International Resistance in the charges — 
which could result in one-year prison sentences and/or 
$50,000 fines — were Allen-Bradley Co., Stackpole Carbon 
Co., Speer Carbon Co., Allen-Bradley sales mgr. George W. 
Vater and Speer Carbon marketing vp Edward W. Butler. 
The indictment alleged that the defendants started in 1955 
to maintain uniform prices for resistors packaged for 
commercial & military customers. Their sales in 1959 
alone totaled $43 million, the grand jury said. Filed at same 
time by Justice Dept, was a civil suit seeking a federal 
court injunction against any collusive practices. 



VOL. 17: No. 4 



19 



Trade Personals: Victor J. Joerndt elected NARDA pres., 

succeeding Carroll D. McMullin; McMullin replaces Joerndt 
as treas.; Gail K. Pinkstaff resigns April 15 as NARDA 
exec, vp . . . Harold W. Schaefer promoted from vp-gen. 
mgr., appliance planning & product development, to vp- 
engineering dir., Philco consumer products div. . . . Pat A. 
Calobrisi appointed product planning mgr., Motorola con- 
sumer products div., succeeding K. Warren Snider, reas- 
signed to a special assignment on the West Coast. 

John A. Mayberry, ex-Sylvania, named merchandising 
mgr., CBS Electronics distributor sales . . . William H. 
Rous named international operations vp, Amphenol-Borg 
. . . Walter H. Powell, industrial relations vp, International 
Resistance Co., named also operations vp . . . Robert F. 
Stewart appointed mktg. vp, Gabriel Electronics; David 
Fales III, ex-Martin Co., named chief engineer. 

Herman R. Henken, ex ad mgr., RCA industrial elec- 
tronic products, named ad & sales promotion mgr., RCA 
electronic data processing div. . . . Douglas C. Lynch, RCA 
International pres. & managing dir., named also a dir. of 
RCA Victor Co., Canada . . . David J. Gardam appointed 
plant personnel mgr., RCA electron tube div., Marion, Ind., 
succeeding Paul Thompson, now plant personnel mgr., RCA 
electronic data processing div., Palm Beach, Fla. 

Harold J. Schulman, promoted from mktg. mgr. of 
sound products and Knight-Kits to vp & gen. mgr., Knight 
Electronics Corp., Allied Radio wholly-owned subsidiary 
. . . Henry Feldmann, FXR founder & ehmn., resumes com- 
pany presidency, succeeding Tore N. Anderson, resigned 
. . . Frank A. Gunther, former exec, vp-gen. mgr., elected 
pres, of Radio Engineering Labs. 

Charles A. Tepper appointed vice-chmn., Industro 
Transistor, succeeded as pres, by Ira R. Becker, promoted 
from secy.-treas.; Tepper named also chmn. of subsidiary 
Poly-Chem Materials Corp . . . Edwin L. Davis named to 
new post of industrial & military products sales mgr., GE 
receiving tube dept. . . . Robert V. Jordan named to new 
post of product mgr., microwave devices, Sylvania electronic 
tube div.; William J. Peterson appointed product mgr., 
receiving & cathode-ray tubes. John Spitzer appointed ad 
& sales promotion mgr., Sylvania semiconductors. 

Phillip L. Gundy, Ampex Corp., has been elected pres- 
ident of Western Electronics Mfrs. Assn. New vps are 
Arthur N. Curtiss, RCA; Kenneth C. Stone, Kinetics Corp.; 
William C. Webber, Tektronix; Burgess Dempster, Elec- 
tronic Engineering Co. Emmet C. Cameron, Varian Associ- 
ates, is the new secy.-treas. 

Stuart L. Bailey, pres, of Jansky & Bailey Inc., was 
elected IRE treas., succeeding the late Dr. W. R. G. Baker. 
Re-elected were Secy. Haraden Pratt, Editor Ferdinand 
Hamburger Jr. and Dirs. Alfred N. Goldsmith & Patrick E. 
Haggerty. Elected new dir. was Motorola’s D. E. Noble. 



Most TV manufacturers will get into color “within 
the next 2 or 3 years,” RCA Chmn. Brig. Gen. David Sar- 
noff said last week. The General’s statement was released 
by RCA in the form of a correction to an interview with 
him by Marie Torre in Jan. 19 N.Y. Herald Tribune. Miss 
Torre’s account of the interview caused some raised eye- 
brows in the industry by stating that Gen. Sarnoff “offered 
the educated opinion that there’ll be color TV in almost 
every American home within 2 years, 3 at the most.” Said 
Gen. Sarnoff’s subsequent statement: “This is incorrect.” 
He said his comment had been in answer to the question, 
“When did I think most other manufacturers in the elec- 
tronics industry would be in the color-TV business?” 



Finance 

Mergers & acquisitions: Ling-Temco Electronics has 
acquired San Antonio-based Ed Friedrich Inc. and Fried- 
rich Refrigeration Inc. in a “multi-million-dollar cash 
transaction.” The 2 Friedrich companies make & market 
air conditioning & refrigeration equipment. Ling-Temco 
also reports that it has obtained “a strong position of 
ownership” in Chance Vought. Indications are that Ling- 
Temco has acquired at least 10% and possibly up to 40% 
of the Dallas-based aircraft-electronics-trailers firm’s 
1,189,390 shares • Westinghouse has purchased Teletronic 
Systems Corp., TelAutograph’s 80%-owned subsidiary, for 
$600,000 cash. Teletronic makes electronic consoles for use 
in plant security systems. Its employes own the other 20% 
of stock • Lynch Corp. (Symphonic Electronic) is nego- 
tiating to purchase “a leading manufacturer of instrumen- 
tation & test equipment” whose stock is listed on a major 
exchange. The acquisition, via a stock exchange, is ex- 
pected to be completed by mid-February • Fairchild 
Camera & Instrument has purchased Pacific Mercury 
Electronics’ Joplin, Mo. cable production plant. The cash 
transaction includes production equipment & materials. 

Trading in 16 Japanese securities, including those of 5 
leading electronics corporations, will be made simpler 
through a move just taken by the Japanese Finance Minis- 
try. The Ministry last week approved plans for 4 U.S. 
banks to issue American Depository Receipts (ADRs) 
representing shares in the companies. ADRs are certifi- 
cates that represent the deposit of foreign shares in cor- 
respondent banks overseas; in addition to handling the 
ADRs, the issuing banks handle collection of dividends and 
their exchange into dollars. Morgan Guaranty Trust Co., 
N.Y., has filed registration statements with SEC for hand- 
ling ADRs of 5 major Japanese companies, including Sony 
Corp., Toshiba and Hitachi. Irving Trust Co., N.Y., will 
also handle Hitachi, Nippon Electric and 3 other firms. 

SEC case echo: Pres. Morton Carlin of Judson Com- 
mercial Corp., N.Y. factoring firm which was involved in 
SEC cases against Skiatron Electronics & TV and ex-MBS 
Pres. Alexander L. Guterma’s operations with F. L. Jacobs 
Co. stock, has been charged with grand larceny. N.Y. 
District Attorney Frank S. Hogan announced Carlin’s 
arrest on a grand jury indictment alleging that he swindled 
7 customers out of $1.3 million by misusing stock they 
pledged with the Judson firm as collateral against loans. 

Progress Webster Electronics Corp., Chester, Pa. man- 
ufacturer of electronic components, plans public sale of 
150,000 common stock shares at $4.50 per share through 
underwriters headed by Marron, Sloss & Co. Inc. An SEC 
registration statement (File 2-17468) said that the proceeds 
would be added to working capital. 

ITT has sold for “more than $12 million” a portion of 
its holdings in Nippon Electric Co. Ltd. of Japan. The 
sale, which reduced ITT’s working interest to 15% from 
22%, was made to Japanese interests headed by the Daiwa 
Securities Co. and the Sumitomo group. ITT continues to 
be a principal stockholder of Nippon Electric, Japan’s 
largest manufacturer of telecommunications equipment. 
ITT’s association with Nippon Electric dates from 1899. 

MGM has registered 157,579 common stock shares with 
SEC (File 2-17457) for use in stock-option plans. The 
registration statement said 126,100 shares were reserved 
for issuance under outstanding options, and that the rest 
already had been issued to executive officers. 



20 



JANUARY 23, 1961 



Financial Reports of TV-Electronics Companies 

These are latest reports as obtained daring; the last week. Dash indicates the information was not available at press time. Parentheses denote loss. 



Company 


Period 


Sales 


Pre-Tax 

Earnings 


American Electronic Labs 


1960 — year to Nov. 30 
1959 — year to Nov. 30 


$ 2,691,419 

1,999,091 




Beckman Instruments 


1960 — 6 mo. to Dec. 31 1 
1959 — 6 mo. to Dec. 31 


31,300,000 

25,442,965 




Electronic Assistance 


1960 — 9 mo. to Oct. 31 

1959 — 9 mo. to Oct. 31 

1960 — qtr. to Oct. 31 
1959 — qtr. to Oct. 31 


3,139,897 

232,595 

999,955 

100,003 




IBM 


I960 — year to Dec. 31 1 
1959 — year to Dec. 31 


1,436,053, 085" 
1,309,788,037 




Loral Electronics 


1960 — 9 mo. to Dec. 31 1 
1959 — 9 mo. to Dec. 31 


27,000,000 

10,553,469 




Howard W. Sams 


1960 — 6 mo. to Dec. 31 
1959 — 6 mo. to Dec. 31 


4,891,092 

4,815,122 





Net Earnings 


Per 

Common 

Share 


Common 

Shares 


$ 73,127 


$0.73 




53,297 


.53 




1,550,000 


1.12 


1,381,223 


1,262,172 


.93 


1,363,094 


183,859 


.31“ 


584,004 


(2,923) 




500,000 


44,453 


.08“ 


584,004 


8,921 


.02“ 


500,000 


168,180,880“ 


9.18 


18,310,954 


145,633,212 


7.97 


18,268,943 


950,000 


.55 


1,740,444 


379,053 


.22* 


1,740,444' 


359,020 


.84 


425,450 


299,112 


.70 


425,450 



Notes: 'Preliminary. -After preferred dividends. 3 Record. 'Adjusted for July-1960 5% stock dividend and Oct.-1960 3-for-l stock split. 



Officers-&-DirectorS stock transactions as reported to SEC 
for December : 

Allied Artists. Albert Zugsmith bought GOO, held 171,500. 

AB-PT. James G. Riddell sold 100, held 1,500. 

American Electronics. Charles L. Jones sold 200, held 500. 

Ampex. Herbert L. Brown bought 750, held 2,673. Thomas L. Tag- 
gart bought 1,500, held 4,470. 

Amphenol-Borg. C. Marshall Borg exercised option to buy 400, 
held 1,066 personally, 2,666 in trust, 23,000 in estate. Harold R. Egenes 
exercised option to buy 1,000, held 2,033. 

Arvin Industries. Eldo H. Stonecipher bought 300, held 2,425. 

Avco. John Mihalic Jr. exercised option to buy 1,000, held 7,300. 

Belock Instr. Harry D. Belock sold 2,000 in private sale, held 221,496. 

Capital Cities Bcstg. Lowell J. Thomas sold 3,200, held 164,767. 

Cinerama. Nicholas Reisini bought 6,800 through Robin Interna- 
tional, held 94,460 in Robin International, 350,000 personally. 

Collins Radio. H. V. Gaskill sold 600, held 822. 

Corning Glass. William H .Armistead exercised option to buy 1,000, 
held 2,000. Paul T. Clark exercised option to buy 576, held 2,500. Wil- 
liam C. Decker exercised option to buy 4,000, held 18,937. R. Lee Water- 
man sold 400, held 1,460. 

Daystrom. John W. McLaren bought 100, held 100. 

Decca Records. Albert A. Garthwaite sold 200, held 3,500. Harold 
I. Thorp sold 500, held 500. 

Desilu Productions. Edwin E. Holly bought 300, held 2,300. Milton 
A. Rudin bought 100, held 100 personally, 187 in partnership. 

Electronic Research. Max W. Shapiro sold 1,000, held none. 

Electronics Capital. L. J. Rice Jr. bought 500, held 3,500. David 
Salik bought 200, held 15,956. 

Electronics international Capital. Charles T. M. Collis bought 100, 
held 100. Charles E. Salik bought 2,100 through Fleetwood Securities and 
45 more through Salik & Co., held 2,100 in Fleetwood Securities, 45 in 
Salik & Co., 7,877 personally. 

Filmways. James C. Kellogg III sold 1,500, held 50. 

GE. John W. Belanger sold 500, held 17,068. Ralph J. Cordiner 
exercised option to buy 9,000, held 21,090. Hershner Cross exercised 
option to buy 480, held 913. Milton F. Kent bought 450, held 2,081. 
Harold A. Olson sold 2,000, held 2,327. Charles K. Rieger exercised 
option to buy 3,106, held 7,931. Willard H. Sahloff exercised option to 
buy 2,445, held 7,554. Charles V. Schelke sold 114, held 3,969. 

General Instrument. Herman Fialkov exercised option to buy 799, 
held 24,891. Louis Scadron sold 600, held 6,878. 

General Telephone & Electronics. Jacob B. Taylor exercised option 
to buy 760, held 2,695. Ralph D. Heusel sold 100, held 2,100. Walter G. 
Wright exercised option to buy 300, held 13,800. 

Globe-Union. Ralph W. Conway exercised option to buy 100, held 
2,450. John S. Owen bought 500, held 1,000. Remington H. Warner 
exercised option to buy 100, held 660 personally, 280 for wife. 

Hazeltine. James F. Harrigan bought 100, held 1,403. 

Lear. William P. Lear Jr. exercised option to buy 175, held 13,849. 

Ling-Temco Electronics. D. H. Byrd bought 3,800, held 76,803. 
Oswald G. Villard Jr. sold 1,600, held none. Lee D. Webster bought 400, 
held 1.000. 

Litton Industries. Charles R. Abrams Jr. sold 400, held 5,000. Roy 
L. Ash sold 1,000, held 118,489 personally, 2,460 as custodian, 14,178 in 
partnership. Lewis W. Howard received 307 in exchange for Triad 
Transformer Corp. stock, held 6,772. Fred R. Sullivan sold 1,000, held 
15,260. Charles B. Thornton transferred 7,400 from community property 
interest, held 284,246 personally, 31,191 in partnership. 

National Theatres & TV. W. J. Friedman bought 2,000, held 3,000. 

Oak Mfg. E. A. Carver bought 1,000, held 1,000. 

Philco. Gaylord P. Harnwell bought 286, held 1,000. 

Raytheon. N. B. Krim exercised option to buy 661, held 661. 

Thompson Ramo Wooldridge. A. T. Colwell exercised option to buy 
2,000. held 12.000. Harold L. George sold 1,000, held 28,035. 

Trans Lux. Harry Brandt bought 1,190 personally, 500 through 
Brapick Inc., 100 for foundations, held 164,090 personally, 4,000 in 
Brapick Inc., 34,280 in foundations, 17,000 for wife, 100 in Barvic The- 



atres, 200 in Marathon Pictures, 400 in Bilpam Corp., 400 in Pamela 
Amusement. 

Transitron Electronic. Charles Rimkus sold 139, held none. 

Tung-Sol. H. Merle Darling bought 207, held 4,062. George E. Hal- 
lett bought 100, held 1,540. 

Walt Disney Productions. W. H. Anderson bought 400, held 900. 
Lawrence E. Tryon bought 200, held 200. 

Webcor. Titus Haffa bought 61,540, held 66,790 personally, 57,304 
in joint tenancy. 

Westinghouse. J. H. Jewell exercised option to buy 5,260, held 5,260. 



Reports & comments available: International Resist- 
ance, review, Blair & Co., 20 Broad St., N.Y. 5 • Radio 
Shack, study, Granbery, Marache & Co., 67 Wall St., N.Y. 
5 • Multi-Amp Electronic, report, G. Everett Parks & Co., 
52 Broadway, N.Y. 4 • Standard Kollsman Industries, 
report, Eastman Dillon, Union Securities & Co., 15 Broad 
St., N.Y. 5 • Official Films, discussion, H. Hentz &Co., 72 
Wall St., N.Y. 5 • Gulton Industries, review, A. C. Allyn & 
Co., 122 S. La Salle St., Chicago 3 • General Tire & 
Rubber, memo, Auchincloss, Parker & Redpath, 2 Broadway, 
N.Y. 4 • Wilcox-Gay, report, Webber-Simpson & Co., 208 
S. La Salle St., Chicago 4 • Reeves Soundcraft, prospectus, 
Emanuel, Deetjen & Co., 120 Broadway, N.Y. 5. 

Columbia Pictures’ earnings in fiscal 1961’s 2nd quarter 
(ended Dec. 26) will top the $510,000 earned in the preced- 
ing quarter and the $307,000 of the year-ago period. First 
vp Leo Jaffe said that 2nd-quarter results will include part 
of the more than $11 million Columbia is to receive on its 
recent sale of post-1948 movies to TV (Vol. 16:49 p6). 

Pacific Industries has been listed for trading on the 
American Stock Exchange. Symbol: PI. 

Over-the-counter stock quotations will be found on p. 13. 



Common Stock Dividends 



Corporation 


Period 


Amt. 


Payable 


Stk. of 
Record 


Gross Telecstg 


Q 


$0.40 


Feb. 


10 


Jan. 25 


Gross Telecstg. “B”... 


Q 


.071/2 


Feb. 


10 


Jan. 25 


Paramount Pictures . . 


Q 


.50 


Mar. 


10 


Feb. 23 


Republic Corp 


Q 


.15 


Feb. 


15 


Feb. 3 


Rico Electronics 


Q 


.22 y 2 


Feb. 


24 


Feb. 3 


Taft Bcstg 


Q 


.10 


Mar. 


14 


Feb. 15 


Taft Bcstg 


Stk. 




Mar. 


14 


Feb. 15 


Thompson Ramo Woold. 


— 


.35 


Mar. 


15 


Feb. 28 




The authoritative service for executives in all branches of the television arts & industries 



SUMMARY-INDEX OF WEEK'S NEWS 



FCC 

FCC READY TO WRAP UP ALLOCATIONS POLICY: All-channel 
receiver law, vhf-uhf simulcasting, ETV uhf reservation, removal 
of uhf assignment table, deintermixture (p. 1). 

COURT OKAYS FCC BOSTON CH. 5 ACTION, sends the case 
back for a new choice of winner among 3 applicants. WHDH-TV 
and Mass. Bay to suffer demerits (p. 3). 

FCC's "TRAFFICKING" PROPOSAL draws more station opposi- 
tion, all asserting that Commission has plenty of power now (p. 4). 

Programming 

ANOTHER TRIUMPH FOR TV is achieved by live coverage of 
President Kennedy's first news conference (p. 2). 

12 SHOWS EVICTED thus far this season. Believed to be a third 
of final total (p. 5). 

Auxiliary Services 

3 PAY-TV INSTALLATIONS PLANNED in U.S. by Telemeter, but 
"test case" before state agency may delay the wired system in 
Little Rock. TelePrompTer plans 2 systems (pp. 3 & 9). 

Congress 

SEC. 315 INQUIRY IS SET for 2 days of Senate hearings as the 
opening FCC-TV-radio event of the new Congressional session. 
Top industry brass is billed for the witness stand (p. 8). 

Film cS Tape 

OZZIE NELSON SIGNS with Writers Guild of America 3 days after 
their strike call against him (p. 10). 



Consumer Electronics 

LABOR DECLARES WAR on imports: IBEW local's boycott threat 
against Japanese components is likely to spread to other labor 
groups, influence negotiations, spur legislation (pp. 15 & 17). 
PITTSBURGH BONDED TUBE is being shown to set & tube manu- 
facturers, but new laminated picture-tube processes are too late 
for "1962 models," now frozen (p. 15). 

GOVT. PREDICTS RISE of 6% in electronic equipment output, 5% 
in components, in Commerce Dept.'s annual outlook (p. 16). 
ELECTRONICS EXPORTS ROSE 12% in 1960 to $450 million, 
exceeding imports by more than 4 to 1. Consumer-electronics 
exports dropped, however, Commerce Dept, says (p. 17). 

Finance 

EMERSON PROFIT-SALES SAG: Earnings dropped 41.5% on a 
5.5% decline in volume in the 1960 fiscal year (p. 19). 

Advertising 

RISING MEDIA COSTS are analyzed by Grey Advertising, which 
finds that it costs 20% more to maintain 1957's schedules (p. 7). 
TV GAINED 8% IN NOVEMBER while total national ad volume 
rose 4% from the year-earlier month (p. 7). 

Stations 

ARIZONA & OREGON ETV STATIONS START: KAET (Ch. 8) Phoe- 
nix and KOAP-TV (Ch. 10) begin Jan. 30. A review of vhf outlets 
that have left the air (p. 14). 

Other Departments 

TECHNOLOGY (p. 6.) FOREIGN (p. 9). NETWORKS (p. 12). 



FCC READY TO WRAP UP ALLOCATIONS POLICY: FCC continues to zero in on its 

proposed TV allocations policy — the most important problem in its domain. Very soon, the Commission 
will give Congress its recommendations. We've followed FCC thinking extremely closely, and major 
aspects have been foreshadowed here (Vol. 16:50 p2, 16:52 p2, 17:2 pi, etc.). It's understood that policy has 
almost congealed, and unless there's a totally unexpected reversal, here it is: 

(1) Legislation requiring that all sets shipped in interstate & foreign commerce be capable of receiv- 
ing all vhf & uhf channels — with FCC to be given authority to prescribe minimum performance. FCC is con- 
sidering telling Congress that such law is "of utmost importance to the national welfare." This shows how 
much steam is behind measure. 

(2) Uhf is asserted to be absolutely vital to a nationwide TV system, and it must be stimulated. 

(3) A pool of uhf channels will be set aside for existing vhf operators, who will be encouraged to 
telecast on both simultaneously. 

(4) A pool of uhf channels will be reserved for educators. 

(5) All other uhf channels will be available to newcomers on a first-come, first-served basis — to 
encourage fast applications for choice low channels, reduce or eliminate hearings for contested channels. 

(6) Vhf drop-ins, with short co- & adjacent-channel spacings, will be assigned to a few major markets 
— not more than 10. 



2 



JANUARY 30, 1961 



(7) Operating requirements for uhf stations will be relaxed — e. g., elimination of vestigial sideband 
filter, reduced power <£ height. 

(8) Uhf & vhf will be deintermixed wherever FCC believes public will gain more than it may lose. 

Some Commissioners, perhaps all, favor following language justifying recommendations: 

"Without the receiver legislation, the program will necessarily lose a large portion of its effective- 
ness. Certainly development of uhf stations will be retarded. In the face of the limited use of the large por- 
tion of uhf spectrum space now allocated to TV broadcasting, it may be necessary to surrender substantial 
portions for other pressing needs. The result will be the ultimate confinement of TV broadcasting to the 
wholly inadequate 12 channel vhf system. 

"It is clear that the 12 vhf channels do not provide adequate opportunities for growth to meet the 
demand of our expanding economy. Moreover, any attempts to squeeze in any substantial number of addi- 
tional vhf stations can only result in serious degradation of the quality of TV service to metropolitan areas, and 
virtual elimination of such service to many rural areas. Obviously, such a program could not provide an 
adequate solution to this problem. 

"Failure of the long-range program would handicap the nation with a limited TV system with inade- 
quate opportunities for local outlets & effective competition. We could expect the inequities & monopolistic 
elements in the present system to become magnified, and costs of sponsoring programs to significantly 
increase to the point where only the large advertisers can participate. This would be a result opposed to 
our national policy & desire for increased competition, and inevitably pressures will mount for the adoption 
of strong measures to overcome the shortages. This may include breakdowns in the technical standards to 
squeeze in more assignments in the vhf, and such regulatory measures as rationing of time on stations." 

ANOTHER TRIUMPH FOR TV: " The traditionalists of journalism , from an era when reporters 

clustered around a President's White House desk and exchanged sparkling repartee, can quit yearning. Live 
TV has become the new arm of Presidential communication with the public." 

TV's precedent-shattering achievement Jan. 25 in carrying President Kennedy's first news conference 
live to millions was underlined that way by UPI in its overnight lead from Washington. It reflected the gen- 
eral (but not unanimous) applause (however reluctant & rueful) from the press for all hands responsible for 
the New Frontier event which challenged the newspaper's pre-eminence as the White House news medium. 

"A solid hit," said UPI. "Altogether successful innovation for both govt. & TV," said Jack Gould in 
N.Y. Times. "Press conferences televised live are here to stay," Washington Post acknowledged, adding 
editorially that the first one "simultaneously met expectations & aroused high hopes." N.Y. Herald Tribune 
saw live TV making White House conferences "an important political instrument — perhaps more important 
than ever before." 

There were some press misgivings & dissents. "This new type of Presidential appearance, of course, 
is here to stay," Wall St. Journal editorialized. But it yearned — somewhat surprisingly — for the FDR days 
when there was "great flexibility" in White House conferences & less chance of Presidential slips-of-tongue 
getting out. Philadelphia Inquirer commented: "At a time when a wrong interpretation placed on a Presi- 
dential remark could set off an international crisis that would be hard to control later, it appears stupid to 
jeopardize our welfare just to furnish a good TV show." In some second thoughts on the subject, N. Y. 
Herald Tribune warned that televised conferences mustn't be occasions for "political propaganda." 

Such TV hazards were discounted by N.Y. Times editorial, however. It said "benefits are likely to 
be greater than the risks," concluded: "The nationally televised press conferences can be of tremendous 
service in bringing the govt, a little closer to the people." President Kennedy himself said "this system has 
the advantage of providing more direct communication." And his asst, press secy. Andrew Hatcher added: 
"So far as we are concerned, there will be many more televised press conferences." Frequency, he said, 
will be up to the networks themselves. Schedules for upcoming conferences will alternate regularly from 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., with evening sessions (such as the first one) planned for every 6 or 7 weeks. 

Net works' technical handling of initial 6 p.m. conference , which ran 39 minutes in the sparkling new 
auditorium of the State Dept. Bldg., 8 blocks from the White House, was nearly flawless. Crews worked from 
8 glassed-in broadcast booths. Newspapers gleefully played one bobble: ABC's John Edwards announced: 
"Now — President Eisenhower's press conference." (It had to happen to Hagerty.) 



VOL. 17: No. 5 



3 



TELEMETER PLANS 3 U.S. PAY SYSTEMS: Patterned after the pilot wired pay-TV 

system in Toronto area, 3 U.S. Telemeter installations are now in active planning stage, says Paramount's 
International Telemeter. It announced location of one — Little Rock, Ark. — but reports from Little Rock indi- 
cated the start may be delayed pending decision of a "test case" before the state Public Service Commission 
to determine whether the telephone company can be required to provide pay-TV cable service. 

Telemeter plans another system — in the N.Y. city area, possibly in Rego Park, Queens, which has 
been widely rumored as a Telemeter site. Location of 3rd new area hasn't been revealed. Meanwhile, Tele- 
PrompTer says it is planning 2 pilot wired pay-TV systems — in Liberal, Kan., and in Henry Kaiser's new 
Hawaii-Kai luxury housing development. 

Telemeter has teamed up with a powerhouse in the community-antenna business — Midwest Video 
Corp., which owns CATV systems in 8 communities — for the Little Rock project. Although it headquarters in 
Little Rock, Midwest currently has no CATV there. Exec, vp G. R. Morrell told us Midwest expects to carry 
the 3 Little Rock stations on its system in addition to 3 Telemeter channels. The Little Rock metropolitan area 
has 78,100 households. 

Midwest Video has asked Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. to install & maintain the Little Rock 
cable system as Canadian Bell Telephone System is doing in the Etobicoke, Ont., Telemeter installation. In 
its petition to Ark. Public Service Commission, Midwest said Bell had turned down the request. The com- 
plaint stated this constituted discrimination, and asked PSC to require Bell to establish rate schedule & pro- 
vide this type of service. 

Southwestern Bell vp-gen. mgr. Warren E. Bray denied his company had turned down Midwest's 
request. "This is a type of service we don't presently offer," he told us. "But we are in the communications 
business and we certainly plan to negotiate & study this open-mindedly." Nevertheless PSC member John 
R. Thompson foresaw "a battle of the titans" before his Commission. PSC rules permit other parties to inter- 
vene in proceedings, so it's not unreasonable to speculate that local TV stations & movie exhibitors may 
come forth to oppose Midwest's petition. (More about Telemeter-Midwest project on p. 9.) 

• • • • 

Test of TelePrompTer's "Key TV" system is slated to begin in late spring or early summer on the 
2,400-home TelePrompTer-owned CATV system in Liberal, Kan. Probability is that a few hundred homes on 
the system will get Key TV boxes for test. Unlike Telemeter's coin-in-the-slot system, the Key TV plan lets the 
viewer select his pay-TV program now, and pay later (Vol. 16:42 p7). The viewer choice is registered on tape 
at central hq, and he's billed at end of month, along with his regular CATV fee. TelePrompTer people are also 
enthusiastic about Key TV for ETV (push-button combinations permit viewers to take multiple-choice tests by 
TV) and for merchandising (push button to order merchandise displayed on TV). It's likely that both these 
non-pay-TV uses for Key TV will be tested in Liberal. TelePrompTer owns its own cables <& poles in Lib- 
eral, therefore is not dependent on the telephone company. 

Key TV will be used in super-deluxe Hawaii-Kai CATV system (which will be owned jointly by 
TelePrompTer & Kaiser Industries — Vol. 16:49 p24) to bring Honolulu stations to homes in the plush Hawaii- 
Kai development. The system will be wired for Key TV from the start, according to TelePrompTer officials. 
Underground cables will be laid at same time as homes are being built (first of the initial 2,000 homes will be 
started next spring). Eventual goal is city of 25,000 homes. A possibility being considered by Kaiser is built- 
in color TV in every home. 



The FCC 

Court Okays FCC Boston Ch. 5 Action: Court of Appeals, 

its ruffled feathers smoothed by FCC, gave the Commission 
what it wanted and put the Boston Ch. 5 “influence” case 
back into FCC’s hands. 

After the Commission last July 14 decided that 
WHDH-TV should lose its CP but be allowed another 
(though handicapped) crack at Ch. 5 along with its 
original 3 competitors, the Court decided that FCC had 
violated an earlier Court order to maintain the status quo 
(Vol. 16:29 pi, et seq .) . In last week’s ruling, the Court 



said that it is now satisfied with the Commission’s findings 
& recommendations to the Court. These findings, in brief, 
were that the CP to WHDH-TV should be set aside; 
that another comparison of applicants be made and Ch. 5 
be given to the best applicant; and that both WHDH-TV 
and Mass. Bay Telecasters be given demerits in the com- 
parison, because their principals attempted to influence 
FCC through the back door. The 3rd applicant is Greater 
Boston TV Corp.; a 4th, DuMont Labs, has dropped out. 

FCC’s next move isn’t certain, but it will probably 
ask each of the 3 competitors to file briefs supporting their 
cases, hold an oral argument, then issue a final CP. 



A 



JANUARY 30, 1961 



FCC’S ‘TRAFFICKING’ PROPOSAL: Surely few people 
care for FGC’s proposed rule to restrict sales of sta- 
tions held less than 3 years. More comments filed last 
week echoed the views of those submitted in the previ- 
ous week (Vol. 17 :4 pi). 

NAB, for one, asserted there’s “no magic in numbers,” 
and “we believe the imposition of a time limit as the 
determining factor as to whether or not a hearing should 
be held is both artificial & unnecessary.” NAB believes 
that FCC now has adequate power to deal with speculators. 

If FCC insists on “some rule-of-thumb,” NAB said 
in the comments submitted by counsel Douglas A. Anello, 
it ought to include more exceptions for when it would 
waive hearings. It suggested that these might include: 
Station operating consistently at a loss, and “assignments 
or transfers which are not pro forma as such but which 
would result in the continuity of service & policy by exist- 
ing management.” NAB also termed “very unrealistic” the 
FCC proposal to apply the 3-year rule to any station 
obtaining a major change in facilities. 

Storer Bcstg. Co. stated that the proposal would be 
“unworkable,” overloading FCC’s hearing processes & 
causing 18-to-24-month delays in transfer approvals. In 
addition, Storer said, “a transferor’s good faith & integrity 
would be placed in issue” when it was designated for hear- 
ing and its “staff would be demoralized, advertising sales & 
revenues would be damaged, programming would be 
impaired, and in most cases the transferor would be forced 
to withdraw his application to avoid complete disruption. ” 

Storer claimed that FCC has produced no facts to 
prove that trafficking has increased in recent years — and 
that Congress never intended a minimum holding period. 

Several other stations — including KHVH-TV Hono- 
lulu, radio WDNG Anniston, Ala. & WJOB Hammond, Ind. 
— suggested additional circumstances in which exceptions 
should be allowed. Among them: “Divorce settlements, 
gifts to children, basic unhappiness in living conditions in 
the community, complete dissatisfaction with the broadcast 
business, desire to settle issues of significance (such as 
the recent broadcaster-community antenna system contro- 
versy) , plans to expand & enter new markets.” 

Station broker James Blackburn, after stating that the 
rule wouldn’t affect his business much because most of his 
clients have held their stations more than 3 years, asserted 
that the “proposed amendment would change the whole 
nature of broadcasting, making it less attractive to owners, 
and reducing its ability to operate in the public interest.” 



Ethics in govt, agencies and legislation against con- 
flicts of interest will he subjected to another study in 
Washington. Asking for a report on the perennial problems 
by March 15, President Kennedy set up a special 3-man 
panel to recommend: (1) Measures “to ensure that all 

activities of the federal govt, are conducted with the 
highest possible standards of . ethics.” (2) “Approaches to 
strengthening the conflict of interest laws.” Panel members 
are retired Circuit Court Judge Calvert Magruder, U. of 
Pa. Law School Dean Jefferson B. Fordham, Yale Law 
School Prof. Bayless Manning. 

More short-termers: Radio WITT Lewishurg, Pa. & 
WKVA Lewiston, Pa. have been granted 15-month renewals. 
FCC stated that the authorizations were “with admonish- 
ment about previously indicated unauthorized transfer of 
control of WITT to WKVA, application for which was 
subsequently dismissed.” 



FCC Hits Reluctant Witnesses: FCC supported chief ex- 

aminer James Cunningham to the hilt last week, affirming 
his stand against the Hollywood witnesses who refused to 
produce testimony that the Commission wanted in the TV 
film hearings last October. As expected (Vol. 16:45 p5), the 
FCC voted to order the following to produce: MCA’s Taft 
Schreiber, Dick Fishell, Betty Langley, Mary Rothschild, 
Dick Fishell & Associates, Promotions Unlimited. 

MCA said it would go to court. It may go first to the 
Federal District Court in Los Angeles, then to Washing- 
ton’s Court of Appeals or even to the U.S. Supreme Court 
if it continues to lose along the line. It’s assumed that the 
Fishell group will do likewise. 

In last week’s order, the FCC directed the parties to 
appear at a time & place designated by Cunningham — and 
if they don’t, “an action to require their testimony [will] 
be instituted forthwith in the U.S. District Court.” 



FCC has again asserted that it has final jurisdiction 
over tall towers, but it buried its statement in the text of a 
recommendation to Congress for a minor amendment of the 
Communications Act. Asking Congress to give it authority 
to require adequate painting of towers no longer used for 
transmissions, the Commission said, in passing: “Further, 
the FCC is the federal agency which has final authority to 
authorize the construction of towers to be used as part of 
a licensed X’adio station ... In addition, the FAA, which is 
the federal agency having primary responsibility over the 
navigable airspace, recognized the FCC’s authority in the 
field of antenna towers.” To bear this out, FCC quoted from 
the Aug. 1950 FAA and Airspace, issued by FAA, which, 
referring to “radio or TV transmitting towers which may 
involve or create an aeronautical hazard,” stated: “The 
final action on these cases is taken by the FCC.” FCC also 
forwarded to Congress a recommendation that it amend 
the law to eliminate the requirement that applications be 
accompanied by an “oath or affirmation.” FCC believes its 
processes will be speeded and that other laws are adequate 
to cover false statements. 

FCC critic James M. Landis, President Kennedy’s 
special asst, for regulatory agencies, lit no new fires under 
the Commission in a Jan. 22 appearance on NBC-TV’s 
Meet the Press (see also p. 7). Questioned about the new 
administration’s plans to implement his scathing report on 
the agencies (Vol. 17:1 pi), Landis performed with more 
restraint than he had on Mike Wallace’s WNTA-TV N.Y. 
show Jan. 12. He said then that FCC should be able to 
raise the “tenor” of TV programming, that there’s “a lot 
to be said” for govt.-run networks (Vol. 17:3 p3). On Meet 
the Press Landis confined himself to such observations as: 
(1) It will be tough to get Congressional approval of 
agency reorganization plans. (2) It’s hard to draw legis- 
lative lines between proper & improper off-the-record 
approaches to agencies. (3) The Kennedy administration 
has “no desire to increase regulation for regulation’s sake.” 

(4) “New blood” will help the agencies operate better. 

(5) The biggest problem is disposing of case backlogs. 
Sen. Hart (D-Mich.) told the Senate later that the Meet 
the Press performance should demonstrate that Landis 
doesn’t want to “upset or erode the independence of the 
independent agencies.” Hart inserted the transcript of the 
show in Jan. 26 Congressional Record. 

Uhf translator CP granted: Ch. 73, Baker, Elgin, La 
Grande & Union, Ore., to Blue Mountain TV Assn., to 
translate KHQ-TV Spokane. 



VOL. 17: No. 5 



5 



Programming 

12 Shows Evicted: Eleven film series and one live show 

have l’eceived their eviction notices to date. This total is 
believed to represent less than a third of the total expected 
to be reached in the next few months — which is the prin- 
cipal reason why 200 pilots are being prepared (Vol. 17:3). 

Additions to the casualty list last week were 2 entries 
from Four Star Television — Dante (Howard Duff) and 
Peter Loves Mary (Peter Lind Hayes & Mary Healy) — 
which we learn will not be back next season. P&G has until 
April 17 to decide on renewal of the Hayes-Healy series, 
but in any event it’s doomed on NBC-TV. 

Previous TV film casualties were Dan Raven, Screen 
Jems; Riverboat, Revue Studios; The Westerner, Wanted 
— Dead or Alive and The Du Pont Show with June Ally son, 
all from Four Star ; The Garlund Touch, Paramount TV ; 
The Islanders, MGM-TV ;- Klondike, Ziv-UA; The Tab 
Hunter Show, Shunto Productions. The live casualty, 
Witness, is produced by David Susskind. 

A longtimer that is not returning — although not 
canceled — is Dick Powell’s Zane Grey Theater. Powell, 
instead, will host a new 60-min. anthology series on NBC- 
TV next season. The pace on buys for next fall hasn’t been 
as rapid as that of the casualties. Other purchases are 
The Freshman, a comedy, from Four Star; The Bob Cum- 
mings Show, a comedy, produced by Revue. Walt Disney’s 
Wonderful World in Color has been slotted for 7:30-8:30 
p.m. Sundays on NBC-TV next season. And NBC-TV is 
expected to schedule a 60-min. 20th Century-Fox TV 
newcomer, tentatively called Monte Carlo. 

* * * 

Casualty rate is rising for network nighttime TV 
programs, reports Jan. 23 Sponsor. Since 1955, a new 
Nielsen study shows, the number of new shows which 
returned the succeeding year declined annually (with the 
exception of 1957) from 55% in 1955 to 38% in 1959. In 
that .same period, the number of new shows increased 
annually from 42 to 50. Other findings: Single sponsorship 
of programs dropped to 27.8% in I960 from 49.6% in 1958. 
The nighttime schedule consumed by 30-min. shows declined 
in those 3 years to 49.3% from 65.1%; the 60-min. share 
increased to 45.8% from 32.6%. 



Dramatic programs, news & special events, and feature 
films won the largest percentages of viewer votes in a 
recent survey by Pulse Inc. for Television Age. Asked 
which categories should get more TV time in 1961 than 
they got in 1960, 500 N.Y. viewers requested more of these 
3 categories at the rates of 52.4%, 48% and 44% respec- 
tively. Another high scorer was comedy, which got 41.8%. 
The category which had the lowest score among viewer 
requests for more time was crime & mystery (15.2%). 
Asked which categories should get less time, 44.6% of the 
viewers awarded the scallion to that category. Only 3% of 
the respondents thought there should be less news & 
special events in 1961. Two-thirds thought they would 
spend the same amount of time watching TV in 1961 as 
they did in 1960; 17.2% said more time and 16.8% said less. 

Broadcast headlines thrown into 5-min. news shows 
don’t constitute responsible electronic journalism, NAB 
board member Allan Page, mgr. of radio KGWA Enid, 
Okla., told a 4-state TV-radio news clinic at U. of Kan. 
He said broadcasters should spurn news “gimmicks” & 
develop fewer stories, but in greater depth. 



Ratings & Program Mortality: While ratings may be the 

most important factor in deciding whether a show stays on 
the air or is canceled, they obviously don’t tell the whole 
story. As networks prepare for mid-season axings, Nielsen 
notes there is no absolute cut-off point in ratings, below 
which a show is dropped and above which it stays. 

The average rating of the approximately 50 shows can- 
celed at the end of 1959 was 13.9 (Vol. 16:51 plO), but a 
more detailed breakdown of the Nov.-Dee. 1959 AA ratings 
indicates that some low-rated shows are staying on the air 
(24% of those programs whose ratings were less than 15), 
while a few shows which rated between 22 & 30 were 
dropped. This table, prepared for us by Nielsen, indicates 
the percentage of programs returning in 1960 in each 



rating category: 






1959 AA Rating 


No. of Shows 


% Returned in 1960 


30 or more 


2 


100 


25-29.9 


15 


93 


22-24.9 


14 


93 


20-21.9 


13 


69 


15-19.9 


31 


63 


Under 15 


38 


24 


18.2 (average) 


113 (total) 


56% Returned 



Danger of TV censorship was seen last week by U.S. 
Supreme Court Chief Justice Warren, speaking for the 
dissenters in a 5-4 decision that upheld a Chicago ordinance 
giving the city authority to require its approval before a 
movie may be exhibited. The decision, Warren said (joined 
by Justices Douglas, Black & Brennan), “presents the real 
danger of eventual censorship for every form of communi- 
cation, be it newspapers, journals, books, magazines, TV, 
radio or public speeches.” The suit was brought to the 
Court by Times Film Corp., which had refused to submit 
its movie “Don Juan” for approval by city censors, who 
then refused to allow its exhibition. • In Hollywood, MPAA 
Pres. Eric Johnston strongly urged TV to join the movie 
industry in the fight against censorship, warning that TV, 
radio and other media will ultimately face censorship too 
if they don’t combat it now. The Supreme Court decision, 
he said, may be a “stimulation” to more censorship boards. 

Vatican guidance on TV shows is being published for 
Roman Catholics who view Italian programming. The 
guidance, “indicative” and considered not binding as in the 
case of film & theater judgments, comes from the Catholic 
TV Center of Italian Catholic Action. 

NBC International supplied 15 film hours of Inaugural- 
day coverage to 6 foreign countries (Holland, Denmark, 
Italy, Germany, Australia, Philippines). In a separate 
agreement, BBC was supplied with a special 30-min. film. 
CBS News Film subscribers in 30 countries were serviced 
with Inauguration day films, and Australian Bcstg. Corp. 
bought complete CBS kinescope. ABC radio supplied Voice 
of America with its audio coverage, but no foreign TV deals. 

TV “is here to stay” and it’s time for newspapermen to 
“lay down the sword” & accept the medium as an estab- 
lished news competitor, President Kennedy’s press secy. 
Pierre Salinger said Jan. 25. Addressing a National Press 
Club luncheon in Washington just befoi’e the President 
went before live TV network cameras for his first White 
House press conference (see p. 2). Salinger said the new 
arrangement didn’t mean TV was favored over newspapers. 

Block-booking injunction order will be filed by the 
Justice Department this week. A Jan. 26 conference at 
N.Y. federal court adjourned before completion of the 
action, which is based on the Dec. 2 decision by Judge 
Archie O. Dawson that TV sales of features in blocks are 
illegal (Vol. 16:50 p5). 



6 



JANUARY 30, 1961 



TV & radio cultural exchanges between the U.S. & 
USSR aren’t working out. Radio Moscow complained in a 
broadcast accusing American officials of reneging on 
pledges. The same situation prevails in exchanges of 
movies, the Russians said. In reply, the State Dept, put out 
a 3,000-word statement calling the broadcast a “totally 
unwarranted & insupportable attack.” Said the State Dept. : 
“Everyone knows that Soviet Premier Khrushchev has 
received liberal radio & TV time” here — more than any U.S. 
official ever got in Russia. Moreover, the U.S. reply said, 
packaged Russian TV & radio shows offered for U.S. 
programming haven’t been satisfactory. TV shows don’t 
meet U.S. technical standards and radio shows aren’t 
shipped in time to meet schedules, the State Dept, main- 
tained. As for movies, the State Dept, reminded the Rus- 
sians that 8 Soviet films have been purchased by U.S. 
theater exhibitors under the 1959 exchange agreement — 
and that they’ve had wide distribution & gala openings. 

Exploitational & commercial aspects of the present 
broadcast-journalism award system “negate the aims of the 
honoring organizations,” charged MBS Pres. Robert F. 
Hurleigh last week. He was addressing a symposium at 
the U. of Georgia Henry W. Grady School of Journalism 
conducted in association with the Ga. Bcstrs. Assn. Hur- 
leigh called for a procedure similar to that used for the 
Ayer typography awards to newspapers: Set aside 2 weeks 
in the year for entry submission, thus eliminating “spor- 
adic, award-seeking forays.” He also criticised award 
categories for “failing miserably” to keynote programming 
changes. Network development of daily world events 
documentaries is going “unrecognized & unsupported by 
the very groups priding themselves as the watchdogs of 
the media’s cultural, ethical & educational developments.” 

Winner of Montreux international TV festival (May 
15-27) may be seen by over 300 million televiewers. Rules 
of the contest, released Jan. 29, encourage competitors to 
telecast the winning musical or variety program over their 
outlets. Networks from some 35 nations, independent & 
govt.-owned members of the European Bcstg. Union which 
is endorsing the contest, are expected to take part in the 
Swiss-sponsored contest. The rules also specify the pay- 
ment of copyright dues which “could result in the payment 
of substantial sums to the company & artists who produce 
the Golden Rose winner.” Entries must be especially 
prepared for TV during the 12 preceding months. 

U.S. took top honors at the recently concluded 
international TV festival in Monaco, copping prizes for the 
best dramatic program (“Medea”), best non-dramatic 
(“Very Important People”) and best current events pro- 
gram (Yul Brynner’s “Rescue”). Other awards went to 
England’s Sir Laurence Olivier for his performance in 
the American “The Moon and Sixpence” & Argentina’s 
Violeta Antier for “Judith.” Japan’s Minao Joskida won 
the best direction prize for “Underground,” and Sosuke 
Pugi won the prize for the best writing of an original dra- 
matic work with “The Last 30 Minutes.” 

Flexibility of the NBC-Gulf Oil contract paid off Jan. 
24. In a matter of hours after the disappearance of the 
Portuguese ship Santa Maria, NBC went into action with a 
30-min. (10-10:30 p.m.) special, “Piracy in the Caribbean,” 
pre-empting the first half-hour of “Life in the 30s.” The 
Frank McGee-narrated summary of the event’s political 
implications included a reading of the radiogram sent to 
NBC by rebel leader Capt. Henrique Malta Galvao, audio 
pick-ups from Santa Lucia in the Windward Islands, and a 
report from a Washington-based naval officer. 



Early rating results for live telecasts of President Ken- 
nedy’s first news conference (see p. 2) came as a surprise to 
NBC-TV, which has become accustomed to a strong lead in 
political programming (the 1960 conventions, Election, 
Inauguration). In the 7-city Arbitron, which recorded 9 
million viewers for the 6-6:45 p.m. period, the CBS audience 
share of 12.9 had the edge over NBC’s 12.6. “We expect to 
pick up considerably in the national Nielsen,” an NBC 
official told us. According to the N.Y. Nielsen, WNBC-TV 
did only slightly better than the network in the multi-city 
area. It captured an audience share of 14.8 against a 12.4 
for WCBS-TV. The homes-using-TV figure for the 6-6:30 
p.m. period in N.Y. stood at 55.8 (2,315,000 homes) against 
the “normal” 43.1 for the time period. But NBC broke its 
own TV audience record Jan. 20. In the 29-market Trendex, 
the network scored a 50.4 share of the 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 
Inauguration Day viewers — against a 32.3 for CBS, reach- 
ing 28 million homes. (Huntley & Brinkley reached 27,- 
700,000 TV homes on Election night). 

Goldwater-McCarthy debate (Face the Nation, CBS- 
TV, Thu. Jan. 26, 10-11 p.m.) pulled a mere 5.0 against 
ABC-TV’s 23.8 for The Untouchables and NBC-TV’s 16.3 
for Groucho Marx, according to the ARB 7-city ratings. 

Special citation has been awarded to CBS-TV by the 
American Institute of Architects for “Big City — 1980,” 
the Nov. 21 program in the T omorrow series sponsored by 
American Machine & Foundry. Another CBS program at- 
tracting special notice is “Harvest of Shame,” the Nov. 25 
report on migratory workers (Vol. 17:4 p7). It is being 
shown to members of Congress this week (Jan. 30). 

Technology 

Satelite communications experiment for one year has 
been authorized to AT&T by the FCC which granted 6325- 
6425 me for tests of various kinds of transmissions, includ- 
ing TV. NASA will do the launching of up 'to 6 satellites, 
will be reimbursed at cost — estimated at $3 million each. 
Each earth station will cost about $106,000, satellites about 
$250,000. Ground stations will feed 3 kw into the antenna, 
satellites 5 watts. FCC has also turned down as “prema- 
ture” AT&T’s petition for the allocation of non-common- 
carrier frequencies 6425-6925 me to space communications. 
Lockheed Aircraft Corp. last week submitted to FCC a 
recommendation that it be permitted to become a “common 
carrier’s common carrier” — supplying satellite service to 
other earners. The presentation was made to a meeting of 
officials of FCC, NASA, OCDM & Congressional space 
committees. It was based on a big survey by the manage- 
ment firm of Booz, Allen & Hamilton and a legal analysis 
by Pierson, Ball & Dowd. Ex-FCC Chmn. John Doerfer is 
also associated with the project. The Lockheed position is 
that FCC is the only agency empowered to get the ball 
rolling now. Lockheed envisioned a porgram to cost $260 
million during a 6-year initial period, placing 2 satellites 
22,300 miles out in space and 20 stations on earth — 4 of 
them in the U.S. NASA last week invited bids by March 6 
on an 85-lb. active satellite — “Project Relay” — capable of 
carrying TV, multi-channel telegraphy and data handling, 
and due for launching in mid-1962. Specifications were out- 
lined to representatives of 41 industries last week. 

Digital TV, an encoding technique which offers poten- 
tial for closer station spacing, improved signal-noise levels, 
better fringe service, narrower bandwidth, etc., will be 
discussed & demonstrated in Washington Feb. 13 by Bureau 
of Standards under IRE auspices. 



VOL. 17: No. 5 



7 



Advertising 

Rising Media Costs: Today’s advertiser will have to spend 

20% more in real dollars just to maintain his 1957 schedule, 
concludes Grey Advertising in a study of cost trends during 
the past 4 years. Prime factors in the rising costs: inflation, 
changes in coverage, increased competitive pressures. Fol- 
lowing are Grey’s analyses of TV, magazines, newspapers: 

TV: A $100,000 network-TV schedule in 1957 cost 
$24,000 more in 1960. In that time span, although total 
U.S. households increased only 5%, TV saturation increased 
10% and the number of TV-owning homes jumped 15%. 
If 1960’s advertiser spent only what he did in 1957, he 
reached 12% fewer people and received no benefit from the 
population growth. 

Magazines: A $100,000 magazine ad schedule in 1957 
cost $27,000 more in 1960. In the intervening 4 years, 
magazine circulation increased 13% and the proportion of 
homes that bought magazines rose 8%. If the advertiser 
made no change in 1960 from his 1957 budget, he lost 15% 
of his previous market coverage. 

Newspapers: A $100,000 newspaper ad schedule in 
1957 cost $11,000 more last year, and failure to in- 
crease would have cost the advertiser 17% of his previous 
coverage. In the 4-year period, while U.S. households put 
on that 5% increase, the proportion of homes buying news- 
papers slumped 4%. (For another study, see Vol. 16:15 p7.) 



FTC’S Kintner Lauds Landis: Unexpected words of praise 

for President Kennedy’s regulatory-agency advisor James 
M. Landis came last week from Republican FTC Chmn. 
Earl W. Kintner, whose Commission was among those 
lambasted by the White House aide (Vol. 17:1 pi). 

Landis was absolutely right in pointing out “the crying 
need of the administrative agencies for effective personnel,” 
Kintner said in a 54-page FTC “Apologia” written for the 
anti-trust law section of the N.Y. State Bar Assn. 

“I support Mr. Landis’s views on this subject com- 
pletely, and I earnestly hope that the new administration 
will implement them without favor or reservation,” Kintner 
said. He added that the views of the Landis report “on the 
selection of agency members, and his brief for the centrali- 
zation of executive & administrative responsibility in the 
agency chairmen, strike most responsive chords with me.” 
Kintner had only mild criticism for another section of 
the Landis report which urged transfer of some of FTC’s 
anti-trust jurisdiction to the Justice Dept. This recom- 
mendation had been assailed earlier by Democratic FTC 
member William C. Kern as “inimical to the public inter- 
est” (Vol. 17:3 pl8). Kintner merely recorded his “respect- 
ful disagreement” with the Landis proposal. 

The lame-duck Republican chairman, who is awaiting 
replacement by a Kennedy appointee, also had some words 
of advice for his FTC successor: 

“The regeneration of agency policy must not be 
limited to the recruitment of new personnel. The enthus- 
iasm & imagination of veteran staff members, often dor- 
mant or repressed, must be kindled. Advancement for the 
meritorious must be sure & swift, and quiet harbors must 
be found for those who are exhausted or incompetent.” 
Another speaker at the N.Y. lawyers’ meeting was 
Landis himself. He conceded he had “stepped on some toes” 
in his report to President Kennedy, and that maybe it would 
be better to strengthen FTC than to take away any of its 
present functions. For one thing, Landis said, FTC needs 
more authority to stop “false & deceptive” TV advertising. 



Net TV Up 8% In Nov.: The total national ad volume 

rose only 4% in November above the Nov.-1959 level, 
despite healthy increases by outdoor (22%), newspapers 
(15%) and network TV (8%). These gains were whittled 
by magazines’ 5% & radio’s 4% declines, Printers’ Ink’s 
latest index shows. 

With the sole exception of radio — -down 1%— all major 
media showed cumulative gains. The leaders: TV & mag- 
azines (10% each), business (7%). Total year-to-date 
business ran 7% ahead of 1959’s Jan.-Nov. volume. 

Only TV & radio improved in November from Oct. 
1960, producing respective gains of 1% & 5%. Newspapers 
repeated the preceding month’s volume, and all other media 
showed losses, topped by magazines’ 16% decline. 

Index % Change from 





Nov. 


Nov. 


1 month 


1 year 


% Cumulative 


Medium 


1960 


1959 


ago 


ago 


Change 


General Index 


. 234 


224 


— 5 


+ 4 


+ 7 


Total Magazines 


. 175 


184 


—16 


— 5 


+10 


Weekly 


. 185 


200 


-24 


— 8 


+12 


Woman’s 


. 141 


142 


— 4 


— 1 


+ 9 


General Monthly ... 


. 231 


230 


— 4 




+ 8 


Farm 


91 


122 


+ 7 


—25 


— 9 


Newspapers 


. 202 


175 


+15 


+ 2 


Network Television . 


. 513 


476 


+ 1 


+ « 


+10 


Network Radio 


22 


23 


+ 5 


— 4 


— 1 


Business Papers 


. 244 


240 


— 1 


+ 2 


+ 7 


Outdoor 


. 166 


136 


— 2 


+22 


+ 5 



All indexes have been seasonably adjusted. The index shown for each 
medium is based on estimated total advertising investments in the 
medium, including talent, production and media costs. For each medium, 
the base 1100) is an average of total investments in the years 1947-1959 
except for the TV base, which covers the years 1950-52. 



“Guaranteed”-product advertisers should bone up on 
answers to 7 questions, according to FTC attorney George 
J. Luberda. Assigned to evaluate complaints pouring in 
from consumers who say they’ve been taken in by broadcast 
claims & print-media ads, Luberda drew up this list of 
questions for consumers to ask: (1) “Who is going to make 
good on the guarantee?” (2) “Does the product have to be 
returned to the seller?” (3) “Is the entire product 
guaranteed, or just those parts that rarely, if ever, wear 
out?” (4) “Who pays the labor charges involved in the 
product’s repair?” (5) “Is routine servicing covered by the 
guarantee?” (6) “Is the guarantee based cn the price you 
actually pay for the product or is it pro-rated on a manu- 
facturer’s ‘list’ or ‘suggested retail’ price?” (7) “Is the 
guarantee in writing or is it contained only in the sales- 
man’s smiling assurance?” 

New reps: KGUN-TV Tucson to Young Jan. 1 from 
Headlev-Reed ° WLOF-TV Orlando, Fla. to Young Jan. 1 
from Headley-Reed • WCIA Champaign, 111. to Peters, 
Griffin, Woodward Jan. 1 from Hollingbery • KTEN Ada, 
Okla. to Weed Jan. 1 from Raymer • KCMC-TV Texar- 
kana, Tex. to Blair Television Associates Jan. 1 from Ven- 
ard, Rintoul & McConnell • WEAU-TV Eau Claire, Wis. 
to Young Jan. 1 from Hollingbery • WKBT La Crosse, 
Wis. to Avery-Knodel Jan. 1 from H-R Television. 



Ad People: M. Michael Griggs and Jack Goldsmith 

appointed BBDO vps . . . Herman Davis and Maxwell 
Sapan named Compton vps . . . Robert Dolobowsky, ex- 
Grey, named Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield vp . . . 
Carleton Spier retires as vp, dir. & copy supervisor, BBDO. 

Ralph Zeuthen named Compton vp . . . A. O. Bucking- 
ham becomes Y&R senior vp & member of the plans board, 
N.Y. office. He is succeeded as Y&R Ltd. London managing 
dir. by James P. Wilkerson . . . Paul Bradley, Kenyon & 
Eckhardt vp, resigns to form his own PR & sales develop- 
ment firm, Bradley & Associates. 



8 



JANUARY 30, 1961 



Congress 

SEC. 315 INQUIRY SET: Broadcasting’s big brass is 

lined up for the opening FCC-TV-radio event of the 
new Congressional session — the 2 days of Senate hear- 
ings this week on how networks & stations behaved 
themselves politically during the 1960 Presidential 
election campaign (Vol. 17:4 pll). 

FCC Chmn. Ford has been summoned by Commerce 
Communications Subcommittee Chmn. Pastore (D-R.I.) as 
the lead-off witness at 10 a.m. Jan. 31 (Room 5110, New 
Senate Office Bldg.). He will report on the industry’s 
operations under suspension of the Communications Act’s 
Sec. 315 for the top candidates. 

Scheduled to follow Ford to the stand — with the 
industry’s own reports on the experimental lifting of equal- 
time requirements— are CBS Inc. Pres. Frank Stanton, 
NAB Pres. LeRoy Collins and NBC Pres. Robert E. Kint- 
ner. ABC Washington vp Alfred Beckman & MBS Pres. 
Robert F. Hurleigh will testify Feb. 1. 

Unlike industry witnesses in other Congressional inves- 
tigations in recent sessions, they aren’t expected to be 
given a hostile reception by the 5-man Communications 
Subcommittee. Pastore has had nothing but praise for the 
non-equal-time Kennedy-Nixon Great Debate series & other 
network campaign shows. 

The likely outcome of the Senate proceedings is devel- 
opment of Capitol Hill support for permanent suspension 
of Sec. 315 for major-party nominees for President & Vice 
President. Commerce Committee Chmn. Magnuson (D- 
Wash.) has already submitted legislation (S-204) to regu- 
larize the equal-time exemption (Vol. 17:2 pp3&4). 

It’s unlikely, however, that the testimony will bring 
Congress much nearer to NAB’s longtime^legislative goal 
— outright repeal of Sec. 315 to free broadcasters of all 
political broadcast inhibitions. 

Yarborough’s Plans for Watchdog Hearings 

Still to be heard from on the broader Sec. 315 issues 
is Sen. Yarborough (D-Tex.) and his Commerce Freedom 
of Communications Subcommittee. He had announced plans 
for “watchdog” hearings before the end of January to 
explore complaints that broadcasters had discriminated 
against candidates for lesser offices (Vol. 17:2 p4). 

At last week’s end Yarborough had been unable to 
arrange a “watchdog” hearing schedule, however. His 
Subcommittee’s operating appropriation runs out Jan. 31, 
but he planned to ask for an extension to keep his tiny staff 
together, and was determined to go ahead with his plan for 
a public airing of Sec. 315 beefs. 

Meanwhile, the Yarborough Subcommittee’s chief 
counsel Creekmore Fath was busy reading proof on docu- 
mented Sec. 315 background evidence — a half-dozen vol- 
umes containing scripts of political broadcasts in 1960. 
The first volume was due Jan. 30 from the Govt. Printing 
Office. Fath told us no meeting of the Subcommittee to 
plan hearings had been scheduled for this week, but that 
Yarborough will try again to get together with other 
members— Sens. McGee (D-Wyo.) & Scott (R-Pa.): 

On the House side, the usually-turbulent FCC-TV-radio 
investigative front was quiet for a change. Rep. Harris 
(D-Ark.) & his House Commerce Committee, not yet fully 
reorganized for the new session, marked time. 

Sec. 315 was. on the legislative agenda of the Harris 
Committee, too— along with network regulation, trafficking 
in station licenses, ex-parte hanky-panky in regulatory 
agencies, etc. (Vol. 17:2 p2). But the Commerce Committee 



probably won’t get going in these areas this session until 
it sets up a unit to replace its headline-winning legislative 
Oversight Subcommittee. 

Harris also was awaiting ammunition for an investi- 
gative foray into still another broadcasting sector — TV & 
radio audience rating services and how they are used for 
program, network and station promotion. A special study 
of the systems by the American Statistical Assn., commis- 
sioned last year by the Oversight Subcommittee, had been 
scheduled for delivery this week (Vol. 16:52 p3). The 
lengthy ASA report wasn’t finished last week, however. 
And a 3-man ASA team headed by Dr. William Madow was 
told by the Oversighters’ counsel Robert W. Lishman to 
take its time. A companion study of rating services by 
FTC field agents looking for unfair trade practices (Vol. 
16:36 p8) also has been under way since last year. 



Ban on racing information is proposed in an anti-crime 
bill (S-528) co-sponsored by Sens. Wiley (R-Wis.) & Ben- 
nett (R-Utah). In addition to prohibiting use of leased- 
wire services for gambling purposes, the perennially intro- 
duced measure says: “No radio or TV broadcasting station, 
for which a license is required by any law of the United 
States, shall broadcast or permit to be broadcast any 
gambling information relating to horse racing before the 
start of any race on the day it is scheduled to be run, or 
during the one-hour period immediately following the finish 
of such race or before the start of the next race at that 
track, whichever period is longer. This section shall not 
preclude the broadcasting of, or information concerning, a 
horse race where such broadcast is carried as a special 
event, provided that no more than 2 horse races shall be 
broadcast by any station or chain of stations per day.” 
Similar legislation (HR-3022) is sponsored in the House by 
Rep. Cramer (R-Fla.). 

Strict good-conduct rules for govt, employes — and 
members of Congress, too — are proposed in package legisla- 
tion (S-603 & 637 and HR-3450 & H Con. Res. 121) intro- 
duced by Sens. Javits & Keating and Rep. Lindsay (R- 
N.Y.). Among other things, the measures would: (1) Set 
up a joint Congressional committee to draft a permanent 
code of ethics for legislators & legislative employes. (2) 
Codify & update conflict-of-interest laws. (3) Require that 
“any written or oral communication” between members of 
Congress or their staffs and regulatory agencies be placed 
in public records. In a similar legislative move, Sen. 
Proxmire (D-Wis.) submitted a resolution (S. J. Res. 39) 
to establish a 9-man Commission on Ethics. Proxmire’s 
plan was supported in the House by Rep. Bennett (D-Fla.). 
Separate conflict-of-interest bills (HR-3411 & 3412) were 
introduced by Reps. Celler (D-N.Y.) & McCulloch (R-O.). 

Reorganization authority of the White House which 
expired in 1959 would be restored under a bill (S-153) 
approved by the Senate Govt. Operations Committee. Co- 
sponsored by Sens. Humphrey (D-Minn.) & Ervin (D-N.G.), 
the measure would permit the President to revamp struc- 
tures of federal agencies unless the Senate or House vetoed 
his plans (Vo. 17:2 p3). 

Far-reaching probe of “national & international tele- 
communications and the use of communications satellites” 
is on the agenda of the Senate Commerce Committee. 
Chmn. Magnuson (D-Wash.) introduced a housekeeping 
resolution (S. Res. 74) asking for $315,000 to carry on 2- 
year inquiries in the communications areas & in such other 
committee jurisdictions as fisheries,- wildlife and weather. 






VOL. 17: No. 5 



9 



Touchy Untouchables: Rep. Santangelo (D-N.Y.) con- 

tinued his campaign against ABC-TV’s The Untouchables 
last week, on his charge that the series over-emphasizes 
gangsters of Italian origin, obtaining an agreement that 
ABC officials would meet with him & other Congressmen in 
Washington Feb. 1. 

Santangelo said that representatives of Sons of Italy 
had met with ABC officials in N.Y. last week, but that 
“they were sloughed off with some sort of promise to clean 
up the program for next season. That’s not satisfactory 
to me,” he said. 

He’s not completely grim on the subject, however, 
relating that someone had suggested a counter-measure to 
the program : “Have it followed with a program featuring 
Gina Lollobrigida, Sophia Loren and other Italian beauties 
— and call it\The Touchables.” 

Ex-Attorney General Rogers added his weight to the 
blast by James V. Bennett, dir. of the Bureau of Prisons 
(Vol. 17:3 pl4). He wrote' to Sen. Schoeppel (R-Kan.), 
who had been aroused by Bennett’s complaint about the A1 
Capone episodes. “I am advised,” Rogers wrote, “that 
none of the events, or anything like them, actually occur- 
red. The transfer of Capone & the other prisoners was 
routine and made without a single untoward incident or 
effort to escape. Mr. Bennett, who was an asst. dir. of the 
Prison Bureau at that time, says the whole program ‘was 
as phony as the payola quiz shows’ . . . The program here 
involved seems to me, like payola & the quiz shows, another 
example of broadcasters failing to fulfill their duties as 
trustees for the public. For it should have been obvious to 
them & the producers that the use of the semi-documentary 
form would mislead many watchers into believing that the 
venality & brutality of the officers of the prison service in 
fact existed.” 



Joint Committee on the Budget, to study & screen 
budget proposals of federal agencies & departments, would 
be set up under a bi-partisan bill (S-529) introduced by 
Sen. McClellan (D-Ark.). The new 14-member group would 
be empowered to pass on all money requests before they 
reach Senate & House Appropriations Committees. 

“National AGVA Week” would be celebrated Oct. 9-15 
under a House proposal (H. J. Res. 157) by Rep. Halpern 
(R-N.Y.). Rejf. Celler (D-N.Y.) suggested June 4-10 for 
the observance in an earlier resolution (Vol. 17:4 pll). 

Another daytimer bill (HR-3334), to extend operating 
hours of sunrise-to-sunset radio stations to 6 a.m.-6 p.m., 
has been introduced in the House by Rep. Pelly (R-Wash.). 
Similar Communications Act changes (HR-3469) were pro- 
posed by Rep. Shipley (D-Ill.) . 

Foreign 

Formosa will get color TV, if Chiang Kai-shek ac- 
cepts an offer of technical & economic assistance from 
Matsutaro Shoriki, chairman of Japan’s Nippon TV Net- 
work. “If President Chiang so desires,” Shoriki said, 
“NTV is prepared to send technicians and to furnish funds 
to start color TV.” He said an outlay of 100-to-200 million 
yen ($280,000-560,000) would be ample to introduce color 
TV in Taipei & nearby communities. 

Roving radio station, equal in power to “4 top U.S. 
stations” and ready to be flown “almost anywhere on the 
globe,” is planned by Voice of America dir. Henry Loomis. 
The portable truck-mounted transmitter would be available 
for emergency service to supplement VOA installations. 



Auxiliary Services 

Wore about 

TELEMETER’S U.S. PLANS: Midwest Video Corp., the 
multiple-CATV owner picked as the first announced 
U.S. Telemeter operator (see p. 3), hopes to run Tele- 
meter installations in other cities in addition to Little 
Rock, we were told by a Midwest spokesman. One dis- 
tinct possibility is Austin, Tex. 

Midwest Video’s backers are substantial. Its president, 
C. Hamilton Moses, an attorney, is former chmn. of Ark. 
Power & Light Co. and Louisiana Power & Light Co., is 
currently a dir. & exec, committee member of the Ark. 
power firm, and is past president of Ark. State C. of C. 
Others associated with Midwest: Winthrop Rockefeller; 
Sterling Stores Pres. David Grundfest; Walter E. Huss- 
man, pres, of South West Newspapers and of KCMC-TV & 
KCMC Texarkana, Tex. 

Midwest currently has contract to wire up one-station 
Austin, Tex. for CATV, and contemplates eventually add- 
ing a Telemeter installation there. Midwest officials 
declined to estimate timetables or costs for either the Little 
Rock or the Austin system — but at least in Little Rock, 
timing depends on the length & outcome of PSC proceeding. 

Commenting on its Midwest Video tie-up, TeLmeter 
Pres. Louis A. Novins announced: “We are now prepared 
to move ahead in selected situations in the U.S. which are 
representative of large sections of the population. The 
development of Telemeter in our country will be on a 
‘grass roots’ basis. In each area, Telemeter rights will be 
licensed to a local group that includes important local 
interests with high standing in that community.” 



Last-minute reprieve from the White House was hoped 
for at last week’s end by Walter Reed Hospital’s medical 
TV center dir. Dr. Paul W. Schafer, to save his million- 
dollar installation from budget-economy dissolution (Vol. 
17:2 p9). “Whether we live or die at 5 p.m. Jan. 30, when 
we’ve been ordered to close down, is up to the President’s 
office now,” Dr. Schafer told us. Spumed by Surgeon Gen- 
eral Leonard D. Heaton, who initiated the shutdown 
order, Dr. Schafer enlisted active Congressional support — 
including Sen. Humphrey (D-Minn.) & Rep. Flood (D-Pa.) 
— to carry his case to the White House. They asked Presi- 
dent Kennedy’s legal aide Myer (Mike) Feldman, a broad- 
casting veteran, to try to see to it that the budget slash is 
held up at least long enough for another look at the TV 
center’s operations. 

Re-match between heavyweight champion Floyd Pat- 
terson & contender Ingemar Johansson March 13 will be a 
fund-raiser for N.Y. Heart Association. TelePrompTer, 
which is handling TV closed-circuiting (Vol. 17:1 pll) will 
feed the Miami fight to a Madison Square Garden audience 
of 12,000 and the Heart Assn, will collect proceeds on all 
sales (except the lowest-priced $5.50 seats). “Golden Circle” 
seats will sell at $100. TelePrompTer also announced that 
BBC has bought TV & radio rights for $50,000. Adding this 
to the $300,000 from ABC for radio rights, the bout will 
yield “more money than any previous fight in history,” 
said TelePrompTer Pres. Irving B. Kahn. 

Add anti-pay-TV bills: House Judiciary Committee 
Chmn. Celler (D-N.Y.), long a foe of pay-as-you-see TV, 
has reintroduced a measure (HR-3020) prohibiting charging 
of fees for home viewing. " : • ; • ■ 



10 



JANUARY 30, 1961 



Film & Tape 

WGA-Nelson Conflict Settled: One of the Writers Guild of 
America’s shortest strike calls ended late Friday when 
producer-director-star Ozzie Nelson verbally agreed to sign 
a contract, 3 days after the Guild had called its strike 
against him. At the same time, Stage 5 Productions, which 
films Nelson’s ABC-TV series, The Adventures of Ozzie & 
Harriet, signed with WGA. 

Originally Nelson had refused to sign with WGA, bas- 
ing his stand on a legal point, on an outspoken resistance 
to the royalty concept for writers written into the new 
contract, and on opposition to the pension plan. 

WGA said that last fall, 3 writers who work for 
Nelson on his ABC-TV series, The Adventures of Ozzie & 
Harriet, joined the Guild: Dick Bensfield, Perry Grant, 
and Don Nelson, the producer’s brother. Consequently, 
WGA tried to sign Ozzie Nelson, who has never been a 
signatory in his 9 years in TV film. He refused. 

Prior to the settlement, Nelson explained that inas- 
much as he had signed the 3 writers prior to their joining 
the Guild, WGA, by calling them out on strike, would be 
“forcing them to commit an illegal act” (breach of con- 
tract). “I am not against unions,” he added. “I was a 
member of the old Screen Writers Guild. But there have to 
be a couple of voices in the wilderness to alert the people 
that our free enterprise system is going down the drain.” 

He told us he could see why actors should have pen- 
sions and should share in residuals (“they have short-lived 
careers, as a rule; writers don’t”), but he saw no reason for 
extending these benefits to writers. He said he had paid his 
writers over scale for years, even though not a WGA 
signatory. Pensions for writers are “ridiculous,” he re- 
marked, mentioning that his writers are “3 years younger 
than I am.” “The writer today gets unemployment insur- 
ance, social security, royalty and a pension. The Guild is 
telling the companies in effect: ‘These writers are idiots 
who can’t take care of themselves, so you, the employer, 
must put money away for them.’ ” As for the royalty con- 
cept of residuals, Nelson said “I don’t want partners. 

He added that the Guild hadn’t called him in the 19 
years he had been on TV & radio, and he couldn’t under- 
stand the belated interest. Kenyon replied that there was 
nothing WGA could have done about Nelson’s operation 
previously, because his writers had been non-Guild scripters 
until last fall. 



Public-affairs series, Face of the World (30-min., 13- 
episodes, on international social, religious & economic cus- 
toms), produced by Westinghouse Bcstg. Co. & the Jesuit 
Missions National Information Center, debuted Jan. 15 on 
the 5 WBC stations. WBC has also sold it to WNEW-TV 
N.Y. and may offer it for general distribution. Reports on 
customs of Korea, Japan, Iraq & India are highlights. 

Myrna Fahey has been signed by MGM-TV as the 
“bride” for its Father of the Bride pilot. Leon Ames is 
“father.” Robert Maxwell is. producer . . . Bob Hope will 
me the Oscar Awards April 17, to be telecast on ABG-TV 
. . . Albert J. Cohen has been replaced as producer of The 
Racer by Phil Shuken as exec, producer and John Greene & 
Herb Stewart as co-producers ... Joe Naar, ex-Revue 
Studios producer, has joined Screen Gems . . . Herbert 
Marshall stars in The Atoner, Four Star Television 
pilot to be seen on Dick Powell’s Zane Grey Theater . . . 
Mark Richman stars in the pilot of MGM-TV’s Cain s 
Hundred, being made for NBC-TW 



Film’s Export Problems & Promises: Complex & often 

frustrating problems face American TV film companies 
seeking to sell their wares abroad. And the problems are 
growing. This was the consensus expressed last week at 
an Academy of Television Arts & Sciences meeting in 
Hollywood by panelists Richard Dinsmore, West Coast 
sales mgr. for Screen Gems; Robert Lewine, CBS Films 
program vp, and Henry White, gen. mgr., WNTA-TV N.Y. 

“We haven’t scratched the surface in the overseas 
market yet,” said Dinsmore, who thought England posed 
the greatest current problem because of its stringent quota 
restrictions. And Japan is another problem because it 
won’t pay more than $500 for any U.S. film. 

Still another headache looms south of the border, the 
SG executive went on, disclosing that each South American 
country now wants U.S. telefilms dubbed in the country 
where they are shown. The cost of such an operation would 
be exorbitant, he pointed out. Dinsmore said, too, that 
Latin America is shying away from U.S. telefilms which 
contain too much violence, and a number of these nations 
plan to produce their own shows. Nevertheless Latin 
America was optimistically described as the largest poten- 
tial customer for American films. Most of the problems 
are associated with a surge of nationalism, and Dinsmore 
expressed confidence that they will be resolved. He said he 
looked for the new Washington administration (“and this 
would be true no matter who had won”) to pour a lot of 
money into South America, which will inevitably help the 
U.S. telefilm companies selling product there. 

Lewine attributed quota systems such as England’s to 
the fact that “people overseas prefer American films to 
their home-grown product.” There is resentment abroad 
that more foreign-made films aren’t seen in the U.S., but 
such films would never be acceptable to the mass market 
here, he declared. 

White said in this connection that foreign producers 
are becoming increasingly alert to American tastes and are 
turning out shows with the U.S. market as their principal 
target. There is an increasing aggressiveness in the selling 
of foreign TV films to the U.S. market, he added. 

Dinsmore predicted that eventually Germany would be 
the best market for American TV films, Brazil second. 

Films produced in England, Japan, and France, as well 
as commercials from England & Japan, were shown. 



Cautious optimism for an IATSE settlement with the 
TV & movie producers was expressed last week by some 
sources engaged in the talks. Negotiators appeared eager 
to reach agreement on a new contract as soon as possible. 
The present one expires this Tuesday (Jan. 31). One 
leading TV-film executive told us: “We feel labor & 
management are completely aware of the mutuality of the 
problems, and are trying to find a way to their solution.” 
Both sides were reported working on compromise proposals. 
Key IATSE demands are a 25% across-the-board wage 
hike; increase in pension and health & welfare benefits, 
and compensation from movie producers for post-1948 
movies sold to TV. Among those taking part in some of 
the intensive negotiations as observers were Revue Studio 
Pres. Taft Schreiber, Four Star Television Pres. Dick 
Powell, MGM Pres. Joseph R. Vogel, and Paramount Pic- 
tures Pres. Barney Balaban. 

Flying A Productions, Gene Autry’s TV film company 
which has been inactive for several years, may return to 
production this year, we’re told by Autry, who adds that 
he is considering starring in a series. 



VOL. 17: No. 5 



11 



NEW YORK ROUNDUP 



Add syndication sales: Trans-Lux has sold the West- 
inghouse-produced series, The American Civil War, to the 
5-circuit Armed Forces TV Network . . . Ziv-UA’s Miami 
Undercover is now in 102 markets; new sales include WGN- 
TV Chicago, KONO-TV San Antonio, WRBL-TV Columbus, 
Ga. . . . Javelin Productions (new ITC div.) has sold The 
National Football League Presents (60-min. films of the 
1960 NFL games) in 38 markets. Sales include WPIX N.Y., 
WBBM-TV Chicago, WMAR-TV Baltimore . . . UAA’s post- 
1948 UA package has been bought in 3 new markets, includ- 
ing WNBQ Chicago, bringing the total to almost 60 . . . 
MCA-TV sold its off-network 30-min. mystery-adventure 
series, M-Squad, in 14 new markets, upping the total to 30. 
New sales include KYW-TV Cleveland, KPIX San Fran- 
cisco, WHEN-TV Syracuse. 

N.Y. chapter of Academy of TV Arts & Sciences has 
formed a new local stations committee, to be headed by 
Frank J. Shakespeare, Jr., WCBS-TV vp-gen. mgr., and 
Bennet H. Korn, Metropolitan Bcstg. exec, vp for TV. “We 
feel it is now incumbent upon us to serve the interests of 
the 7 local N.Y. TV stations and to stimulate the coopera- 
tive effort on behalf of the N.Y. community,” said ATAS 
N.Y. Pres. Hem’y S. White. 

NTA has sold 17 of its feature films, many of which 
have been telecast, to theatrical distributor Exclusive Inter- 
national Films. Included in the deal are “High Noon,” 
“Cyrano de Bergerac” and “The Bells of St. Mary’s.” EIF 
Pres. Edward Gray said a recent sampling proved “exhib- 
itors are still interested despite their TV-exposure.” 

WPIX N.Y. has scored one foreign & 2 domestic sales 
for its newest 60-min. station-produced documentary, 
“Castro, Cuba and Communism,” less than 24 hours after 
its pre-telecast release in syndication. KBTV Denver, 
KHVH-TV Honolulu and a TV station in Holland bought 
the film, which gets its initial airing on WPIX Feb. 16. 

People: Henry Traiman has been named Gerald Pro- 
ductions vp & exec, producer . . . Harold Winston appointed 
Screen Gems de Mexico, S.A. gen. mgr. . . . Anthony Azzato 
has resigned as NTA syndication sales supervisor, effective 
Jan. 31 . . . Joseph Kotler named Ziv-UA N.Y. sales vp . . . 
Jerry Bredouw, ex-Y&R, has joined 20th Century-Fox TV 
as asst, to production chief Roy Huggins . . . Dennis 
( Gunsmoke ) Weaver’s 3 sons, Robert, Rick and Rustin, 
make their acting debut in a Gunsmoke segment being 
directed by their father . . . Shirley Jones, Connie Stevens 
and Vic Damone star in “The Jimmy McHugh Story,” 60- 
min. taped special being made by Heritage Productions . . . 
James F. Delaney has been named ABC Films Southern 
div. mgr. . . . Ziv-UA associate producer-dir. Larry Dobkin 
has resigned. 



ORDER YOUR 1960 BOUND VOLUME 

We will bind & index all 1960 copies of Tele- 
vision Digest, Vol. 16, including supplements and 
special reports. This embossed hard-cover volume — 
the authoritative record of the television industry in 
1960 — is available at $25.00. Orders will be accepted 
through February 1, 1961. 



HOLLYWOOD ROUNDUP 



Screen Actors Guild is voting by mail on a new con- 
tract negotiated for non-theatrical industrial & educational 
movies. All minimum wage increases would be retroactive 
to last July 21. Principal benefits: (1) Producer to pay an 
additional 5% of gross compensation for the pension and 
health & welfare plans, with limitation of $25,000 per actor 
per picture. (2) Day-player minimum raised from $80 to 
$85 as of last July 21, and to $90 July 21, 1961. (3) Weekly 
free-lance rate raised from $300 to $318.75 and then to 
$337.50. (4) Three-day contracts eliminated. (5) Addi- 
tional compensation for restricted TV & theatrical rights, 
with player to be compensated on basis of his actual salary, 
up to $150 a day and $562.50 a week, rather than on mini- 
mum rates, as provided in the old contract. The contract 
would expire July 20, 1962. 

U.S. Court of Appeals in San Francisco upheld writer 
Ray Bradbury’s claim that his novel, Fahrenheit 450, had 
been pirated for a Playhouse 90 show on CBS-TV entitled 
Sound of Distant Dnimmers. The Appellate Court reversed 
a lower court decision which had held there was no simil- 
arity between the Bradbury story and the Robert Alan 
Aurthur teleplay. It ordered Federal Judge Leon Yank- 
wich to assess damages against CBS-TV & Aurthur. Brad- 
bury had asked $50,000. The Appellate Court did not alter 
a previous decision absolving ex-Playhouse 90 producer 
Martin Manulis from any involvement in plagiarism. 

General Foods is negotiating for Lucille Ball to star in 
a filmed 60-min. special next season. Desi Arnaz would 
produce it . . . Producing Artists Corp. is projecting a series 
called Mr. Broadway Presents, using old musical hits. 
. . . Desilu Productions will pilot The Holidays Abroad, 
starring Dan Duryea. Joseph Shaftel will produce. 

Screen Gems plans a new 60-min. series, Reckless, 
written by W. R. Burnett . . . Roncom Productions will pilot 
Column 8, a 30-min. newspaper drama created by Frank 
Fenton & John Resner. Exec, producer Alvin Cooperman 
will film the pilot in mid-February at Desilu studios. 

Ziv-UA chalked up some kind of speed record last week 
when director Monroe Askins brought in a segment of 
Lock Up in a little more than one day’s shooting. Ordinary 
time for a 30-min. film is 2 to 3 days, sometimes more. 

Four Star Television will pilot W yoming Mustang, 
starring Don Burnett & Jim Beck. The film will be seen as 
part of the Stagecoach West series, produced by Vincent 
Fennelly. 

People: Wayde Preston, Don Francks, Basil Rathbone 
and Hoagy Carmichael are signed to star in War Birds, the 
Filmways pilot being produced for Cal. National ... In 
other CNP pilots, Robert Knapp will star in 7 Cannery 
Row; Joseph Campanella, Ron Foster and L. Q. Jones in 
3 White Hats; Richard Garland in Cottage 54 . . . Desilu 
producer David Heilweil (Guestward Ho!) has left TV to 
produce movies for 20th Century-Fox . . . Janet Gaynor & 
George Murphy star in Sweet 16, a comedy. Home-James 
Productions will film the pilot at Desilu Gower for NBC-TV. 
Ed James is producer . . . Jack Minor, ex-sales-ad dir. for 3 
Chrysler lines, has joined Don Fedderson Productions as 
sales & development vp . . . Bud Yorkin & Harry Sosnik 
will produce the Academy of TV Arts & Sciences Emmy 
show on NBC-TV May 16 . . . James Best & Adam West 
star in Rio, 60-min. Roncom Productions pilot: 





12 



JANUARY 30, 1961 



Networks 

NBC-TV’s financial details have never been divulged by 
parent-company RCA, reminded NBC vp Sydney H. Eiges 
last week when we asked him about Variety’s Jan. 25 story 
on the subsidiary’s earnings. There is no reason for placing 
any credence in these figures, the result of sheer guesswork, 
we were informed. “All we can say,” said Eiges, “is that 
this has been the greatest profit year in our history — which 
is what we said in our annual report” (Vol. 17:3 p7). 
NBC-TV cleared a mere $2 million profit from a $220 mil- 
lion outlay, said the trade paper, but NBC as a whole, and 
before deduction of colorcasting costs, not only made over 
$17.5 million in 1960, but has told the RCA board it will 
overtake $24-million profit-maker CBS Inc. in 3-4 years. 
Variety based its estimates on the fact that despite the 
network’s “bits & pieces” nighttime business, daytime 
schedule earnings soared, news & public affairs cut losses 
and picked up big sponsors like Purex and Gulf, o&o’s are 
making big profits, NBC International earned a “substan- 
tial profit” from foreign station ownership & program 
sales, and Cal. National Productions — the NBC telefilm 
arm — is “doing nicely.” 

CBS-TV lit a slow fuse in the affiliates camp with its 
new 10 a.m.-12 noon rotating participation plan (Vol. 17:3 
p6). While affiliates committee Pres. Richard A. Borel 
(WBNS-TV Columbus) would say only that “we’re involved 
in a study as prelude to a letter we’ll send to the network, 
probably next week,” another (but understandably anony- 
mous) committee man maintained that the letter will 
deal directly with the situation. Stations, which see the 
network cutting into their spot market, reportedly will 
draw the line this time, using affiliation and clearances as 
clubs. 

CBS & NBC have both announced reciprocal arrange- 
ments with RAI, Italy’s only TV-radio network. Although 
similar services will be rendered by both U.S. networks, 
their plans differ in intent. CBS-TV stations div. will 
assist RAI with exchange of information on technical devel- 
opments, production, public-affairs & promotional tech- 
niques, personnel & equipment. NBC’s plan calls for assist- 
ance in the development of RAI’s “2nd network” and color 
TV. It’ll give advice on studio design, layout and facilities. 

Public-issues series Briefing Session, produced last 
year by NBC-TV in cooperation with the National Educa- 
tional TV & Radio Center, will be continued by NET for its 
48 affiliates, with the AFL-CIO splitting production costs. 
The first 30-min. film in the new series, produced by N.Y.’s 
Joel O’Brien Productions, probably, will be available to 
ETV & non-competing commercial stations in February. 

“Meet the Press” 1969 co-op sates revenue was up 
300% over 1959, announces NBC-TV. Number of stations 
selling the program more than doubled during the year to 
a total of 53. Banks & insurance companies were the most 
frequent buyers. The station lineup reached 118, also a 
record total. 

Network affiliation changes: KMSP-TV Minneapolis 
gets ABC-TV affiliation April 16; taking over from WTCN- 
' TV there • WISN-TV Milwaukee, formerly with ABC-TV, 
. joins CBS-TV. Former CBS-TV affiliate WITI-TV joins 
ABC-TV next April. 

CBC. directors will meet in Quebec Feb. 13-15 — their 
first conclave in that city since BBG was set up in 1958. 
The board assembles in various Canadian cities in order 
to acquaint itself with CBC outlets & their problems. ' 



NETWORK SALES ACTIVITY 



Sports sponsor Gillette put $2,700,000 into entertainment 
TV last week. The investment, intended to “supplement” 
its present ABC-TV sports shows ( Fight of the Week, Sat. 
10-10:45 p.m.; Make that Spare, Sat. 10:45-11 p.m.), will 
be divided evenly between ABC and NBC over the next 6 
months. Company officials termed a Jan. 25 trade paper 
report that Gillette is “retrenching from ABC” “obviously 
inaccurate.” Said Gillette vp & ad dir. A. Craig Smith: 
“We want to give our products exposure during the first 
half of the year, comparable to what they receive on ABC 
[sports shows] during the 2nd half.” (See below.) 

ABC-TV 

Action cartoon series, Mon.-Fri., 5:30-6 p.m., part. eff. Mar. 

B. F. Goodrich (Foote, Cone & Belding) 

Asphalt Jungle, Sun. 9:30-10:30 p.m., part. eff. April. 
Speidel (McCann-Marschalk) 

Hawaiian Eye, Wed. 9-10 p.m., part. eff. March. 

Corn Products (Lennen & Newell) 

The Islanders, Sun. 9:30-10:30 p.m.; Stagecoach West, Tue. 

9-10 p.m.; The Roaring Twenties, Sat. 7:30- 
8:30 p.m.; The Asphalt Jungle, Sun. 9:30- 
10:30 p.m.; part. eff. Feb. 5, April, June 17, 
& April respectively. 

Gilette (Maxon) 

CBS-TV 

Masters Golf Tournament, Sat. April 8, 5-6 p.m. & Sun. 
April 9, 4-5:30 p.m. co-sponsorship. 
American Express (Benton & Bowles) 
Travelers Insurance (Young & Rubicam) 

The Red Skelton Timex Special, Fri. April 21, 8:30-9 p.m. 
full sponsorship. 

U.S. Time Corp. (W. B. Doner) 

The Gunslingers, Thu. 9-10 p.m.; part. eff. Feb. 9. 

Gilette (Maxon) 

NBC-TV 

The Americans, Mon. 7:30-8:30 p.m., part. eff. Feb. & May 
respectively. 

Max Factor (Kenyon & Eckhardt) 

Fedders (Hicks & Greist) 

Michael Shayne, Fri. 10-11 p.m., part. eff. Jan. & Feb. resp. 
Philip Morris (Leo Burnett) 

Max Factor (Kenyon & Eckhardt) 



Educational Broadcasting 

Canada’s first ETV station is in the works. A Toronto 
outlet, for which a Ch. 19 application will be filed in Feb- 
ruary by the Metropolitan Educational Television Assn, of 
Toronto, will “likely” get the approval of the Board of 
Broadcast Governors, says Chmn. Dr. Andrew Stewart. 
BBG regulations covering educational TV will have to be 
drafted as there are none at present. META expects to 
have the outlet in experimental operation by 1962. 

Educational FM stations may use subcarrief transmis- 
sions, effective Feb. 2, for multiplex broadcasts of specialized 
programs, following last week’? finalization of rule-making 
by FCC. Said the Commission: “These multiplexed trans- 
missions can be made only simultaneously when the main 
channel is being programmed. They can present material 
for which the only consideration is the matter furnished 
and/or the payment of any line charges involved. No com- 
mercial announcements or references are permitted,” 




VOL. 17: No. b 



13 



Television Digest 

PUBLISHED BY TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. 

WALTER H. ANNENBERG, President 

PUBLICATION OFFICE Radnor, Pa., MUrray 8-3940, TWX: Radnor 1028 



JAMES T. QUIRK, MERRILL PANITT, Editorial Director 

Business Manager HAROLD B. CLEMENKO, Managing Editor 
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Asst. Business Mgr. PAUL STONE 



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Copyright 1961, by Triangle Publications, Inc. 



Personals: John T. Madigan, acting dir. of ABC News & 

Public Affairs (Vol. 17:2 pl3), named dir. . . . Lester 
Gottlieb, ex-General Artists Corp., named special-programs 
dir., NBC-TV, succeeding Richard Linkroum, who returns 
to studio production . . . Harry Mandel named pres., RKO 
Theatres, succeeding Sol Schwartz, appointed a Columbia 
Pictures vp. Matthew Polon named vp. 

Peter Mead Abel of CBS-TV legal dept, elected asst, 
secy, of CBS and named asst, general attorney of CBS cor- 
porate legal dept. & secy.’s office . . . Clifford M. Kirtland, 
treas. & controller, elected a vp of Transcontinent TV Corp. 
. . . 0. W. Myers promoted from national sales mgr. to gen. 
mgr. of WHTN-TV Huntington-Charleston, W. Va., recently 
purchased by Reeves Bcstg. & Development Corp. 

Roger W. LeGrand appointed mgr., WITI-TV Mil- 
waukee, succeeding Joseph W. Evans Jr., who assumes 
same post at WSPD-TV Toledo, replacing Peter Storer, 
recently named head of Storer’s new national TV spot sales 
company. William J. Flynn, ex-WAGA-TV Atlanta, named 
gen. sales mgr. and E. Dean McCarthy, operations mgr., 
WITI-TV. McCarthy reassumes his position after organiz- 
ing & operating for a year Storer’s quality-control dept., 
and replaces Glenn G. Boundy Jr. Flynn replaces Emmett 
A. Hassett. All are Storer stations. 

David Fuchs promoted from mgr. to dir. of sales pres- 
entations, CBS-TV ... Don Heath named head of new 
MBS West Coast news bureau in San Francisco . . . Jack 
F. Brembeck named director of community services, KABC- 
TV Los Angeles, continuing as promotion-publicity director 
... Martin Weldon named news & specials events dir., 
Metropolitan Bcstg. Corp. 

James Robertson named network affairs vp, NET. Paul 
Owen promoted from associate dir. to dir., station relations 
. . . Robert A. Bicks, Asst. Attorney General in charge of 
Anti-Trust Div., resigned as of Jan. 20, returning to N.Y. 
as partner in firm of Freed, Abbott & Morgan . . . William 
P. Andrews promoted from gen. sales mgr. to syndication 
vp, ITG . . . Thomas I. King appointed promotion & PR dir., 
KOOL-TV & KOOL Phoenix; succeeding Tom Calhoun. 

Gerald Clayton Beadle, BBC-TV dir., has been knighted. 
Peter Dim mock, head of BBC-TV’s outside broadcasts, has 
received the Order of the British Empire . . . Bill McBride, 
WOW-TV Omaha program dir., addressed the Neb. Uni- 
cameral Legislature on “The Challenge We Face,” during 
a seminar on. cold war. strategy 



Roger Lalieau promoted from account exec, to Edward 
Petry vp & client relations dir. ... Jim Smith named mgr. 
of new Adam Young Boston office (129 Newbury St., 
Congress 2-1145). 

Wallace Turner, news dir. of KPTV Portland, Ore., 
ex-Portland Oregonian reporter and Pulitzer Prize & 
Heywood Broun Award winner, appointed public affairs 
asst, to HEW Secy. Abraham A. Ribicoflf . . . Jean-Marie 
Beaudet, secy.-general of Canadian Music Centre, Toronto, 
named CBC asst, programming vp . . . Marvin Blumberg 
advanced to partnership in A. D. Ring & Associates, Wash- 
ington consulting engineers. 

■ 

NAB Pres. LeRoy Collins met the press at a Jan. 24 
reception at the Broadcasters Club in Washington. Guests 
of NAB at the party included Washington TV & radio 
correspondents, local newspaper columnists and trade-pub- 
lication staffers. Representatives of the networks & Wash- 
ington stations also attended. NAB Policy Committee 
Chmn. Clair R. McCollough and top NAB staff members 
accompanied Collins at the reception. 

New OCDM chief is Frank Burton Ellis, 53, senior 
partner in the New Orleans law firm of Ellis, Lancaster & 
King, and 1952-54 Democratic National Committeeman 
from La. Announcing his choice of Ellis as the successor 
to OCDM dir. Leo A. Hoegh, President Kennedy said “a 
partner in the New Orleans law firm of Ellis, Lancaster & 
mobilization programs” would be the agency’s “first order 
of business.” 

Meetings next week: Hollywood Ad Club luncheon 
(Feb. 6). RAB Pres. Kevin Sweeney will speak on “Radio 
1961.” Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel » U. of Tex. journalism 
seminar (6-7). “The Role of the Mass Media in a Demo- 
cratic Society.” U. of Tex., Austin. 

NBC’s David Brinkley has received a public service 
award from La Salle College, Pa. citing his “fair, thorough 
reporting in an exacting medium, and refreshing originality 
[in] the purveying of news.” 

Obituary 

Norman Siegel, 54, ex-CBS-TV publicity dir. in Holly- 
wood, dropped to his death from the roof of a Hollywood 
building Jan. 24. The coroner said it was suicide. Siegel 
was West Coast editor of Photoplay magazine at the time 
of his death. He had formerly been publicity dir. for 
Paramount Pictures, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts 
& Sciences and the Screen Directors Guild. 

Stations 

Unbuilt WCIV (Ch. 4) Charleston, S.C. will have 
changed ownership under terms of an application filed 
with FCC. Present owner Atlantic Coast Bcstg. Corp. will 
hold 33 1/3% in a new corporation, First Charleston Corp. 
The balance will be held by 10 prominent business & pro- 
fessional men of the area. President will be attorney 
Henry F. Sherrill, Atlantic Coast's share will be split: 
George Clinton, 40%; Charles E. Smith, 40%; Dorothy A. 
Marks, 20%. The 10 newcomers will put $66,000 into the 
company which also has a $150,000 bank commitment. 

Radio WSAI Cincinnati has been sold for $1.2 million 
by Consolidated Sun Ray Inc. (radios WPEN Philadelphia 
& WALT Tampa) to Jupiter Bcstg. Inc., which is owned 
50% each by investment firms Fox, Wells & Rogers and 
Payson & Trask. : 




14 



JANUARY 30, 1961 



NEW & UPCOMING STATIONS: Two educational outlets 
started programming Jan. 30 — KAET (Ch. 8) Phoe- 
nix, Ariz. and KOAP-TV (Ch. 10) Portland, Ore. This 
raises the non-commercial on-air total to 54 (15 uhf). 

As reported last week, KTLE (Ch. 6) Pocatello, Ida. 
left the air Jan. 23, stating that it must make other 
arrangements for programming now that NBC-TV affilia- 
tion belongs to KIFI-TV (Ch. 8) Idaho Falls (Vol. 17:4 
p6). FCC has given the station permission to remain off 
the air until April 23. With KTLE dark, the U.S. on-air 
grand total, including educational outlets, is 518 (91 uhf). 
Although WWTV (Ch. 13) Cadillac, Mich, is off the air 
because of fire (opposite column), we’re not subtracting it 
from the on-air total, since it plans to resume soon. 

KTLE is the 11th U.S. commercial vhf outlet to go 
dark because of economic difficulties. The 11 failures include 
Ch. 6 in Nampa, Ida., Ch. 13 Honolulu, and Ch. 12 in Lincoln, 
Neb. But the total does not include the mergers of share- 
time stations in Phoenix, Kansas City, Minneapolis & 
Monterey-Salinas. Also left out was the move of Ch. 9 
from Hattiesburg, Miss, to Baton Rouge, La. because Ch. 7 
had replaced it in Hattiesburg. 

KAET Phoenix has a Du Mont transmitter which was 
acquired from KVAR (Ch. 12) Phoenix and a 61-ft. tower 
with a 36-ft. antenna on South Mountain. Owner is Ari- 
zona State University. R. H. Bell, dir. of the U.’s Bureau of 
Broadcasting, is gen. mgr.; Sheldon P. Siegel, also from the 
Bureau, production mgr.; Philip M. Rock, producer-dir. ; 
Lynn E. Dryer, from the Bureau, chief engineer. 

KOAP-TV Portland has a 5-kw RCA transmitter and a 
200-ft. Fisher tower on Healy Heights, West Portland. 
Owner is State Board of Higher Education, which also 
operates KOAC-TV (Ch. 7) Corvallis, Ore. Owner’s hq 
are in Eugene, where it operates U. of Ore., which has a 
medical & dental school in Portland, as well as a General 
Extension Div. It also operates Portland State College in 
that city. Chief engineer Anton H. Schmidt, ex-KOAC-TV, 
is the only employee reported thus far for the station. 

* * * 

In our continuing survey of upcoming stations, here are 
the latest reports received from principals : 

CFTM-TV (Ch. 10) Montreal, Que. has changed target 
to Feb. 13-18 with movies & news, and official opening Feb. 
19, writes Maurice Doucet, technical dir. It has installed an 
18-kw Marconi transmitter and will use a temporary 125-ft. 
tower, pending its move next summer to a special tower 
which will provide space for all Montreal TV & FM stations. 
At that time its 3-bay Alford antenna will be mounted 354- 
ft. above ground. Base hour will be $1,000. Reps will be 
Forjoe, Paul L’Anglais Inc. and Stovin-Byles. 

CHBC-TV (Ch. 5) Keremeos, B.C. expects to start in 
mid-February as a satellite of CHBC-TV (Ch. 2) Kelowna, 
B.C. Licensee is Keremeos-Cawston Television Society, 
headed by H. Blakeborough, but all contraction work has 
been done by CHBC-TV, with funds furnished by the 
society. It will be the 5th in the chain of low-power, unat- 
tended, automatic repeaters of CHBC-TV. 



Communications excise tax is applicable to payments 
by TV & radio stations to news services for the telegraphed 
& telephoned information which is not collected by the 
stations as part of their general news service to the public, 
the Internal Revenue Service has ruled (Rev. Rul. 61-14). 
Exemptions from the tax are permitted only when news- 
service subscribers certify that they utilize the service for 
disseminating news, IRS said. 



TV & radio need religion to help them stay on “the 
responsible path of service,” Sen. Hartke (D-Ind.), a Com- 
merce Committee member, said last week. Addressing the 
annual convention of National Religious Bcstrs. Inc. in 
Washington, he urged the organization to lend its “re- 
spected voice to the concern over the problems of broadcast 
operators, the regulating agencies and the allocation of 
broadcast frequencies.” As for the TV & radio industry 
itself, Hartke said its leaders had displayed “prompt & 
effective reaction” to responsibilities placed on them by 
Congressional suspension of the Communications Act’s 
equal-time requirements for Presidential tickets. Another 
convention speaker was Sen. Mundt (R-N.D.), who said 
religious broadcasts on “the perils of Communist subversion 
& perversion” should be beamed to audiences at home & 
abroad. Mundt also said TV & radio “have a tremendous 
impact & a great value at hearings of Congress.” NAB 
greetings to the religious broadcasters were brought by 
Pres. LeRoy Collins, who addressed the convention briefly, 
as did FCC Chmn. Ford. 

WWTV (Ch. 13) Cadillac, Mich, transmitter house & 
contents were totally destroyed by a fire early Jan. 24. 
Pres. John E. Fetzer estimated the loss at about $500,000, 
and expressed hope that operations could resume within 
about 2 weeks, using temporary facilities. The 1,282-ft. 
tower & antenna, 7 ft. from the building, were not dam- 
aged. Cause of the fire is thought to have been a defective 
blower motor in the duct system. Firemen were hampered 
in fighting the blaze by the weather — a 35-mile wind and 
20 below zero — which froze hose lines. 

WROC-TV (Ch. 5) Rochester, N.Y. is being sold for 
$6. 5-million by Transcontinent Television Corp. to Ch. 10 
share-timers WVET-TV & WHEC-TV. They will adjust 
their shares of the cost between them. WHEC-TV (owned 
by Gannett Co. Inc.) will wind up with Ch. 10. WVET-TV 
(owned by Veterans Bcstg. Co. Inc.; Ervin F. Lyke, pres. & 
treas. and largest stockholder) with Ch. 5. Transcontinent 
will be free to seek another vhf station elsewhere. Negotia- 
tions depend on satisfactory settlement of labor contracts. 

Westinghouse Bcstg. Co. Pres. Donald H. McGannon, 
who is also chmn. of the bcstrs. committee of the Bcstrs. for 
Radio Free Europe campaign, is announcing Jan. 30 that 
European trips will be awarded to the 4 stations offering 
the “greatest general support” during the Feb. 1-14 drive. 
Promotional material sent last week to all U.S. stations 
included film spots for TV, and 17 appeals (ranging from 
10-sec. to 3-min. announcements) for radio. 

NAB will sponsor the 6th annual conference of state 
broadcasters association presidents Feb. 22-23 at the 
Shoreham Hotel, Washington. NAB industry affairs vp 
Howard H. Bell will preside at the sessions, to which state 
groups have been urged to send more than one delegate. 
Expenses of one rep from each state will be paid by NAB. 
The second-day conference luncheon speaker will be NAB 
Pres. LeRoy Collins. 

WTOP-TV Washington & WJXT Jacksonville are in 
the final stage of negotiations to move their spot business 
to TV advertising representatives (TvAR), switching from 
CBS-TV Spot Sales which has been ordered out of the field 
by FCC. TvAR, owned by Westinghouse Bcstg. Co., cur- 
rently represents only the WBC stations. Also reported 
considering joining TvAR: WBTV Charlotte, N.C. & WBTW 
Florence, S.C. 

Fee system for licensees was again rejected recently 
by FCC in reply to request for comment by Budget Bureau. 



VOL. 17: No. 5 



15 



• • • • 



MANUFACTURING, DISTRIBUTION, FINANCE 



LABOR DECLARES WAR OH IMPORTS: Unprecedented boycott action against electronics 

imports launched by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers' largest Local, 1031 in Chicago (Vol. 
17:4 pl7), very likely will trigger a rash of similar moves by other labor groups in this & other industries. 
More significantly, IBEW's vote to handle no Japanese parts after May 1 unguestionably will influence con- 
tract negotiations in the electronics industry, will add impetus to moves for protective legislation. 

"You can bet your hat that negotiations with electronics firms will deal with imports from low- 
wage countries," an executive of international IBEW in Washington told us last week. Although he 
described the Windy City action as purely local & in no way a "test case," he does foresee other import- 
affected locals quickly adopting the boycott as a counter-offensive. 

"We've never had any objections to imports from England, West Germany and similar countries 
which produce quality products & components at costs comparable with ours," he pointed out. "However, 
products from Japan and other low-wage countries hurt everybody. They hurt Americans who make parts & 
components, they hurt Americans who assemble the finished products, they hurt Americans who buy these 
products which just don't have American quality." 

Encouraging responses & assurances already have come from "many" of the 132 Chicago-area TV- 
radio-electronics plants involved, Local 1031 Pres. Frank Darling told us. He added: "All the manufacturers 
wev'e heard from so far are in accord with our position. We have yet to hear from those who may not be. 
We've also had dozens of letters from other locals throughout the nation saluting our stand & supporting 
our move. We aren't against world trade. We certainly don't seek to injure U.S. manufacturers. What we 
do want is to focus public attention on the plight of our membership resulting from Japanese imports." 

For more on the IBEW boycott, see p. 17. 

PITTSBURGH BONDED TUBE BEING SHOWN: The die is just about cast for the so 

called "1962 models" — so it's unlikely there'll be any significant number of TV sets using either of the 2 new 
approaches to laminated-safety-shield picture tubes. Industry thus gets welcome breather & nearly a full 
year to test & evaluate the tubes sponsored by Pittsburgh Plate Glass & du Pont (Vol. 16:50 pl5, 16:52 p 1 6). 

Majority of 23-in. models will feature Corning laminated safety glass — although there will be plenty 
using conventional external glass, and a smattering (specifically Wells-Gardner, some Motorola & others) 
using "dry-seal" approach, in which curved safety glass is positioned between mask & picture tube by vinyl 
gasket (Vol. 16:48 pl4). Most 19-in. sets will use external glass or plastic implosion plates. 

Du Pont's bonded Mylar implosion shield continues to be controversial — and developmental. Manu- 
facturers are still awaiting production samples for evaluation. Pittsburgh's bonded-glass technique seems 
to be further along in development. 

Tube & set makers are taking good hard look at newly improved Pittsburgh process — which lamin- 
ates curved plate glass to front of picture tube. Pittsburgh has set up specially developed laminating equip- 
ment in its lab, invited tube makers to play with it. At least one tube manufacturer has set up its own 
machinery to turn out samples. Reactions aren't in yet, but consensus is that if Pittsburgh method makes 
possible cost savings it will find some adherents. (This is an especially relevant point right now, with prices 
of 19-in. bulbs & tubes due to rise March 1.) 

Pittsburgh claims to have achieved "significant reductions" in cost of both the gray glass & the resin 
used to cement it to face of tube. Final answer on costs will come when manufacturers have more experi- 
ence in sample production runs. 



f( 



JANUARY 30, 1961 



Process requires use of new Pittsburgh-developed taping machine in addition to modified standard 
tube laminating equipment. Here's how Pittsburgh safety glass is applied to tube: 

Picture tube is placed in machine face up. The cover window, or cap, is placed on tube, jigged for 
precise location. Cap is then raised by highly accurate suction-cup device so that it doesn't touch tube, leav- 
ing air space between tube & cap. Strip of 1-mil Mylar adhesive tape is wrapped around assembly where 
tube & cap join, forming seal around air cell. Tube is turned face down, warmed to 115-120° F. Resin is 
injected into air space between cap & tube under pressure of 60-70 lb. per sq. in. Resin sets in 15-20 minutes. 

Pit tsburgh's taping machine performs all operations automatically, at speed of little less than 3 tubes 
per minute. Pittsburgh will assist machine manufacturers in construction of machines, or can supply blue- 
prints, and offers to shake machines down in its own labs before delivery. 

TV-RADIO PRODUCTION: EIA statistics for week ended Jan. 20 (3rd week of 1961): 

Jan. 14-20 Preceding wk. 1960 wk. '61 cumulative '60 cumulative 



TV 100,152 100,889 141,303 251,894 384,292 

Total radio 257,037 282,186 354,098 734,127 971,451 

auto radio 82,389 104,576 143,371 276,354 456,888 



GOVT. SEES ELECTRONICS RISE: The Commerce Dept, 
last week predicted a record year for the electronics 
industry, as the Electronics Div. of its Business & 
Defense Services Administration issued its annual 
comprehensive Outlook & Review, based on industry 
opinions. The division, headed by Donald S. Parris, 
forecast a 6% increase in the value of electronics 
equipment output this year over 1960 and a 5% in- 
crease in total components (including tubes & semicon- 
ductors) . It estimated 1960’s equipment production at 
$6.4 billion, components at $3.28 billion, up from $5.79 
& $2.97 billion in 1959. (Equipment & component fig- 
ures can’t be totaled because of overlap due to com- 
ponents designed for original equipment.) 

BDSA reiterated the commonly accepted view that the 
first half of the year probably will be slower and the 2nd 
half stronger than last year. Summarizing BDSA’s view 
of 1961’s outlook in various electronics industry branches: 

Consumer products — Slightly higher than 1960, return- 
ing to seasonal pattern of nearly 60% of output produced 
in 2nd half. Black-&-white TV production to decline 
moderately to about 5.5 million units at $810-million factory 
value (from 5.72 million units in 1960). Factory sales of 
color sets “to increase substantially [and] may reach the 
$100-million mark.” Radio production & sales to be below 
1960 levels, partly due to a predicted decline in automobile 
production. FM equipment sales should increase. Phono 
output to “increase moderately.” Other consumer products 
— recorders, citizens radio, electronic ranges, electronic 
toys, garage-door openers, etc. — also expected to increase 
moderately. “The growth in 1961 in this sector of the elec- 
tronic industries, which has greater potential than any 
other major consumer-product area except color TV, will 
only be a beginning.” 

Military equipment & systems — Production to increase 
about 10%, “owing largely to increased electronics content 
of military weapons systems, rather than a general in- 
crease in military hard-goods production.” Military R&D 
expenditures to level off in 1961, but increase in 1962 as 
new generations of weapons systems undergo development. 

Commercial & industrial equipment — Substantial stim- 
ulation of microwave equipment sales because of FCC 
action making channels available to firms other than 
common carriers. Data-processing gear, production-control 



equipment & other aspects of this market “could be devel- 
oped even more rapidly by more aggressive product 
development & promotion.” 

Tubes — Output to continue at about 1960 levels. 

Semiconductors — Factory sales should rise to around 
$610 million, up from $535 million in 1959 and $395 million 
in 1958. 

Other components — Following upward trend in equip- 
ment output, and inventory replenishment by equipment 
manufacturers, factory sales to rise about 5% to $2 billion. 

In its review of 1960, BDSA noted that all segments 
shared in the 10% (factory output) advance over 1960, 
although consumer products rose only 2% — the 18% 
increase in phono production being the brightest spot in 
the consumer field. Military equipment sales increased 15%, 
commercial & industrial 10%, semiconductors 35%, tubes 
decreased 2%, other components increased 10% in value of 
factory shipments. 

BDSA gives this breakdown of 1960 electronics factory 
output: Consumer TV-radio & related products $1.83 
billion (up from $1.79 billion in 1959), all other electronic 
equipment $4.57 billion (up from $4 billion), tubes $845 
million (down from $865 million), semiconductors $535 
million (from $395 million), other components $1.9 billion 
(from $1.71 billion). 

Another table graphically shows the declining role of 
consumer products in the electronic-equipment complex. 
Whereas in 19.29 consumer goods comprised 97% of total 
electronic equipment, the percentage has declined to 29% 
in 1960. It was 30% in 1959. 

For BDSA’s comments & data on electronics foreign 
trade, see story on p. 17. 



New manufacturing process for selenium rectifiers, 
announced last week by GE, is claimed virtually to elimin- 
ate circuit failure and to be completely automatic. GE 
says that rectifiers made by this process — called “ACE” for 
automatic continuous evaporation — would have an operat- 
ing life of 80,000 hours or more. A refinement of a non- 
automatic German development, the ACE process uses 
a metal globe 4 ft. in diameter, lined with aluminum sheets 
to be coated chemically. The spheroid is sealed into an oven 
where the aluminum is automatically plated with a series 
of electrode layers, eliminating human error. GE says 
ACE will obsolete other methods of making the rectifiers. 



VOL. 17: No. S 



17 



more about 

IBEW VS. IMPORTS: An interesting & significant show- 

down is shaping up in Chicago between IBEW’s Local 
1031 & users of electronic components imported from 
Japan (see p. 15). The local has notified 132 TV-radio- 
electronics employers that after May 1 the union mem- 
bership will refuse to handle parts brought in from 
low-wage countries (Vol. 17:4 pl7). 

The foreign invasion, local Pres. Frank Darling repoi’ts, 
has brought distress to his membership and many of 
their employers also are suffering from the competition. 
The local’s membership in the past 2 years has dropped 
from 47,000 to 23,000. In 1960’s final quarter alone, 5,700 
members lost their jobs. 

“The workers in our radionic industries have now 
decided that they will not remain passive & helpless as 
they witness the erosion of their working standards & the 
disappearance of their jobs & working opportunities result- 
ing from the impact of this unfair foreign competition,” 
the union wrote the employers. “Moreover, these employes 
believe that your self-interest as an employer, in this 
situation, would actually be best served by your continuing 
purchase of American-made products.” 

Darling reports that favorable responses already have 
been received from “many” manufacturers. However, 
direct comments from them are hard to come by. It is 
known, however, that one of IBEW’s largest employers, 
Webcor, has posted a bulletin-board notice to the effect 
that its agrees “wholeheartedly with the Buy-American” 
concept and is taking every measure to replace its made-in- 
Japan parts with U.S. products. Chicago’s majors aren’t 
involved: Motorola is non-union, Zenith has no IBEW 

contract and doesn’t import, and Admiral wouldn’t be 
caught dead with a Japanese component. 

Experts tell us that in their opinion the IBEW boycott 
stands on a thin legal leg, and the strong odds are that 
the boycott is unenforceable. However, union officials are 
confident that the threat of a boycott will succeed as 
a moral persuader and won’t get entangled with Taft- 
Hartley and/or Landrum-Griffin law provisions. In short, 
IBEW stands in a highly favorable & sympathetic position 
— right under the American flag. As Frank Darling told us: 
“we don’t feel bad about competition from countries which 
pay about the same wages as we do. However, when com- 
petition from low-wage countries takes jobs away from 
Americans, it’s time to take protective measures. We 
are not opposed to imports — only to unfair competition.” 

* * * 

President Kennedy expressed concern at last week’s 
TV press conference “about those imports which adversely 
affect an entire industry, or adversely affect the employ- 
ment of a substantial number of our citizens.” Asked his 
position on a proposal for abolishment of all restraints of 
the Reciprocal Trade Agreements Act, he stated, however: 
“I do think we should realize that the balance of trade has 
been in our favor and the gold flow would have been sub- 
stantially worse if we had not had this favorable balance of 
trade.” 

* * * 

Japanese electronic imports are a “serious problem” to 
U.S. manufacturers, Rep. Pucinski (D-Ill.) assui'ed the 
House in urging support for his bill (HR-1070) to adjust 
import tariffs & quotas to competitive wage differentials 
abroad (Vol. 17:2 p3). The text of a NARDA convention 
speech by Admiral Pres. Ross Siragusa, spelling out dan- 
gers of foreign competition (Vol. 17:4 p 16), was inserted 
in the Jan. 25 Congressional Record by Pucinski. 



But Exports Are Rising, Too: Alarm over the rapid in- 

crease in electronics imports (see p. 15) sometimes obscures 
the fact that America’s electronics balance-of-trade is 
favorable, exports exceeding imports by more than 4 to 1. 
U.S. exports of electronic products in 1960 were estimated 
last week by the Commerce Dept, to have exceeded $450 
million — more than 12% over 1959. The Department’s 
Business & Defense Services Administration predicts that 
the U.S. electronics export mai-ket “may well approach the 
half-billion-dollar level in 1961.” 

Electronics imports also set a record — $103 million, or 
25% over 1959 — in 1960. BDSA sees no slackening in the 
import of consumer end products in 1961 and predicts con- 
tinued increase in component imports. 

While a large part of the increase in imports is 
represented by consumer products, consumer exports have 
fallen off. Total U.S. electronics exports rose from $401 
million in 1959 to $454 million in 1960, but' exports of 
consumer electronic products dropped from $76 million to 
$70 million. Every major category of consumer electronics 
(except recorders) saw a falling-off from 1959 to 1960. TV 
sets went down from $18 million to $14 million. Home & 
auto radios and phonos also declined. 

The other 2 major categories of electronics exports 
increased in each of the 2 years, however. Commercial- 
industrial-military equipment exports rose from $211 mil- 
lion in 1959 to $245 million in 1960. Within this category, 
TV-radio broadcast equipment went up from $18 million in 
1959 to $20 million last year. Components (including tubes 
& semiconductors) increased from $113 to $139 million. 

The $103 million in electronics imports last year com- 
pares with $82 million in 1959 and $34 million in 1958. The 
category “radio apparatus & parts” accounted for about 
90% of the imports in 1960 — $91.5 million (an increase from 
$72.7 million in 1959). Increases over 1959 were shown 
last year in imports of TV cameras & parts ($1 million vs. 
$227,000), TV tubes & parts ($500,000 vs. $387,000), “other 
TV apparatus & parts” ($91.5 million vs. $72.7 million), 
tubes & tube parts ($2.4 million vs. $1.4 million). 



Emertron Inc. has begun operation as a wholly-owned 
subsidiary of Emerson Radio, acquiring all assets & busi- 
ness of Emerson’s govt. & industrial electronics div. in 
exchange for 2 million shares of common stock. Emertron, 
headquartei-ed at Jersey City, N.J., has an authorized 
capital of 250,000 shares of pfd. & 5 million shares of 
common stock. Emerson Pres. Benjamin Abrams said 
Emertron’s contract backlog is about $30 million and that 
its staff has more than 1,000 persons. Officers of Emertron, 
announced last week: Morton P. Rome (Emerson vp), 
pres.; Dr. Harold Goldberg (ex-Emerson vp in charge of 
research labs), exec, vp; A. A. Vogel, (Emerson vp-con- 
troller), secy.-treas.; Leonard S. Hermelin, vp; George 
Rappaport, mktg. vp; Stanley Schneider, vp. Board of 
directors (all Emerson or Emertron officers): Rear Adm. 
John D. Small (ret.) ehmn.; Benjamin Abrams, Max 
Abi’ams, Dr. Goldberg, Dorman D. Israel, Rome, Vogel. 

Tuner makers Standard Kollsman and Sarkes Tarzian 
have extended warranties from 90 days to a full year for 
their TV & FM tuners. The extension is in recognition of 
the longer warranties now being offered to consumers by set 
manufacturers. Prices are unchanged. 

Wells Electronic Co. Inc., Cedarhurst, N.Y., has signed 
an FTC consent order prohibiting the Long Island firm 
from misrepresenting rebuilt TV picture tubes as new. The 
agreement settled a 1960 FTC complaint (Vol. 16:38 pl9). 



16 



JANUARY 30, 1961 



New models: Ampex offers its lowest-priced consumer 
products to date — two 4-track stereo tape players (not 
recorders) designed for use with hi-fi installations. They 
are priced at $199.50 (without preamplifiers) & $249.50, to 
be used with separate amplifiers • Arvin announces lower 
prices on its new radios, including 6-transistor miniature 
with case, battery & earphone at $24.95 (last year’s 
“comparable” model $39.95), same without accessories, 
$19.95; seven-transistor leather-covered portable, $34.95 
(last year $54.95); seven-transistor miniature, with acces- 
sories, $29.95 (from $41.95); clock radio, $19.95 ($24.95) • 
Packard Bell introduces 5 TVs — 19-in. portable at $189.95, 
two 23-in. Roto-Remote sets at $339.95 & $389.95, two 23-in. 
consoles at $269.95 & $309.95 — plus 6 stereo AM-FM con- 
soles at $249.95 to $565 (for reverb model). Distributor- 
dealer showings will be held in San Francisco (Jan. 30), 
Seattle (Feb. 1), Albuquerque (Feb. 3) • Motorola an- 

nounces a line of custom & universal auto antennas. 

Industrial electronic-equipment sales statistics will be 
compiled quarterly by EIA, under a new program estab- 
lished by the manufacturer association’s Industrial Elec- 
tronics Max-keting Data Committee. Data will be reported 
by participating manufacturers, and assembled by EIA, in 
these major categories: Testing & measuring equipment; 
computing & processing equipment; control & processing 
equipment; communications & navigational aids; miscel- 
laneous equipment, including medical electronics, power 
supplies, etc. The first report, covering 1960, will be 
followed by the quarterly reports, to be distributed to 
reporting companies. 

What is a “small business” in the electronics industry ? 
The Small Business Administration will conduct hearings 
in Washington Feb. 21 to consider revisions in the size 
standards for electronics-electrical industry businesses to 
fit within the small-business definition. The definition is 
important since it determines which firms are eligible for 
assistance from SBA in the form of business loans & govt, 
procurement aid. Those wishing to participate in the 
hearings have been requested to file written statements or 
notify SBA of their intention to make an oral statement. 
Dir. Samuel S. Solomon of the Office of Small Business Size 
Standards, SBA, Washington 25, is in charge. 

Expansion of Philco’s Colombia licensee Industrias 
Nacionales de Enseres Electricos S.A. (INDELSA), Bogota, 
will be financed by Philadelphia International Investment 
Corp., a subsidiary of Philadelphia National Bank, under a 
$450,000 investment program, providing an option for the 
investment company to acquire shares in the Colombian 
firm. Proceeds will be used to develop new product lines, 
including TV & home appliances, and to expand current 
lines of tube & transistor radios. Philco owns a minority 
interest in INDELSA, whose directors include Philco Inter- 
national Pres. Harvey Williams and W. S. Rolston, dir., 
Latin American operations, Philco Corp. S.A. (Switzerland). 

Herold Radio & Electronics Corp. went into bank- 
ruptcy last week, and a spokesman said its assets will be 
sold at public auction to settle outstanding debts. The 
company had failed in an attempt to continue operations 
under Chapter XI of the Bankruptcy Act. Herold estimated 
secured debts at $2.5 million, non-secured debts at $2 mil- 
lion, outstanding debentures of $1.5 million — totaling about 
$6 million. American Stock Exchange suspended trading 
in Herold stock following the bankruptcy declaration. 
Steelman Phonograph & Radio Co. and Roland Radio Corp. 
are wholly owned Herold subsidiaries. 



Canadian TV sales to dealers dropped again in No- 
vember — to 35,469 units from 46,125 a year ago and 44,812 
in Oct. 1960. The yeai'-to-date volume totaled 311,380, 
compared with 373,757 TVs sold in 1959’s first 11 months. 
The 11-month breakdown (1959 figures in parentheses): 
Portables, 58,865 (63,629); table models, 62,821 (98,905); 
consoles, 173,496 (198,443); combinations, 16,198 (12,780). 
For November (vs. Nov. 1959): Portables, 7,013 (7,244); 
table models, 6,869 (13,368); consoles, 19,018 (23,366); 
combinations, 2,569 (2,147). 

New plants & expansions: GE’s computer dept, will 
build a $4-million addition to its hq & manufacturing- 
facility near Phoenix. Construction is slated to start in 
April, be completed early in 1962 • Jerrold Electronics 
has increased the area of its Huntingdon Valley, Pa. lab to 
moi'e than 20,000 sq. ft. • Harman-Kardon has formally 
opened its new 52,000-sq.-ft. hq at Plainview, N.Y. • 
National Video has occupied the 50,000-sq.-ft. addition to 
its Chicago picture-tube plant, which increases its pro- 
duction capacity by about 15%. 

Hoffman Electronics has established an international 
trade dept., headed by former patent attorney Bruce L. 
Birchard as intex-national trade director. Hoffman’s poten- 
tial “in many world markets is greater today than at any 
time in the past,” commented Pres. H. Leslie Hoffman, 
adding: “Our new international trade dept, will be respon- 
sible for capitalizing on this potential in the corporation’s 
area of interest and will be responsible for coordinating 
related interests of Hoffman’s 5 divisions in the inter- 
national field.” 

Magnavox will close its Greeneville, Tenn. cabinet 
plant this week because of high operating costs. Pres. 
Fi-ank Fi-eimann said that cabinets are available from 
“outside sources” at prices below Magnavox’s production 
costs. The company closed its Paducah, Ky. loudspeaker & 
capacitor production plant earlier this month (Vol. 17 :2 
p. 15). The shutdowns were protested by IUE Pres. James B. 
Cax-ey in a demand for a 2-state investigation of the com- 
pany’s policies. In telegrams to Ky. Gov. Burt Combs & 
Tenn. Gov. Bufox*d Ellington, he asked for appointment of 
a joint commission. The union, Carey said, wanted to 
protect IUE members against unemployment and to “fore- 
stall the resultant crises in these communities.” 

Sylvania will close its Mill Hall, Pa. receiving-tube 
production plant over the next 6 months and transfer its 
production operations to other facilities. Matthew D. 
Burns, Sylvania senior vp & electronic tube div. pres., said 
that the abolition of the oldest of Sylvania’s 6 receiving- 
tube plants will not affect total production capacity. 

FM stereo standards are at least 2 months fi-om FCC 
approval. The Commission isn’t expected to consider them 
again for a month or so. After that, it could take another 
month or more for a final decision to be drafted & issued. 
That’s the minimum, of course. The process could run into 
several months moi-e, as it usually does in such matters. 

Model-year tag would be required on all TVs, radios, 
phonos & appliances if a model year is used by the 
manufacturer, under a bill filed in the N.Y. state senate by 
Sen. Hunter Meighan. The proposal would also require the 
model year to be included in all advertising. 

Electronics Leasing Corp. is the new name of Tel- 
Hotel Corp., which retains its quarters at 342 Madison Ave., 
New York, N.Y. The company rents TVs, radios & elec- 
tronic systems to hotels, hospitals and others. 



VOL. 17: No. 5 



13 



Trade Personals: Dr. Bernhard E. Bartels elected GT&E 
Labs vp and appointed research dir. of the company’s Bay- 
side (N.Y.) labs (formerly Sylvania labs), succeeding Dr. 
Robert M. Bowie, who has been assigned to GT&E Labs 
N.Y. hq staff . . . George P. Lyon appointed marketing 
administrator, C. John Borlaug promoted to chief service 
engineer, Sylvania Home Electronics Corp.; Borlaug suc- 
ceeds Donald E. Winters, now mgr. of quality control for 
the home electronics div. 

Norman R. Huey, former merchandising mgr., named 
to new post of mgr. of new-product projects, GE radio 
receiver dept.; Andrew E. Kimball, GE receiving tube mgr. 
of mktg. research, named mktg. research mgr. of GE elec- 
tronic components div.’s new advanced product planning 
operation . . . Robert H. Eddington named asst, secy., 
Hoffman Electronics; William D. Van Dyke named gen. 
mgr. of Hoffman’s new instruments div. 

N. A. Anderson, former Havana distributor (Distrib- 
uidora Electro Mecanica Industrial), elected pres., Westing- 
house Electric Co. S.A. (Westinghouse’s sales & service 
subsidiary for Latin America & Canada, headquartered in 
Puerto Rico). He succeeds J. H. Compton, resigned. 

Max Lehrer, former asst, staff dir., Senate Committee 
on Aeronautical & Space Sciences, named to new RCA post 
of defense-business development dir., RCA defense elec- 
tronic-products div Herbert T. Brunn named div. vp, 

RCA international operations. 

John F. Dabrowski, ex-Motorola & Raytheon, named 
commercial sales mgr., .Gabriel Electronics . . . Curtis A. 
Haines, ex-Sylvania Electronic Tubes vp, named product & 
facilities planning vp, Sylvania Electronic Systems . . . 
Ronald J. Gray promoted to ad & PR mgr., Servo-mechan- 
isms Inc., succeeding Warren C. Wilson, who has become 
Eitel-McCullough ad & sales promotion mgr. 

D. Scott Bowman, ex-Carborundum Corp., appointed 
mktg. dir., Amphenol-Borg . . . Alfred Akeroyd promoted 
to mgr. of licensee services, International Resistor. 

H. Raymond Jacobus, ex-Tung Sol & RCA, named mgr., 
Eitel-McCullough negative grid-tube div. . . . Harold R. 
Terhune, ITT Federal Labs, elected pres., Standards Engi- 
neers Society . . . Paul May promoted from housewares 
buyer to merchandise mgr. (TV-radio-appliances), Gimbels, 
N.Y., replacing Richard Falcone. 



Distributor Notes: Admiral names Legum Distribut- 
ing Co. for Baltimore, replacing Kaufman Distributors 
Inc. • Robert A. Rosen, ad & sales promotion mgr., Zenith 
Radio Corp. of N.Y., a 2nd lieutenant in the N.Y. Air Na- 
tional Guard, named 105th Fighter Group information- 
services officer • Craig Electronics Inc. is new name of 
Keirulff & Co., Southern Cal. Motorola distributor, which 
has been acquired by Craig Corp. (Robert Craig). The 
former Kierulff organization remains intact, Craig drop- 
ping disti'ibution of the Columbia phono line, which hence- 
forth will be handled by a factory branch • Dan Jacobs 
elected sales vp, Motorola products, Cooper Distributing 
Co., Newark • Charles H. Belzer named gen. mgr - ., Rob- 
ert J. Flanagan Milwaukee district sales mgr., Sylvania 
Home Electronics Corp. • Astrex Inc., exclusive distrib- 
utor of Du Mont tubes, will merge with Radio Electric 
Service Co., Philadelphia parts jobber. 

Obituary 

Karl William Waferson, 85, former AT&T vp for per- 
sonnel relations, died Jan. 24 after a long illness. He was 
a dir. of Bell Labs. Surviving are a son and daughter. 



Finance 

Emerson Profit-Sales Sag: Emerson Radio & Phonograph 

experienced a 41.5% drop in earnings on a 5.5% decline in 
sales in its 1960 fiscal year ended Oct.. 31 (see financial 
table). Pres. Benjamin Abrams said the profit drop “was 
due in considerable measure to substantially lower sales of 
transistor radios. The huge increase in imports of tran- 
sistor radios from Japan . . . has seriously affected all 
domestic producers.” 

Other factors in Emerson’s profit & sales setback: (1) 
The general business fall-off in the 2nd half; (2) payment 
of $475,000 to Mrs. Edwin H. Armstrong in settlement of 
her suit charging infringement of her late husband’s FM 
patents (Vol. 16:8 pl9) ; (3) cancellation by the govt, of a 
contract on which Emerson had spent $2.3 million. The 
company is disputing the govt, cancellation, executed “for 
alleged failure to meet contract specifications.” 

Abrams noted that unit sales of Emerson TVs were 
“moderately lower” than in the preceding fiscal year, but 
profits were “substantially unchanged.” He reported in- 
creased sales for the higher-priced Du Mont TV line. “Our 
1960 sales volume of air-conditioning room units was more 
than double the sales of the previous year,” Abrams said. 
“The backlog of the govt.-electronics div. is more than 
50% higher than at the end of fiscal 1959.” Looking to the 
year ahead, Emerson’s president said he was confident the 
industry “would soon resume its normal gi'owth pattern.” 
* * * 

Mergers & acquisitions: American Electronics and 
Electronic Specialty have canceled their merger plans (Vol. 
17:1 p20) because “we simply weren’t able to agree on a 
ratio for the exchange of stock,” reports American’s 
Pres. Philip Zonne. Electronic Specialty Pres. William H. 
Burgess says the merger breakdown does not affect his 
company’s planned amalgamation with D. S. Kennedy Co., 
Cohasset, Mass. • Sonotone and Loral Electronics report- 
edly have had preliminary discussions about a merger • 
Amphenol-Borg Electronics will purchase for $475,000 from 
Toronto-based Aimer Co. 50,000 shares of Borg Fabrics 
Ltd., Elmira, Ont. which it owns jointly with the Toronto 
concern • Ling-Temco Electronics has offered to purchase 
all Chance Vought common stock which is offered before 
3 p.m. Feb. 1 (Vol. 17:4 pl9) • Douglas Aircraft and 
Midwestern Instruments (Magnecord tape recorders) are 
negotiating to “give Douglas a substantial interest in 
Midwestern through acquisition of newly issued stock.” 

Westinghouse’s total 1960 income declined from the 
1959 level despite a moderate sales rise (see financial table). 
Pres. Mark W. Cresap Jr. reported that “billings on all 
product groups in 1960 exceeded or approximately matched 

1959 sales except for consumer products, where an indus- 
try-wide decline of 5% in sales from 1959 levels has been 
reported.” Looking ahead, he said Westinghouse expects 
an “increasingly tighter squeeze on earnings” in 1961’s 
first half because of “inflation in material & employment 
costs, coupled with the general price softening.” 

IBM plans a split of its common stock — an additional 
half share for each share held — subject to stockholder 
approval at the April 25 annual meeting. If the proposal 
is approved, IBM will begin distribution of the new shares 
as of a May 5-effective date. 

Jerrold’s annual report for the fiscal year ended Feb. 

1960 received a “Best of the Year” award at the Graphic 
Arts Exhibit of Delaware County in Philadelphia Jan. 19. 



20 



JANUARY 30, 1961 



Financial Reports of TV-Electronics Companies 

These are latest reports as obtained during the last week. Dash indicates the information was not available at press time. Parentheses denote loss. 



Company 


Period 


Sales 


Acme Electric 


1960 — 6 mo. to Dec. 31 

1959 — 6 mo. to Dec. 31 


$ 5,374,270 

5,173,000 


Arco Electronics 


1960 — year to Sept. 30 

1959 — year to Sept. 30 


2,530,221 

1,999,309 


Avco 


1960 — year to Nov. 30 
1959 — year to Nov. 30 


322,744,957 

306,048,377 


Beckman Instruments 


1960 — 6 mo. to Dec. 31 

1959 — 6 mo. to Dec. 31 

1960 — qtr. to Dec. 31 
1959 — qtr. to Dec. 31 


31,423,505 

25,442,965 

16,362,807 

12,804,650 


Daystrom 


1960 — 9 mo. to Dec. 31 
.1959 — 9 mo. to Dec. 31 
1960 — qtr. to Dec. 31 
1959 — qtr. to Dec. 31 


68.756.000 

65.524.000 

24.180.000 

24.174.000 


Electro-Voice 


1960 — 9 mo. to Nov. 30 
1959 — 9 mo. to Nov. 30 


7,415,992 

7,738,375 


Emerson Radio 

Story on p. 19 


1960 — year to Oct. 31 
1959 — year to Oct. 31 


63,776,658 

67,442,399 


Packard-Bell 


1960 — qtr. to Dec. 31 
1959 — qtr. to Dec. 31 


8,738,350 

13,305,018 


Raytheon 


1960 — year to Dec. 31' 
1959 — year to Dec. 31 


539,975,000° 

494,278,000 


Seeburg 


1960 — year to Oct. 31 
1959 — year to Oct. 31 


27,175,865 

22,632,567 


Taft Bcstg. 


1960 — qtr. to Dec. 31 
1959 — qtr. to Dec. 31 


3,082,588 

2,866,943 


Westinghouse 

Story on p. 19 


1960 — year to Dec. 31' 

1959 — year to Dec. 31 

1960 — qtr. to Dec. 31' 
1959— qtr. to Dec. 31 


1.955.731.000 

1.910.730.000 

498.498.000 

502.337.000 



Pre-Tax 

Earnings 


Net Earnings 


Per 

Common 

Share 


Common 

Shares 




$ 212,820 


$0.80’ 






205,800 


.77 l 






280,304 


.33 







168,121 


.20 




$ 19,300,001 


10,021,501 


.97 


10,301,956 


18,488,416 


9,588,416 


,95 l 


10,056,186 




1,586,010 


1.15 


1,381,123 




1,262,172 


.93 


1,363,094 




844,996 


.61 


1,381,123 




639,656 


.47 


1,363,094 


2,111,000 


1,121,000 


.89* 


1,255,307 


2,854,000 


1,405,000 


1.12* 


914,013 




248,000 


.19’ 


1,255,307 




' 603,000 


.48* 


914,013 




8,061 


.02 


473,650 




167,792 


.35 


473,650 


3,250,196 


1,686,568" 


.80” 


2,119,685 


5,551,214 


2,668,682 


1.26° 


2,049,043 


(590.168) 7 


(365,969) 


— 


813,433 


943,592 


443,592 


.56 


795,500 


15,775,000 


11,536,000 s 


3.01 1 


3,728,247 


21,801,000 


13,481,188° 


3.89* 


3,243,567 




915,262 


.70 


1,304,982 




1,929,770 


1.64 


1,177,646 




458,190 


.31 


1,488,186 




517,401 


.35 


1,488,186 


144,957,000 


79,057,000 


2.22* 


34,813,842 


152,351,000 


85,947,000’° 


2.43 1 


34,679,456'* 




18,377,000 


.52* 


34,813,842 




29,722,000”-' 


.84 l 


34,679,456'* 



Notes: 'After preferred dividends. -Preliminary. “Record. 'Based on 

1,255,307 shares outstanding Dec. 31, I960. “After $475,000 settlement 
of patent infringement suit. “Based on 2,119,685 shares outstanding Oct. 
31, 1960. 'Before $224,200 tax credit. “Including $6,649,000 in special 



items. “Including $3 million in special items. '“Including $17,186,000 
in special items. "Adjusted for Jan.-1960 2-for-l split. "'Including 
$7,196,000 in special items. 



Reports & comments available: Lab for Electronics, 
report, Winslow, Cohu & Stetson, 26 Broadway, N.Y. 4 • 
Yardney Electric, analysis, Carter, Berlind, Potoma & 
Weill, 37 Wall St., N.Y. 5 • Emerson Electric Mfg. (St. 
Louis), prospectus, Carl M. Loeb, Rhoades & Co., 42 Wall 
St., N.Y. 5 • Vacuum-Electronics, prospectus, Lehman 

Brothers, One William St., N.Y. 4. 

Transitron Electronic Corp. is setting aside 315,000 
common stock shares for option-plan offerings to executives 
& key employes, according to an SEC registration state- 
ment (File 2-17505). 



Common Stock Dividends 

Stk. of 



Corporation 


Period 


Amt. 


Payable 


Record 


Burroughs 


Q 


$0.25 


Apr. 


20 


Mar. 


25 


Canadian GE 


Q 


2.00 


Apr. 


3 


Mar. 


15 


Desilu Productions . . . . 


Q 


.15 


Feb. 


24 


Feb. 


10 


Electronic Engineering. 




.10 


Mar. 


20 


Feb. 


6 


Electronics Investment. 


— 


.03 


Feb. 


27 


Feb. 


1 


IBM 


Q 


.75 


Mar. 


10 


Feb. 


10 


National Video “A” . . . 


Q 


.22% 


Feb. 


24 


Feb. 


3 


Raytheon 


Stk. 


3% 


Mar. 


17 


Feb. 


23 


Sperry Rand 


Stk. 


2% 


Mar. 


30 


Feb. 


9 


Stanley Warner 


Q 


.30 


Feb. 


24 


Feb. 


8 


Stewart-Warner 


Q 


.35 


Mar. 


11 


Feb. 


17 


Standard Radio Ltd. . . 


Q 


.20 


Apr. 


10 


Mar. 


20 


Tung-Sol 


Q 


.17% 


Mar. 


2 


Feb. 


13 


Westinghouse 


Q 


.30 


Mar. 


1 


Feb. 


<; 


TV-Electronics Fund . . 


— 


.04 


Feb. 


28 


Feb. 


2 



OVER-THE-COUNTER 
COMMON STOCK QUOTATIONS 

Thursday, January 26, 1961 



Stock. 


Bid Asked 


Stock 


Bia Asked 


Acoustica Associates _ 


20' i* 


22 Vi 


Maxson (W.L.) 


10% 


11% 


Aerovox _ - _ _ 


814 


9% 


Meredith Pub. 


41% 


44% 


Allied Radio _ 


2214 


24 *8 


Metropolitan Bcstg. 


20% 


22% 


Astron Corp. _ 


1% 


2V4 


Narda Microwave 


5% 




Baird Atomic 


20 Vi 


22 


Nuclear of Chicago 


38% 


41% 


Cetron Electric 


5% 


6 


Official Films 


2% 3-1/16 


Control Data Corp. 


70 % 


74% 


Pacific Automation 


4% 


5% 


Cook Elec. 


13 '4 


14% 


Pacific Mercury _ 


6% 


7% 


Craig Systems _ 


13% 


15 Vi 


Philips Lamp 


151% 


157% 


Dictaphone 


34 1 j 


37 Vi 


Pyramid Electric 


3% 3 


-9/16 


Digitronics 


21 ’i 


23% 


Radiation Inc. 


28 


30% 


Eastern Ind. 


15 % 


16% 


Howard W. Sams . - 


44% 


48 


Eitel-McCullough 


18 Vi 


20% 


Sanders Associates 


39% 


42% 


Elco Corp. 


16 “4 


18 is 


Silicon Transistor 


5 


5% 


Electro Instruments 


25 >3 


28 >4 


Soroban Engineering _ 


46 


50% 


Electro Voice 


9 


10 


Soundscriber _ _ 


14% 


16% 


Electronic Associates _ 


28 


30 Vs 


Speer Carbon 


19 


20% 


Erie Resistor 


1 1 Vs 


12 


Sorague Electric 


54 '4 


57% 


Executone 


20 


22 


Sterling TV _ 


1'4 


1% 




26% 


28 >4 




12% 

39% 


13% 

42% 


Foto-Video 


3 3 


-9/16 


Taylor Instrument 


FXR __ 


36 


39% 


Technology Inst. 


6% 


7% 


General Devices 


9 Vi 


10% 


Telechrome 


12% 


13 % 




8 


9% 


Tplprnmpnt.insr 


7 


7*4 


Gross Telecasting 


21 


23 


Telemeter _ _ 


10%. 


n% 


Hallicrafters 


34 


36% 


Time Inc. _ _ _ 


83 


87% 


Hewlett-Packard 


28% 


30% 


Tracerlab ___ 


8% 


10 


Hiah Voltage 


177 


187 


United Artists - _ 


5% 


6% 


Infrared Industries __ 


13 Vi 


14% 


United Control - - 


15% 


17 


Interstate Engineering 


20 


21 % 


Universal Trans. 


% 1 


-3 '16 


Itek __ _ - 


51 


55% 


Vitro _ - 


14 


15 


Jerrold _ .. 


7 '4 


8 


Vocaline _ 


2% 3 


-1/16 


Dab for Electronics - 


50 


53% 


W.1R Goodwill Station 


11 


— 


Tel Inc. ... 


5 


5 : U 


Wells-Oardner _ . . 


23 %• 


25% 


Magna Theater 

Magnetics Inc. __ — 


2% 3 
7 Vi 


-3 16 
8% 


Wometco Ent. 


13 % 


14 Vi 




WEEKLY 



Television Digest 



FEBRUARY 6, 1961 



1961 TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. 



VOL. 17: No. 6 



The authoritative service for executives in all branches of the tel 

— 



i 1 !!! 



sion arts & industries 



SUMMARY-INDEX OF WEEK'S NEWS 



FCC 

FCC WRAPS UP PITCH FOR VHF-UHF SET LAW; adds emphasis 
on uhf ETV; delates outline of step-by-step program (p. 1). 
MINOW "NOT PREJUDGING" FCC 4 INDUSTRY PROBLEMS; says 
he's waiting until he studies. Confirmation hearing to consider 
both short & long terms Feb. 8 (p. 1). Dept. (p. 13). 

Congress 

SEC. 315 REVISION SEEMS SURE as result of Senate hearings on 
broadcasters' 1960 political behavior. NAB, networks and FCC 
recite industry's equal-time record (p. 2). Dept. (p. 13). 

FCC'S FORM 324 DENOUNCED by NAB & other protestants for 
requiring "most confidential" financial data from stations which 
could be damaging competitively (p. 3). 

Stations 

MURROW— VOICE OF "THE VOICE"— may become powerful 
spokesman for U.S. He is expected to attract other able newsmen 
to USIA, possibly ex-CBS top-kicks (p. 3). 

KFOY-TV (CH. 9) HOT SPRINGS. ARK., Donald Reynolds' 4th TV 
outlet, began Feb. 1. Reports on other upcoming stations as 
received from principals (p. 12). 

Networks 

MICKELSON & DAY QUIT CBS; Salant & Clark lake over in net- 
work's news dept, shakeup (p. 10). 

NOVEMBER BILLINGS increased 9.7% to $64 million from $58.3 
million in Nov. 1959. Year-to-date business climbed to $621.7 
million — 9.3% ahead of Ian. -Nov. 1959's $568.6 million (p. 10). 



Consumer Electronics 

IMPORTS — NO LET-UP, no "solution" in sight. Last year's imports 
from Japan exceeded 1959 by 40%. Industry leaders see further 
increases. Views in cross-section survey (pp. 15 & 17). 

GIANNINI BUYS CONRAC; International Resistance buys con- 
trol of North American Electronics; other mergers (p. 16). 

Advertising 

LANDIS IS NO CZAR, he tells Federal Bar Assn. & AFA; says he 
plans to "coordinate," help develop national policies, and elimi- 
nate "fragmentation" among agencies (p. 4). 

SCHICK SHAVES OFF TV by switching its $3.5 million 1961 bud- 
get into a Sunday-supplements campaign (p. 5). 

Film & Tape 

PRODUCERS & IATSE MAKE PEACE: Their compromise paves the 
way for a new 4-year contract. I A gets 10% wage hike, cut of 
post-1960 movies sold to TV, better pension (p. 8). 

MGM-TV PRESENTS THE BRIDE — showcasing its new half-hour 
pilot with a $200,000 film presentation (p. 8). 

Finance 

ZENITH's 4TH QUARTER was down from a year ago, but 1960 
closed out as the 2nd best year in the company's history (p. 19). 

Other Departments 

PROGRAMMING (p. 6). TECHNOLOGY (p. 7). AUXILIARY 
SERVICES (p. 11). PERSONALS (p. 14). ETV (p. 14). 



FCC WRAPS UP PITCH FOR VHF-UHF SET LAW: FCC has finally agreed on its all- 

channel-set recommendations to Congress, it's understood (Vol. 17:5 pi), and has sent them on to the Budget 
Bureau for customary checking (and expected customary approval). 

Final recommendations removed the step-by-step program previously under consideration — but basic 
thinking is the same: Nation needs all 82 channels, and all-channel-set legislation is the best way to breathe 
life into uhf. Reason for elimination of specific steps, it's said, is that Commission decided there's no point in 
trying to outline them until legislation is enacted to make them feasible. Commission also beefed up its ETV- 
uhf pitch, stating: 

"The only hope for an adequate ETV service lies in full utilization of the 70 uhf channels which are 
not now being fully exploited. So long as most generally available commercial receivers are limted to vhf, 
educators will be reluctant to go forward with a program for extensive use of uhf." 

MINOW 'NOT PREJUDGING' FCC INDUSTRY PROBLEMS: FCC Chmn.-designate 

Newton N. Minow, whose Senate confirmation hearing comes this week (Feb. 8), tells us he's still withholding 
any judgment on Commission & industry problems. "I've been quoted saying things I never said," he 
remarked with a laugh. 

As is customary in such situations, industry is speculating — with vigor — about his purported position 
on major matters. But Minow insists he has none. For example, one rumor is that "he's against program 



2 



FEBRUARY 6, 1961 



ratings." Answer: "That's not correct. I haven't formed a judgment on it." In an interview on WBKB Chicago 
recently, he said he's interested in seeing an improvement in programming. "That's true, of course," he said 
last week. "I guess we can all agree on that." 

Summing up, he said: "I'm waiting until I get to Washington and study the problems. I'm not 
prejudging anything." He said he has talked to several people in terms of spotting them in top FCC staff jobs 
— "but nothing definite until I'm confirmed." As for speculation that Administration wants to replace an incum- 
bent Democrat with a Kennedy appointee, to give Minow greater support: "I know nothing about that." 

His hearing before Sen. Magnuson's Commerce Committee will be on both the term expiring June 30 
and the new 7-year term extending from then. Indications are he'll get a warm reception, quick confirmation. 

SEC. 315 REVISION SEEMS SURE: Broadcasters got straight-" A" report cards last week from 
Senate examiners who graded them on civics, deportment, effort and performance during last year's 
Presidential election campaign. 

"A job well done," said Chmn. Pastore (D-R.I.) even before he began questioning NAB, networks and 
FCC at the 2-day Commerce Communications Subcommittee hearings. Subject: political lessons of the tem- 
porary suspension of equal-time requirements for 1960 Presidential tickets (Vol. 17:5 p8). 

"I want to congratulate the networks and the broadcasting industry for the notable contribution which 
you have made," said always critical & usually suspicious Sen. Yarborough (D-Tex.), whose own equal-time 
"watchdog" Subcommittee plans another set of hearings this month. Sen. McGee (D-Wyo.) said his "mis- 
givings" had been dispelled. 

Similar sentiments were expressed by all other Senators participating in hearings — including Com- 
merce Chmn. Magnuson (D-Wash.), who sat in on Pastore Subcommittee sessions. Accustomed to rough 
treatment on Capitol Hill, the industry's witnesses basked in this new glow of Congressional approval of the 
Great Debate series & other political programming. 

Further relaxation of Sec. 315 of Communications Act appeared certain as the result of reports on 
broadcasters' behavior under the temporary (one-campaign-only) lifting of equal-time restrictions. It's "com- 
mon understanding" that suspension for Presidential & Vice Presidential candidates will be made permanent, 
Pastore said. Regularizing the bill (S-204) by Magnuson wasn't on last week's agenda, however, and pro forma 
legislative hearings on the measure must be held before there's any action. 

Pastore hearings also raised hope for broadcasters that some major surgery on Sec. 315 — not just 
face-lifting — may be undertaken this session. In his debut on Capitol Hill as industry spokesman, NAB Pres. 
LeRoy Collins made a traditional plea for outright repeal of Sec. 315. He also came up with a fresh idea. He 
proposed that Congress knock out the rigid equal-time rules, but keep the principle by expanding the law's 
"fairness" standards for all public issues "to apply to appearances by candidates for office as well." 

NAB won no open endorsement from Subcommittee for this alternative suggestion, which wasn't 
seconded at the hearings by the networks. CBS Inc. Pres. Frank Stanton & NBC Pres. Robert E. Kintner made 
the usual pitch for complete repeal of Sec. 315. ABC's Washington vp Alfred R. Beckman & MBS vp Stephen 
J. McCormick asked merely for continued suspension for top candidates. 

Interest in Collins formula was displayed by Pastore & Magnuson in particular, however. They 
nodded agreement when Collins pointed out: "Such a standard would remove legislative strictures which 
impede the flow of political speech, and would substitute the broad base of over-all fairness in the handling of 
all issues of public import." And Sen. Thurmond (D-S.C.) commented: "The NAB is very fortunate in having 
Gov. Collins." Yarborough said he shared Thurmond's opinion. 

The only big question raised about outlook for extension of Sec. 315 suspension for Presidential 
tickets was whether President Kennedy would consent to appear on air with Republican opponent if he runs 
again in 1964. Kennedy himself settled that one at his televised Feb. 1 news conference (see p. 6). Asked 
about it in an 88-word question, he gave a 3-word answer: "I would, yes." 

Networks' testimony at Pastore hearings was largely repetious of that heard at the December hear- 
ings by Special House Campaign Expenditures Committee (Vol. 16:51 pi). Stanton, Kintner, Beckman and 
McCormick stressed the unprecedented role played by TV & radio in 1960 campaign, promised more of same 
if they're permitted non-equal-time political operations in future. They also filed detailed reports on campaign 
broadcasts and the costs borne by networks ($2 million, CBS; $1.7 million, NBC; $1.5 million, ABC). 



VOL 17: No. 6 



3 



Statistical summaries of industry's performance were submitted by FCC Chmn. Ford, who said TV & 
radio made "quite a great record" on all counts. Among FCC findings, based on answers to the Commission's 
political questionnaires: (1) TV stations averaged 2 hours 55 minutes of free time for all Democratic candi- 
dates, 2 hours 54 minutes for Republican candidates. (2) Democrats spent $6.75 million, Republicans $7.5 
million, others $400,000, for paid TV & radio time. (3) TV networks charged Democrats $1.1 million, Repub- 
licans $1.82 million for time — "practically at the same level as in 1956." (4) In all of 1960 up to Election Day, 
FCC received only 30 complaints citing "some phase of Sec. 315 in situations involving local, state and national 
offices" — and they were resolved quickly. 

FCC'S FORM 324 DENOUNCED: Broadcasters were in full cry last week against FCC's revised 

& expanded annual questionnaire Form 324, which asked stations to disclose hitherto uncalled-for details 
about their financial operations (Vol. 16:45 p3 et seq.). 

A 22-page document filed by NAB — which had asked for and obtained an extension from Dec. 9 to 
Feb. 1 in the Commission's deadline for comments — summed up protests which piled into FCC. Among 
other objectionable things, said NAB chief counsel Douglas A. Anello & attorney Robert V. Cahill, FCC is 
trying to dig up "most confidential" financial data which competitors could use in damaging ways. 

Citing material gathered by NAB's broadcast personnel & economics mgr. James H. Hulbert and his 
asst. David L. Doughty, the NAB lawyers said their protest against new Form 324 was made only "after due 
consideration, investigation and discussion with all segments of the broadcasting industry." They said some 
information demanded of stations by the Commission constitutes "the most confidential of all business figures, 
and revelations of these to competitors would result in great harm to individual licensees." 

Anello & Cahill professed inability to understand why the Commission needs to know about sources 
of a licensee's income which are unrelated to broadcasting: "As is well known by the Commission, broadcast 
licensees are involved in all sorts of other businesses which have no bearing on or relation to broadcasting. 
Broadcasters own real property, operate restaurants & newspapers, write books, serve as govt, officials, 
practice law or medicine, and engage in a variety of activities too lengthy to detail.” 

Moreover, NAB said: (1) "The form would impose a great administrative burden on broadcasters.” 
(2) "The form would force many stations to change their present accounting procedures." (3) "Many of the 
figures required would be subject to a wide variety of interpretations, some of which may be erroneous." 

A similar line against Form 324 was taken in comments submitted by dozens of objectors. The 
complaint from KARK-TV Little Rock was carried beyond FCC, too — a certified copy was served on President 
Kennedy's Budget Bureau. 

MURROW — VOICE OF 'THE VOICE': Will Edward R. Murrow become "the" voice of Amer- 

ica? He might. Frankly admitting he dislikes being an administrator ("in-baskets & out-baskets are not for 
me"), the prospective U.S. Information Agency director could well be expected to become a frequent & 
regular on-mike & on-camera figure — conceivably a spokesman of enormous importance. 

Almost universal satisfaction & surprise greeted announcement of the 52-year old CBS commentator's 
selection — satisfaction because of his internationally acclaimed achievements, surprise because of his willing- 
ness to accept burdens of administration (and cut his income from $200,000-$400,000 to $21,000). Selection of 
USIA director from the ranks of broadcast media is striking indication of new prestige of broadcasting. 

He must go before Senate Foreign Relations Committee for confirmation hearing — but date isn't set; 
his name isn't officially before Committee yet. 

"Truth" is Murrow's by-word, and he says his intention is to present a truthful picture of America to 
the world. In interviews last week, he said that "whatever is done will have to stand on a rugged basis of 
truth;" that U.S. needs a louder but "not strident" voice; that he hopes to marshal nation's most skilled com- 
municators; that he plans to move gradually at first; and that many of USIA's staff have great ability. 

Murrow's right arm will be deputy dir. Donald M. Wilson, 35, Life magazine's chief Washington cor- 
respondent for 4 years before leaving to campaign for President Kennedy. There was no confirmation of 
reports that other top CBS newsmen — Sig Mickelson & John Day, who resigned last week (see p. 10) — would 
follow Murrow to USIA. There's no question, however, that Murrow will be able to attract newsmen of ability. 



4 



FEBRUARY G, 1961 



Murrow made an emotion-charged "farewell speech " to CBS affiliates via closed circuit Jan. 31, 
stating that ''some part of my heart will stay with CBS." He was "grateful" to CBS management for releas- 
him to USIA, and modestly doubted that he'd put a crimp in news operations, "because for many years I 
have received credit for what other people have done." In introducing Murrow, Fred Friendly, exec, producer 
of "CBS Reports," shared no such reticence, saying: "We're going to be in for some tough sledding. We are 
losing the best pitcher, outfielder, infielder in the business." CBS Inc. Pres. Dr. Frank Stanton, in a telegram 
to Murrow, saluted his appointment as "good news indeed for the American people & the free world." 



Advertising 

LANDIS— ‘NO CZAR’: Coordinator, not dictator — that’s 

what James M. Landis intends to be. In 2 speeches last 
week, President Kennedy’s new special asst, on regula- 
tory agencies, sensitive to fears he intends to run the 
agencies from the White House, sought to calm worries. 

Landis told the Federal Bar Assn, that “nothing has 
been further from my thoughts” than the idea of becoming 
a “czar” and he told the AFA “I hate czars.” 

What he’s concerned about, he said, is the “tremendous 
amount of fragmentation of regulatory concern in areas in 
which some development of national policies was essential 
if we were to increase the pace of our national growth.” 
He deplored the increase in financial problems of railroads, 
airlines, truckers, etc., in the face of the large rise in our 
gross national product. Then: 

“In the field of communications the emergence of a 
host of new nations threatens the continued use of those 
frequencies that we have been accustomed to using, unless 
somehow we find new frequencies & new means of com- 
munication that hitherto have not been utilized. In TV, we 
still have to find an economic viability for the uhf band.” 

Improvements Now Developing 

He said he was happy to note improvements under way, 
though “whether they were stimulated by my suggestions 
or whether they derived from previous consideration of the 
problems is utterly unimportant.” Among these, he said: 
“The FCC has now determined to make some review 
of the practices of licensees seeking renewal of their 
licenses. If these licenses were originally granted to them 
upon their representation of their proposed program con- 
tent, their ability to live up to these promises bears some 
relationship to their privilege to keep a frequency that 
others are aspiring to. This is not a suggestion of censor- 
ship but simply a determination between competing 
licensees as to which one should in the public interest be 
granted a frequency that can only be utilized by one.” This 
was his first acknowledgment that FCC had done anything 
he approved of before he reported to President Kennedy. 

He summed up the job of coordination among agencies: 
“Apart from its intrinsic complexity, there are innumer- 
able bureaucratic pressures, inter-agency rivalries, and 
competing demands on the part of vested interests. But 
somehow or other we must succeed.” 

Other major areas he plans to work on; procedural 
delays, personnel. He didn’t state specific plans, but said 
he needs help: “No one man can do that task. But one man, 
perhaps, can get other men, not necessarily from govern- 
ment, primarily, I should say, from outside. Borrow them, 
don’t hire them ... to help out in a task as gigantic as 
that.” Landis said he has no plans for new agencies. 
Rather, wants instead the development of a “national policy 
among these fragmented fields.” 

Landis had soothing words for industry, assuring AFA 
that regulatory agencies might better be called “promo- 



tional agencies.” By trying to “curb monopoly, conspiracy 
and other unfair trade practices,” he said, they promote 
“the theory of capital enterprise.” 

The other govt, speaker, Commerce Undersecretary 
Edward G. Gudeman, former Sears, Roebuck vp, thought: 

(1) Advertising needs more research to find out what 
produces results — differing, for example, from Sears’ 
catalog program which can pinpoint ad impact. 

(2) U.S. needs to promote exports — and Commerce 
Dept, is eager to help industry. 

The conference luncheon attracted a powerhouse of 
govt, officials, including FCC Chmn. Ford & FTC Chmn. 
Kintner. A reception for Congress brought out, among 
others, Sen. Pastore (D-R.I.), chmn. of Commerce Com- 
munications Subcommittee, and Rep. Harris (D-Ark.), 
chmn. of Commerce Committee. 

Some 400 AFA members attended — and they believed 
their time was well spent. They were particularly cheered 
by a message from President Kennedy: “I hope that your 
Washington conference will accomplish its stated objective 
of establishing a closer relationship between government & 
your industry, and create a better understanding of adver- 
tising as a dynamic force in the national economy.” 



Advertisers can’t hypnotize the public, even with exten- 
sive TV campaigns, into decisions they don’t want to make, 
declared NBC’s Robert W. Sarnoff before the National 
Automobile Dealers Assn, annual convention in San Fran- 
cisco Jan. 31. Without mentioning names (i.e. Ford’s 
Edsel) he said “there is no more eloquent testimony than 
the recent history of the automobile industry to the fact 
that people have a stubborn way of making up their own 
minds.” Such critics as Vance Packard who regard the 
public as “a patsy for Madison Avenue manipulators” are 
“insolent charioteers who ride roughshod over such scorned 
manifestations of popular taste as tail fins or Westerns” 
he said. Broadcasters & advertisers have a responsibility 
“to lead & influence public taste,” he added, “but we can 
only propose; the public disposes, and rightly so.” The 
NBC chairman went on to praise admen for acting as the 
“flywheel that keeps the wheels of prosperity turning” 
within the U.S. economy. 

This is National Advertising Week, initiating the 
first around-the-calendar compaign to acquaint the public 
with advertising’s role in the national economy. The cam- 
paign is being guided by Advertising Federation of America 
and Advertising Assn, of the West, which have furnished 
gratis promotion material to all media. Available for TV 
stations: A variety of filmed spots (2 each 60- & 30-see.), 
2 sets of 20-sec. 4-slide spots with voice scripts. For radio 
use: scripts for “live” spots of varied lengths (10-to-60- 
sec.), a disc of recorded spots by entertainment figures. 

Advertising prohibition parade has started again in 
Congress. Rep. Siler (R-Ky.) led it with a bill (HR-2297) 
forbidding any interstate traffic in ads — including broadcast 
commercials — for alcoholic beverages. 



VOL. 17: No. 6 



It 



Schick Shaves Off TV: The “bulk” of Schick Inc.’s $3.5- 

million 1961 ad budget will be placed in newspaper & 
Sunday supplement media. The razor firm’s recent T\ 
schedule (part-sponsor of The Witness on CBS-TV and of 
specials on NBC-TV, plus spot-TV announcements) will 
be dropped. Schick advertising dir. William F. Siegel made 
the announcement last week. Even less welcome news to 
TV sales executives was Siegel’s explanation: “News- 
papers are the most effective medium on the 1961 horizon 
... A medium that will give us a positive return on every 
ad dollar invested.” Schick’s new newspaper schedule, an 
outgrowth of a successful pre-Christmas campaign in 
newspaper supplements, will be augmented by a schedule 
in Life, Time, The Netv Yorker and Playboy. 

Schick ad strategy has lately been causing a fair de- 
gree of agency headaches in N.Y. Within the past month, 
A.S.R. Products Corp. (Gem safety razors, blades) moved 
its account from Kenyon & Eckhardt to Benton & Bowles. 
This created a client conflict with B&B’s then-held Schick 
Inc. account, which moved to Norman, Craig & Kummel, 
now Schick’s agency of record. In turn, this triggered a 
conflict with NC&K’s portion of the Ronson account (or so 
Ronson felt), even though NC&K is responsible for Ronson 
lighters rather than shavers. At last report, NC&K was 
about to lose its Ronson business, which may equal or 
even exceed the Schick billings. Schick’s shift to print 
media, however, was not an NC&K decision; it was de- 
cided directly by the client, unlike last fall’s TV-to-print 
shift by Shell Oil via the Ogilvy, Benson & Mather agency. 

Shell Oil, meanwhile, was making news of its own. 
The oil firm’s all-print, no-TV campaign was coming in 
for some widespread dealer-consumer criticism, accord- 
ing to a survey reported in the Jan. 27 Printers’ Ink. Only 
a few dealers attribute any sales increases to the full-page 
Shell ads, the PI survey stated. Several Shell dealers (like 
Los Angeles dealer Chuck Abrams) complained “there is 
tod much reading material [in the ads]. People are too 
lazy — TV would be much better.” Many dealers who like 
the company’s copy platform in the new campaign feel 
however that it would be better to schedule it “in all 
media,” PI reported. 



Duke’s return to TV was announced last week by Lig- 
gett & Myers. TV-introduced at the end of 1959, the 
“super-hi-filtration” cigaret bowed off the air last year 
after an FTC order prohibited tar & nicotine health claims. 
Duke continued to sell without any advertising, and this 
has prompted L&M again to push the brand (via McCann- 
Erickson). Local TV (N.Y., Chicago & Los Angeles) and 
some print media will carry the original “Meet the Duke” 
slogan, but the new ads won’t mention the cigaret’s low 
tar & nicotine count. 

■ 

Ad People: David V. Cleary and Benjamin Maugham 

named Young & Rubicam vps . . . Miss Marion MacDonald 
and Wallace Gordon named Grant Advertising vps . . . 
Donald W. Redell, ex-TelePrompTer, named vp, Advertis- 
ing, Radio and Television Services, Inc. 

Obituary 

John Kelley Strubing Jr., 62, retired vice-chmn. of 
Compton Advertising, died Jan. 28 at his home in Lyme, 
Conn., after a long illness. Surviving are his wife, mother 
and a brother. 



“The new SAG-AFTRA code increases the cost of 
actors in commercials an estimated $15,000,000 over last 
year ... In 1960, one of New York’s top [commercial] 
producers grossed over $5,700,000 — yet lost $33,000!” — 
Harry W. McMahan in Advertising Age. 

Spot-TV costs — despite increased production charges — 
still compete with network & syndicated program rates, 
according to an Edward Petry Co. analysis of the new 
AFTRA-SAG contracts. “Although talent rates for spot- 
TV commercials rose much more than for network or syn- 
dicated-program usage, spot rates started from a much 
lower base and could accommodate the hike without sur- 
passing network or syndicated rates,” states the rep firm. 
The analysis points out that SAG spot rates, formally 30- 
40% below AFTRA, have merely been “brought into line.” 
The only situation in which the network rate now compares 
favorably with “wild-spot” breaks & participations occurs 
“when an advertiser buys less than 20 markets — an imprac- 
tical buy.” Because the cost of commercial production has 
always been a minor factor in over-all TV campaign costs 
(5-7%), the SAG talent-fee boost will add less than 1% 
to spot TV budgets. “Clearly the choice between network 
& spot will continue to be based on the intrinsic merits of 
each medium for the needs of the particular advertiser,” 
the rep firm report concluded. 

Evaluation of rating services, by psychology prof. 
Richard I. Evans in Jan. -Feb. NAEB Journal, concludes: 
“If marketing research organizations would expend as 
much effort in examining . . . qualitative aspects of the 
behavior of TV audiences as they do on the usual nose- 
counting techniques, they would, in my opinion, discover 
that buying behavior could sometimes be stimulated more 
successfully by recognizing unique needs of certain in- 
dividuals in the TV audience than by appealing at all 
times to a mythical common denominator. This is not to 
say that programming for a mass audience would have no 
place in the industry, but rather it suggests that such up- 
grading of programming in terms of the interests of dif- 
ferent audience groups could not only reduce the intensity 
of some of the basic criticisms of commercial program- 
ming, but also, in the long run, increase the effectiveness 
of programming as a means of influencing the viewer’s 
buying behavior.” 

Originality is inhibited in network TV by the sheer 
fact of its “high costs,” and makes for copy-cat stereotypes 
in both programming & commercials, stated George Skin- 
ner, radio dir. of rep firm Katz Agency at an RTES sem- 
inar luncheon in N.Y. last week. Radio, he pointed out, will 
offer in the 1960s a good place for admen to test “new pro- 
gramming & commercial ideas at the lowest possible cost.” 

Another TV commercials festival will be held May 4 
in N.Y. The entry deadline is March 1 for film or video- 
taped commercials shown in the U.S. & Canada between 
March 31, 1960 and March 1, 1961. Festival dir. Wallace 
A. Ross said announcement brochures were being mailed to 
5,000 advertisers, agencies, producers and TV stations, and 
“well over last year’s 1,327 entries” are expected. Judging 
will be by a “TV commercials council,” chaired by John P. 
Cunningham of Cunningham & Walsh. 

Co-op ad regulations proposed by Internal Revenue 
Service, in line with 1960 excise-tax law amendments per- 
mitting manufacturers to make deductions for local TV & 
radio commercials (Vol. 17:3 pl7), will be reviewed at a 
Feb. 17 hearing in Washington. In scheduling the session, 
IRS set a Feb. 14 deadline for applications to testify. 



6 



FEBRUARY 6, 1961 



Programming 

TOUCH-UP FOR ‘UNTOUCHABLES’: ABC-TV headed for 

cover last week in the face of rising gusts of Washing- 
ton protests against the network’s high-rated, rat-a- 
tat-tat cops-&-gangsters show The Untouchables. 

In an attempt to avoid threatened storms, ABC vps 
Thomas R. Moore & Alfred Schneider met in Washington 
Feb. 1 to negotiate “a better understanding” with 4 House 
members who had objected to portrayals of Italian-Ameri- 
cans in the prohibition-era semi-documentary. 

Two days later ABC issued a formal statement in 
N. Y. which: (1) Conceded that parts of episodes of The 
Untouchables are just fiction, not actual happenings in the 
tommy-gun career of prohibition agent Eliot Ness. (2) 
Gave assurances that “steps had been taken to avoid any 
undue emphasis or concentration on any one ethnic group.” 

Earlier, Rep. Santangelo (D-N.Y.), leader of the anti- 
17 ntouchables House caucus, had reported that the ABC 
spokesmen agreed to label the entire program “as fictional 
& designed for entertainment.” But the network disputed 
this interpretation — and Santangelo told us he may have 
misunderstood Moore & Schneider. 

Santangelo & 3 other Democrats — Reps. Anfuso 
(N.Y.), Rodino (N.J.) and Addabo (N.Y.) — told the ABC 
negotiators that the show was “seriously injuring the good 
character & reputation of the great majority of American 
citizens of Italian origin.” 

The 4 House members also said that The Untouchables 
“grossly distorts the history of the era and the character- 
izations referred to.” 

Picket Threat Still Stands 

A threat by the Italian-American Democratic Federa- 
tion (which Santangelo heads) to picket ABC’s N. Y. 
studios on March 9 — Amerigo Vespucci day — still stood. 
But Santangelo said a final decision on this tactic wouldn’t 
be made until a N. Y. meeting of the organization which 
is scheduled for Feb. 13 but may be postponed to Feb. 17. 

Partial text of ABC’s statement on the Washington 
peace parley follows: 

“ABC, in its meeting with Congressmen Santangelo, 
Anfuso, Rodino and Addabo in Washington on Wednesday, 
informed them it had instituted many months ago a policy 
of avoiding the use of Italian characterizations on The 
Untouchables except in cases where the story was based on 
a person who actually existed or where the part was entirely 
dependent for its theme on use of such characterizations. 

“This policy is in line with ABC’s intent never to pre- 
sent any program which might cast reflections upon or be 
detrimental to any segment of the public. 

“ABC also advised the Congressmen that ABC had 
decided to include the following announcement on all broad- 
casts of The Untouchables : ‘This series of programs is 
based upon the book, “The Untouchables,” by Eliot Ness & 
Oscar Fraley, although certain portions of this exposure 
were fictionalized.’ ” 

* * * 

Meanwhile, a new cloud of trouble for TV networks 
began gathering in the Senate. “Excessive portrayal of 
violence & crime” on TV and in the movies is a likely sub- 
ject for hearings by the Judiciary Subcommittee on Juvenile 
Delinquency, Chmn. Dodd (D-Conn.) said. 

Dodd won an increase to $178,000 from $150,000 in his 
1961 appropriation from the Senate and put his staff to 
work collating preliminary data on TV & movies, which 



he declared have caused increasing concern to the public. 

Subcommittee staffers told us they already had been 
exploring movie angles with Eric Johnston’s Motion Pic- 
ture Assn, of America, and that they have interviewed child 
psychiatrists & psychologists to get their views. TV net- 
works haven’t been approached yet— but they are on the 
staff’s pre-hearing agenda. 

* * ♦ 

President Kennedy’s views on TV violence and whether 
he can do anything about it remained uncertain following 
his answer to a question in his news conference last week. 
Correspondent May Craig spoke of the “growing concern 
expressed by parents, clergy & J. Edgar Hoover about the 
effect on young people of crime & violence in movies & on 
the air” and asked whether there is anything “you can do 
about it or may you ask for legislation?” Kennedy said: 
“When we get into movies, the amount of influence which 
the federal government can exert is quite limited, as you 
know, quite properly limited.” He want on to say that the 
govt, can help parents do the job primarily by efforts to 
improve children’s environment through urban renewal, 
better housing & schools, etc., but that “we can only play a 
very supplemental role and a marginal role.” The fact that 
Kennedy mentioned only movies in his response led to spec- 
ulation that he may believe that govt, can do something 
about excessive crime & violence on TV & radio. 



“It is now agreed that the four Great Debates on tele- 
vision were the cornerstone of John Kennedy’s victory. 
Without them, Nixon would probably have won the Presi- 
dency on the ‘experience’ issue. With the debates, Ken- 
nedy’s articulation, maturity and charismatic appeal re- 
ceived a national audience that tipped the scales in his 
favor.” — Schwerin Research Corp. [“Charism: A special 
divine or spiritual gift.” — Noah Webster.] 

“Spy Next Door” will be seen on CBS-TV after all, 
despite the network’s sudden cancellation of the Armstrong 
Circle Theater episode early last week. The 60-min. drama 
which deals with Russian espionage activities in the U.S., 
will appear in the Armstrong series on Wed. Feb. 15, 10- 
11 p.m. CBS reversed its earlier decision after screening 
the tape recording of the drama, made in N.Y. Feb. 1. 
The show was officially approved by a special committee 
composed of program vp Oscar Katz, program-practices vp 
Joseph H. Ream, affiliate-relations vp William B. Lodge, 
vp & gen. attorney Thomas K. Fisher, and information- 
services vp John P. Cowden. Earlier, CBS had announced 
that the decision to yank the show was entirely the net- 
work’s, and that “no cancellation request was received from 
anyone either in or out of the govt.” And Armstrong ad 
vp Max Banzhaf had stated that he believed the network 
had pulled “Spy Next Door” in light of recent improve- 
ments in U.S.-Russian relations. 

“Iceman” received a cautious OK from NAB’s TV Code 
Review Board at its meeting in Beverly Hills last week. 
After viewing NTA’s 4-hour Play of the Week presenta- 
tion of Eugene O’Neill’s “The Iceman Cometh,” Board found 
it “acceptable” under special circumstances. It spelled out 
its definition of “special circumstances” in these words: 
“Decision by the individual station should be predicated on 
knowledge of the station’s audience and the availability of 
broadcast time which will direct the presentation to those 
in the audience who will not be offended by such drama.” 
Thus, in effect, the whole matter was left up to the sta- 
tions. The taped “Iceman” was originally seen on WNTA- 
TV N.Y. last December and is now being syndicated. 



VOL. 17: No. 6 



7 



10 Biggest Warner Draws: The late Humphrey Bogart 
has been tops for the past 5 years as an audience draw in 
the pre-1950 Warner Bros, features distributed by United 
Artists Associated (and previously by Associated Artists 
Productions). He starred in 7 of the 10 films “most often 
requested, sold and booked during the initial 5 years of 
TV distribution” of the 754-feature library. 

As released last week by UAA exec, vp Erwin H. 
Ezzes, the top-10 list will interest TV program creators, 
film buyers and TV admen. For one thing, several films 
on the list had only “average” theatrical grosses. And the 
choices underline the public’s fondness for strong, slickly- 
produced, gutsy, action-adventure yarns in their TV fare. 

The top-10 pre-1950 WB features, in order: (1) 
“Chain Lightning,” (2) “Dark Victory,” (3) “Key Largo,” 
(4) “Casablanca,” (5) “Treasure of Sierra Madre,” (6) 
“High Sierra,” (7) “City for Conquest,” (8) “Story of 
Louis Pasteur,” (9) “Night & Day,” (10) “To Have & 
Have Not.” Bogart starred in the first 6, and the 10th. 

UAA’s “five-year sales evaluation, which took several 
months to prepare,” said Ezzes, “revealed those features 
which over the years proved to be most profitable for sta- 
tions and UAA alike.” 



TV’s down-but-never-out show, the 30-min. Silents 
Please packaged for ABC-TV as a sustaining summer re- 
placement in 1960, has signed a sponsor at last. The client 
is Dutch Masters cigars, which has been sponsoring Take 
a. Good Look, the Ernie Kovacs show for which Silents 
Please was originally created as a short-term replacement. 
Announcement of the Dutch Masters buy, planned for a 
fall start, came from Saul Turell, pres, of Sterling TV, 
who is conducting a slow-motion contractual romance with 
radio Moscow’s TV channel — also “interested” in the show. 
Among Turell’s planned “condensations” of silent movies 
for the fall cycle: Lon Chaney’s “The Phantom of the 
Opera,” Fairbanks’s “The Thief of Baghdad,” and D. W. 
Griffith’s “Intolerance” (as a 2-parter). 

NBC wiil “wire-syndicate” newsfilm, starting Feb. 6, 
to provide affiliates equipped with video-tape recorders a 
same-day source of national news material usable in local- 
station newscasts. Newsfilm material will be fed on closed- 
circuit in the afternoons, thereby replacing distribution by 
air-freight. Of the 202 NBC-TV affiliates, 75 (or about 
40%) have video-tape recorders. The service, under devel- 
opment for 2 years, will be operated by a staff headed by 
NBC national news mgr. Donald Meaney. Stations taping 
the newsfilm, NBC stated, will have as much as a 24-hour 
advantage over local competitors. 

Somebody goofed in N.Y. Feb. 2. Viewers tuned in for 
old-favorite Groucho Marx at 10 p.m., saw instead — an old 
documentary on New York City. Why had the network 
substituted the documentary? Had Groucho leered at one 
blonde too many? Explained red-faced NBC late last Fri- 
day: “It’s quite simple. All our films are sent over from 
the film center at 729 7th Ave. This one just never got 
here and we ran whatever was handy.” 

Ex-KTLA Los Angeles vp-gen.-mgr. James Schulke 
has been freed of an indictment charging him and ex- 
KTLA newsman Pat Michaels of “conspiracy to commit 
slander” (Vol. 17:2 plO). The indictment was dismissed 
for lack of evidence last week by Riverside, Cal., County 
Superior Court Judge John G. Gabbert. The indictment 
stemmed from a 1959 KTLA telecast in which Michaels 
charged anti-semitism in Elsinore, Cal. 



Roll of Honor citations by the Conference on Communi- 
cations and the Public Interest were conferred last week 
on commentator Edward R. Murrow, CBS Pres. Dr. Frank 
Stanton, Talent Associates vp David Susskind, NBC crea- 
tive projects director Irving Gitlin, and the Gulf Oil 
Corp. The citations honor contributions to the diffusion of 
knowledge and have “nothing to do with the merit of pro- 
grams as such,” according to Conference Chmn. Gilbert 
Seldes, dean, the Annenberg School of Communications, 
U. of Pa. The citations: Murrow, “for his assertion of 
the principle that no dept, of govt, ought to try to influence 
the handling of news events by the news media.” Stanton, 
“for his decisive action eliminating commercial messages 
from the Great Debates.” Gitlin, “for demonstrating the 
duty” of broadcasters to offer controversial programs. 
Susskind, “for his announcement that he would no longer 
submit the names of actors & actresses for clearance by the 
networks’ blacklisters.” Gulf Oil was cited for underwrit- 
ing news-connected programs on NBC and “leaving to the 
network control of choice of subject, time-period, content.” 

Technology 

Use of light beams for TV networking and other point- 
to-point radio communications, as a substitute for micro- 
wave, came closer last week with Bell Labs’ announcement 
that it had developed a continuously operating optical 
maser. Utilizing neon & helium, the device potentially 
could transmit 1,000 times more channels than a compar- 
able microwave system. The beam can be focused to spread 
no more than one foot in 100 miles, making the develop- 
ment promising for space communications. Although other 
optical masers have been announced previously, Bell sci- 
entists said the new breakthrough is development of a con- 
tinuous beam which can be modulated to carry TV, voice or 
other sophisticated signals, rather than merely pulses. 
Although Bell Labs declined to estimate when optical 
maser systems could come into practical use, there was 
speculation that the day is still about 10 years off. Prin- 
cipal credit for the development was given to Dr. A. L. 
Schawlow of Bell Labs, inventor of the maser, Dr. C. H. 
Townes of Columbia U. and Ali Javan, Bell Labs. 

Edison radio amateur award for 1960 has been won by 
John T. Chambers, Los Angeles (W6NLZ), and Ralph C. 
Thomas, Kahuku, Oahu, Hawaii (KH6UK), for joint ex- 
periments in high-frequency 2,540-mile communications 
between the 2 points. Picked from among 18 candidates 
by judges who included FCC Comr. Hyde, they will share 
the 9th annual GE-sponsored award at a Feb. 23 dinner in 
Washington. FCC Chmn. Ford will be the main speaker. 

Worldwide TV & communications via space satellites 
will be the first project of newly organized British Space 
Development Co. Ltd., founded last week in London with an 
initial capital of $56,000. The founding group is headed by 
Sir Robert Ren wick, industrialist & stockbroker, and World 
War II controller of communications for the Air Ministry. 

Transistorized video-tape recorder, designed for indus- 
trial & lab uses, will be shown by Sony Corp. at next 
month’s IRE convention in N.Y., according to reports from 
Tokyo. The prototype 400-lb. unit uses 100 transistors & 
100 diodes and is expected to be followed later by a version 
for TV broadcast uses. 

NASA plans to launch a 74-lb. satellite to explore the 
ionosphere. It will transmit on 20, 40, 41, 108, 360 & 960 
me, have an apogee varying from 240 to 1,600 miles. 



8 



FEBRUARY 6, 1961 



Film & Tape 

PRODUCERS & IATSE MAKE PEACE: Compromise, as pre- 

viously indicated here (Vol. 17:5 plO), paved the way 
for the signing of a new 4-year contract last week be- 
tween IATSE and Alliance of Television Film Pro- 
ducers and Assn, of Motion Picture Producers. The 
agreement was hammered out just before the old con- 
tract expired Jan. 31. We never heard the word “strike” 
mentioned by any responsible employer or union repre- 
sentative. 

IATSE, which had sought a 25% across-the-board 
wage increase, will receive a 10% hike in the first 2 years 
and an additional 5% in the second 2 years. Despite early 
cries for a cut of post-1948 movies sold to TV , there is no 
such provision in the contract. But provision is made for 
payment into the industry’s pension and health & welfare 
funds of 9% of the distributor’s gross from the sale of 
post-1960 movies to TV. 

Other provisions include (1) payment of 8 cents an 
hour into the industry health & welfare fund to provide 
coverage for dependents of employes; (2) increase of em- 
ployer payments into the industry pension plan from 8 
cents an hour to 12 cents an hour, with increase of employe 
payments from 5 cents to 7 cents an hour; (3) agreement 
to recommend to the labor-management board of trustees 
of the industry pension plan that monthly pension payments 
be increased from the present $95 to $120 a month; (4) 
provision for partial pension payments at retirement age 
for employes who at age of 35 have worked in the indus- 
try 10 qualified years, including 3 qualified years in the 
last 5 years of employment, with a specified minimum of 
total hours worked; (5) $500 insurance provision to cover 
retirees; (6) pay TV to be considered a part of movie ex- 
hibition; (7) improvement in vacation benefits whereby an 
employe will get 3 weeks vacation after 10 years employ- 
ment with a single studio, rather than after 12 years; (8) 
change in the “golden hours” provision so that workers in 
studios will get double time after 12 hours instead of 2% 
times base pay after 14 hours; (9) improved severance 
pay provisions. 

IATSE International Pres. Richard Walsh, basic- 
crafts negotiating committee Chmn. Ralph Clare, AMPP 
exec, vp Charles Boren, and Alliance Pres. Richard Jencks 
announced details of the agreement. Others who took part 
in the negotiations were John Zinn of the Alliance; An- 
thony Fredericks, Revue Studios; William Cowitt, Lou 
Rackmil, Ziv-UA; Rudy Peter sdorf, Desilu Pi-oductions ; 
Charles Bole, Four Star Television; Marvin Faris, Marterto 
Productions, Wyatt Earp, Brennan-Westgate, Mayberry. 

* * * 

It was an apparent “misunderstanding” last week that 
caused Writers Guild of America West to strike producer- 
director-star Ozzie Nelson and Stage 5 Productions, which 
films his series (Vol. 17:5 plO). As we reported, it was 
over in record time — 16 hours. A WGA spokesman 
earlier had said that Stage 5 Pres. Leo Pepin had 
signed a contract and assured the Guild that Nelson would 
also sign. (Nelson had the 3 ■writers of The Adventures 
of Ozzie & Harriet under personal contract.) When the 
signed agreement from Nelson wasn’t forthcoming, WGA 
called a strike Jan. 30. But when Nelson freed the writers 
from their contracts and they signed with Stage 5, peace 
was quickly reached. His signature isn’t necessary now that 
the writers are employed by Stage 5. 



MGM-TV Presents The Bride: MGM-TV has completed 
shooting what may well be the most elaborate & expensive 
pilot presentation of a half-hour show in TV film history 
— its Father of the Bride project. In order to showcase 
the pilot to best advantage, the Culver City lot utilized 
lavish techniques and will show potential sponsors a 50-55 
min. film presentation which will include the half-hour 
pilot. (Final length hasn’t been determined because the 
film is still being edited.) About $200,000 was spent on the 
presentation (a figure considerably more than for most 
60-min. shows) which required 8 days of filming & much 
pre-production preparation. 

The presentation opens with Leon Ames, who plays 
the role of Father, as on-camera narrator discussing 
the show. Vignettes from 12 episodes are shown, as well 
as all of “The Wedding,” a half-hour segment which will 
be the 11th in the series if the show is sold. The studio used 
150 extras in this episode. 

The purpose of the extensive presentation is to answer 
beforehand questions from potential sponsors as to how 
the remainder of the series would be handled. Many a 
sponsor has been scorched because subsequent segments of 
a series didn’t maintain the quality of the pilot. 

Ruby Abel produced the pilot for MGM-TV and Robert 
Maxwell was exec, producer. Ames, Ruth Warrick, Myrna 
Fahey and Burt Metcalfe star. 



Peak 20tH Production: 20th Century-Fox TV will be 

hitting a record production pace by next week, when 6 
pilots will be before the cameras, in addition to the studio’s 
regular series. Nine production units will be shooting film 
at once, we’re told by production chief Roy Huggins. 

The first pilot to go into production is The House on 
Rue Riviera, formerly called Monte Carlo. A 60-min. show 
for NBC-TV, it’s being produced by Huggins. Going into 
production Feb. 13 is The Hunters, 60-min pilot formerly 
called Tanganyika and Kilimanjaro. It’s for ABC-TV, and 
Robert Blees is producer. Another 60-min. pilot, Bus Stop, 
also for ABC-TV, goes into production the same date — 
as do 60-min. The Jayhawkers, with Blees producing; 
Margie, a comedy, with Hal Goodman & Larry Klein pro- 
ducing, and Ginger Rogers Show, produced by William Self. 



Hollywood’s trend to 60-min. shows (Vol. 17:3 p8) 
continued last week, as MGM-TV TV vp Robert Weitman 
decided to expand the studio’s Dr. Kildare pilot to the hour 
length. Weitman told us he thought this would make it a 
more salable product. Raymond Massey & Dick Cham- 
berlain star in the pilot, which goes into production about 
Feb. 7. Weitman also disclosed MGM-TV has leased the 
adjacent Hal Roach Studios for production of commercials 
as well as TV films. Although MGM has 30 stages, it’s 
crowded because of TV film & movie production, he ex- 
plained. 

WNEW-TV N.Y. represents the first U.S.-market. 
breakthrough for British Commonwealth International 
Newsfilm Agency, TV & movie newsfilm supplier. The N.Y. 
independent station began using the world-wide newsfilm 
service, Visnews, on Jan. 30 in nightly (11-11:10 p.m.) 
newscasts designed to augment the station’s existing tele- 
news shows. Visnews, which is backed by BBC, the Rank 
Organization, Australian Bcstg. Commission, CBC and 
Reuters, will also service WNEW-TV’s sister outlet, WTTG 
Washington. 



VOL. 17: No. 6 



9 



NEW YORK ROUNDUP 



UA has acquired motion-picture-distribution rights to 
the March 13 TelePrompTer-produced Patterson- Johansson 
bout (Vol. 17:1 pll). There will be no home telecasting of 
the fight, which will be closed-circuited by TelePrompTer 
and radio-covered by ABC. UA, which distributed films of 
the first 2 Patterson-Johansson fights, has offered Tele- 
PrompTer “a substantial guarantee.” Actual price of the 
deal was not disclosed. 

Videotape Productions, N.Y.-based commercial & pilot 
producer, has decided to hire “a key group” of production, 
sales & staff personnel stranded by the close-down of the 
CBS production sales unit (Vol. 17:4 pll). Videotape Pres. 
Howard S. Meighan said a 2nd step in this expansion pro- 
gram will be the acquisition cf “additional studios” (pos- 
sibly, the 3 N.Y. studios shuttered by CBS last month). 

Add syndication sales: 7 Arts has sold its 40-feature 
post-1950 Warner Bros, package in 39 markets to date. 
Newest sales include WBNS-TV Columbus, WGN-TV Chi- 
cago, KSYD-TV Wichita Falls. ITC has sold its off-net- 
work, 72-episode series Broken Arrow in 38 markets to 
date. New sales include KOOL-TV Phoenix, KTTV Los 
Angeles, WRC-TV Washington, D.C. 

Flamingo Films plans to offer five 30-min. series in 
syndication — The Wonderful World of Little Julius (Sam 
Levene), The Ring of Steel (Margaret O’Brien), Under- 
water Counterspy (Reed Hadley), The Priest & the Parolee 
(Lloyd Nolan), Invasion by 3 (Chuck Conners). 

ABC Films’ 1960 overseas sales jumped 61.8% over 
1959, according to Pres. Henry G. Plitt. And U.S. network 
sales scored by the AB-PT affiliate “more than offset” 
lagging domestic syndication sales, keeping the trend up- 
ward, he said. 

People: Herman Rush, former Flamingo Films pres., 
has been named GAC-TV vp. He will supervise the N.Y. 
div. and head development & sales of new TV properties 
. . . Walter Kingsley has resigned as ITC pres, “due to 
differences existing on future policy-planning” . . . James 
F. Delaney has been named ABC Films Southern div. mgr. 
. . . Joseph Kotler has been elected Ziv-UA N.Y. sales vp 
. . . Sid Kramer has resigned as NTA foreign sales vp to 
serve as independent consultant. 



Factbook No. 32 Closes March 3 

The 1961 Spring-Summer edition of Television 
Factbook (No. 32), our new and greatly expanded issue 
containing data never before published in one volume, 
closes for advertising on Friday, March 3rd. The new 
Factbook, for the first time, provides station area cover- 
age and circulation at a glance — contour maps of all 
commercial stations as filed with the FCC, county by 
county and net weekly circulation of all commercial sta- 
tions as reported by the American Research Bureau, 
plus all the regular features which, since 1947, have 
made Television Factbook the industry’s most fre- 
quently used reference. To reserve your advertising 
space for this new 1,088-page edition we suggest you get 
in touch with our Business Department today. Call, 
write or wire for rate card and descriptive brochure. 



HOLLYWOOD ROUNDUP 



Four Star Television Pres. Dick Powell said holdings 
he & June Allyson have in the telefilm company will not 
be affected as a result of the property settlement in their 
divorce granted last week. Powell & Miss Allyson will re- 
tain their Four Star interests in a 10-year trust agreement 
as a long-range investment. They and A. Morgan Maree 
will be voting trustees. The couple owns 204,000 of the 
600,000 shares of common stock outstanding. 

Selmur Productions, the AB-PT film-production sub- 
sidiary, is negotiating to sign Richard ( Have Gun — Will 
Travel) Boone to star in a series upon expiration next year 
of his CBS-TV contract. Selmur Pres. Selig Seligman, con- 
firming the negotiations, told us “We are trying to find a 
mutually satisfactory property.” 

Heritage Productions Pres. Paul Benton has resigned 
for “personal reasons,” and sold his stock in the new TV 
film company to Buddy Bregman, who becomes president. 
Benton told us he financed the firm’s first special, The 
Song & Dance Man, but has withdrawn from all future 
participation in Heritage. 

Fred A. Niles Productions, Chicago, has established an- 
other company of the same name in Hollywood (650 N. 
Bronson). The firm produces TV commercials; films, closed 
circuit & live shows for industry, and TV series. Lionel 
Grover is production mgr. of the new operation. 

William Dozier, Screen Gems West Coast vp; John 
Reynolds, western administrative vp for CBS-TV, and 
Christy Walsh, Hollywood vp of Oglivy, Benson & Mather, 
have been named to the Advertising Council’s Hollywood 
TV-radio committee. 

Lang Jeffries & Ben Cooper star in The Impatient 
Ones, QM Productions pilot for ABC-TV. Quinn Martin is 
producer . . . Essex Productions, owned by Frank Sinatra, 
will pilot International House. 

CBS Films is in production at Paramount on the pilot 
of Russell, starring Fess Parker. Gordon Kay is producer. 

Allied Artists’ informational films div. will produce 
the 90-min. special, “A Touch of Greatness,” this spring. 
It deals with the life of D. W. Griffith. 

Richard Carlson will star in Police Doctor, Cal. Na- 
tional Productions pilot being produced by Henry Kessler. 

People: Edwin E. Holly, Desilu Productions secy.- 

treas., named company administration-finance vp . . . 
Fenton Earnshaw and Charles Schnee have been nom- 
inated as candidates for the presidency of Writers Guild of 
America West. The annual election is in May . . . W. B. 
Henderson named exec, producer of Bill Burrud Produc- 
tions . . . Carl Reiner will produce All in a Day’s Work, 
comedy pilot starring Dick Van Dyke. . . Producer-director 
William Asher leaves NBC-TV, where he has been pro- 
ducer-director of the Shirley Temple series, to produce a 
Desilu Productions pilot starring Janis Paige and a spe- 
cial starring Lucille Ball . . . Andre Bohem is named pro- 
ducer of CBS-TV’s Rawhide, and Seeleg Lester leaves pro- 
ducership of CBS-TV’s Perry Mason to produce The Gun- 
slinger, on which Charles Marquis Warren is exec, pro- 
ducer. Art Seid and Arthur Marx have been named alter- 
nate producers of Perry Mason . . . Arthur M .Frankel, 
head of Screen Gems’ legal dept., elected asst. secy. 





10 



FEBRUARY 6. 1961 



Networks 

News Chiefs Quit CBS: The backstage stresses & strains 

which have plagued CBS News since last summer erupted 
violently last week. Within a matter of hours, the net- 
work’s No. 1 and No. 2 newsmen — CBS News Pres. Sig 
Mickelson and news vp John F. Day — announced they were 
quitting the network. Richard S. Salant, the network’s 
corporate affairs vp who was recently named to head the 
top-brass committee to which CBS News is now respon- 
sible (Vol. 16:51 p5), w T as named to replace Mickelson as 
pres, of the news div., effective Feb. 6. Blair Clark, a CBS 
News correspondent since 1953 (Paris, Geneva, etc.) was 
named to the newly-created post of vp & gen. mgr. of CBS 
News, also effective Feb. 6. 

In his new job, Salant will be the network’s top news 
executive. His background: Harvard Law School, U.S. 
Attorney General’s staff, Justice Dept., partner in N.Y. 
law firm. Much of Mickelson’s purely news-area functions 
will be transferred to Blair Clark, whose pre-CBS back- 
ground (Harvard Journalism, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 
Boston Herald & Traveller) , is more closely allied with 
journalism. Clark is pres, of TV-Radio News Analysts 
Assn., and was a Harvard classmate of President Kennedy. 

Word of Mickelson’s resignation reached CBS execu- 
tives Feb. 2 in a memo from CBS Inc. Pres. Dr. Frank 
Stanton, -who stated he was making the announcement 
“with deep regret.” Mickelson joined CBS in 1943 as 
news editor for radio o&o WCCO Minneapolis, and rose 
through the news ranks. He, Stanton noted, will “take a 
post outside CBS which will be announced shortly.” 

Day has been the operating head of the network’s 
news functions for the past 6 years. Originally, he ran 
the news show, reporting to CBS management. Then, Sig 
Mickelson, who had been in charge of public-affairs activ- 
ities (as opposed to straight news) was placed in charge 
of all news & informational programming. More recently, 
a re-alignment made Mickelson responsible in turn to a 
CBS News exec, committee headed by Salant. 

NBC’s recent rating victories in various news areas 
(conventions, election, Inauguration, etc.), the departures 
of Irving Gitlin (to NBC) and Edward R. Murrow (to 
USIA — see p. 3), a hassle last month between Howard K. 
Smith & CBS over the frequency & importance of Smith’s 
Washington reports in the Doug Edwards show — these all 
added to the problems of Mickelson and Day. 

Day’s comment, when we contacted him last week 
concerning his resignation (which went into effect as of 
Feb. 4), was brief & blunt: “I’ve had it here. I’ve been in 
the newspaper editorial field for 30 years. I like it. I’ve 
received 3 very lucrative offers in this area. I’ve also 
spoken with Ed Murrow who wants me to work at USIA.” 

CBS’s complete official reaction: “CBS News has ac- 
cepted the resignation of John F. Day and is delighted he 
has received outside offers.” 

Where would Day, onetime managing editor of the 
Louisville Courier-Journal, go? He didn’t say, and nobody 
knew for sure. Some observers guessed that he might join 
forces with his good friend Ed Murrow at USIA. Others 
guessed that he might make a shift to join news vp James 
C. Hagerty’s new team at ABC-TV. 

* * * 

TV’s impact on politics has been “the only genuinely 
new force,” Mickelson is scheduled to state this week (Feb. 
6) in an address, “The Role of Mass Communications in a 
Democratic Society,” at the U. of Texas. 



Network Television Billings 

November 1960 and January-November 1960 

For Oct. report, see Television Digest, Vol. 17:3 p8 



Nov. Billings Up 9.7%: Network TV’s Nov.-1960 gross 

time billings increased from October’s $63.3 million to $64 
million — 9.7% ahead of Nov.-1959’s $58. 3-million. TvB’s 
latest compilation also shows year-to-date billings of $621.7 
million — 9.3% ahead of the $568. 6-million business written 
during 1959’s first 11 months. 

NBC, for the 2nd consecutive month in 1960, led the 
networks in monthly dollar volume, posting a 12.9% in- 
crease to $24.6 million from Nov.-1959’s $21.8 million. CBS 
continued to lead in cumulative billings with a 3.5% gain 
to $251 million vs. runner-up NBC’s $227 million. ABC, 
as is customary, chalked up the big percentage gains: 
20.9% in Nov. 1960 over Nov. 1959, 28% for Jan.-Nov. 
1960 over the same 1959 period. 

The 11-month nighttime billings of the 3 networks in- 
creased 12.2% to $430.8 million from $383.9 million in 
Jan.-Nov. 1959. Daytime billings gained 3.3% to $190.9 
million from $185 million. In Nov. 1960 vs. Nov. 1959, 
nighttime billings were up 4.9% to $42.3 million from $40.4 
million. Daytime spurted 20.5% to $21.7 million from $18 
million. 

NETWORK TELEVISION 

Nov. Nov. % Jan.-Nov. Jan.-Nov. % 

1960 1959 Change 1960 1959 Change 

ABC $15,841,960 $13,103,250 +20.9 $143,802,940 $112,384,714 +28.0 

CBS 23,563,839 23,458,970 + .4 250,934,013 242,420,221 + 3.5 

NBC 24,575,958 21,765,361 +12.9 226,949,294 213,837,126 + 6.1 

Total $63,981,757 $58,327,581 + 9.7 $621,686,247 $568,642,061 + 9.3 

1960 NETWORK TELEVISION TOTALS BY MONTHS 



ABC CBS NBC TOTAL 

January $13,260,010 $23,477,358 $20,980,897 $57,718,265 

February 12,677,110 22,977,171 19,923,712 55,577,993 

March 13,487,460 24,043,799 21,072,164 58,603.423 

April 12,701,240 22,580,032 20,642,038 55,923,310 

Mav 12,876,050 23,209,917 19,414,264 55,500,231 

June 11,948,700 22,062,832 18,959,323 52,970,855 

July 12,529,660 23,442,997 19,805,457 55,778,114 

August 11,366,100 21,448,482 18,052,503 50,867,085 

September 11,875,080 21,103,437 18,436,653 51,415,170 

October 15,239,570 23,024,149 25,086,325 63,350,044 

November 15,841.960 23,563,839 24,575,958 63,981,757 



Note: Figures revised as of Jan. 31, 1961. These figures do not 
represent actual revenues inasmuch as the networks do not divulge their 
actual net dollar incomes. The figures are compiled by Broadcast 
Advertisers Reports (BAR) and Leading National Advertisers (LNA) 
for TV Bureau of Advertising (TvB) on the basis of one-time rates or 
before frequency or cash discounts. 



New-to-TV sponsors, ranging from such well-known 
holdouts as U.S. Borax to fast-developing products like 
Metrecal, reached a total of almost 50 on the networks in 
1960. NBC was the top new-advertiser attracter, with 
modestly-priced Jack Paar & Dave Garroway participa- 
tions serving as bait. ABC ran a close 2nd, thanks to 
American Bandstand, sports and daytimers. CBS, pri- 
marily via Captain Kangaroo, attracted 13 TV novices. 

ABC-TV plans a new situation-comedy animated 
series, Calvin & the Colonel, for next fall, with the “stars” 
to be the voices of Amos V Andy creators Freeman Gosden 
& Charles Correll. 

CBS-TV has signed a new 5-year deal with Paisano 
Productions, producer of Perry Mason, and owner of sev- ■ 

eral other Erie Stanley Gardner properties. Gail Patrick 
Jackson, Paisano exec, producer, has begun preparing the 
Mason series for the 1961-62 season. 




VOL. 17: No. 6 



11 



NETWORK SALES ACTIVITY 



ABC-TV 

Daytime programming, Mon.-Fri., participations eff. Feb. 
Mystik Tape (George H. Hartman) 

Roaring 20’s, Sat. 7:30-8:30 p.m., participations eff. Feb. 
American Chicle (Ted Bates) 

CBS-TV 

Gunslinger, Thu. 9-10 p.m., part. eff. Feb. 9. 

Whitehall Phamnaceutical (Ted Bates) 

Daytime programming, Mon.-Fri., part. eff. Feb. & March. 

S. C. Johnson (Foote, Cone & Belding) 

NBC-TV 

The Outlaws, Thu. 7:30-8:30 p.m., part. eff. March 30. 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco (Ted Bates) 

One Happy Family, Fri. 8-8:30 p.m., part. eff. Feb. 10. 
Block Drug (Grey) 

Michael Shayne, Fri. 10-11 p.m., part. eff. Feb. 24. 

P. Lorillard (Lennen & Newell) 

NBA Basketball, April 1 & 8, participations. 

Seiberling Rubber (Meldrum & Fewsmith) 

Daytime programming, Mon.-Fri., part. eff. April 3. 

Bon Ami (Hoyt Associates) 



Technical-union contracts at all 3 networks are being 
worked out peacefully, and there’s not much chance of a 
technicians’ strike. This was the impression we gathered 
late last week in conversations with ABC, NBC and CBS. 
The first 2 networks, negotiating with National Assn, of 
Best. Engineers & Technicians, have been meeting in Cin- 
cinnati — “neutral” ground. CBS has been negotiating with 
the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers in 
Washington. Actually, contracts at all 3 networks have 
expired and technicians are working without contract (but 
without any specific strike decision) and non-union help 
was on a stand-by basis last Friday. Officially, the net- 
works and the unions aren’t talking about the labor situa- 
tion. Unofficially, we learned that NABET has drafted an 
ABC-NBC agreement contingent upon ratification by mem- 
bers which contains a wage increase of 5(4% in a 3-year 
deal, an improved health-insurance plan and strengthened 
severance plans. With ABC, NABET has reportedly worked 
out a union-sought pension plan which is likely to be a 
model for union agreements with the other networks. 
CBS’s IBEW contract ran out Jan. 31, but it was extended 
indefinitely in an agreement that the network or union 
must give a week’s termination notice. Washington nego- 
tiations were in recess last week until Feb. 6, following a 
Jan. 27 session at which no settlement on contract terms 
was reported reached. A union source told us that “no 
drastic action” was imminent. 



ABC edged out CBS last week for a sizable (about $5 
million annually) slice of Procter & Gamble billings. It 
happened like this: CBS discovered that P&G’s contract 
with ABC-TV for The Rifleman series hadn’t been renewed 
for fall, sent CBS-TV Pres. James T. Aubrey to P&G hq 
in Cincinnati to make a strong pitch for the business. 
Moving quickly, ABC-TV Pres. Ollie Treyz made a counter- 
offer to P&G. In it, ABC volunteered to move The Rifleman 
from its present Tue. 8-8:30 p.m. berth (between Bugs 
Bunny & Wyatt Earp) to a new spot on Mon. nights, 8:30- 
9 p.m., with a better rating potential. To do this, ABC will 
have to push Surf side 6 and Adventures in Paradise, both 
60-min. shows, a full half-hour into later periods. P&G 
decided ABC’s deal was best. The move thus will displace 
Peter Gunn, currently in the 10:30-11 p.m. slot on Mondays. 
But ABC is confident it will find another spot for ousted 
private-eye Gunn, and has nailed down one of the few 
full-program-sponsorship deals left in TV for fall. 

Next 2 White House news conferences will get tape 
instead of live TV & radio coverage, President Kennedy’s 
press secy. Pierre Salinger announced last week. “We just 
want to see how this will work,” Salinger explained. He 
said the first 2 Kennedy conferences carried live on TV — 
on Jan. 25 (Vol. 17:5 p2) and Feb. 1— had been “very suc- 
cessful” and that “we are going to have live press confer- 
ences in the future.” The networks will be able to report 
the tape sessions “at the same time as the newspaper re- 
porters enter the phone booths,” he pointed out. In initiat- 
ing live TV & radio conference coverage, the White House 
had made no blanket promise for instantaneous broadcasts 
of all sessions. Nor was there unanimous agreement by the 
networks to give live coverage to all conferences. Salinger 
denied that: (1) Newspapers had put on pressure to halt 
live broadcasts. (2) TV networks had objected to costs of 
carrying them. (3) The White House decision was based 
primarily on expectations that Kennedy would get a bigger 
audience with tapes run in prime night hours vs. 6 & 4 p.m. 
timing of the first 2 sessions. 



Auxiliary Services 

Medical TV center at the Army’s Walter Reed Hospital 
in Washington stopped operating Jan. 30 — on schedule— 
despite last-minute appeals to the White House to save it 
from dissolution (Vol. 17:5 p9). Dr. Paul W. Schafer, 
civilian dir. of the million-dollar pioneering installation, 
told us members of his staff would try “very definitely to 
stay together.” He said he still had hopes that the Kennedy 
administration would countermand Eisenhower administra- 
tion budget-economy orders closing his shop. But Dr. 
Schafer had received no assurances from the White House 
of any action at last week’s end. 

Seagoing TV system designed by RCA is now operat- 
ing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Franklin D. Roosevelt. 
The close-circuit hookup, purchased through the ship’s rec- 
reation & welfare fund, includes 25 viewing locations, film 
& live origination equipment. It will replace several im- 
promptu “theaters” for the showing of movies, and will 
also be used for live shows featuring Navy talent. In port, 
the system will pick up & distribute local TV programs. 

Translator starts: K70CF, K74BF & K78AT Canadian 
& Higgins, Tex. began operation over the weekend of Jan. 
21, repeating KGNC-TV, KVII & KFDA-TV Amarillo • 
K77AX Mason, Tex. began Jan. 1 with WOAI-TV San 
Antonio • K72BC Walker, Minn, started Dec. 24 with 
KDAL-TV Duluth, picking it up via K78AK Cass Lake, 
Minn. • W70AE & W80AD Moorefield, W.Va. started Nov. 
19 with WTOP-TV Washington & WJAC-TV Johnstown. 

Closed loop antenna transmissions used at internation- 
al conferences in the U.S. to carry translations of speeches 
aren’t subject to communications excise taxes. The 1954 
Internal Revenue Code (amended in 1958) applied the taxes 
to “talking circuit special service,” but IRS ruled translator 
systems aren’t primarily communications systems. 

NCTA plans to move late this month to the Transpor- 
tation Bldg., 17th & H Sts. NW, Washington. 




12 



FEBRUARY 6, 1961 



Stations 

NEW & UPCOMING STATIONS: KFOY-TV (Ch. 9) Hot 

Springs, Ark. began programming Feb. 1, without hav- 
ing settled definitely on a network affiliation. It’s this 
year’s fourth new starter and raises the operating total 
to 582 (91 uhf) . 

Also, we’ve been informed by R. L. Sharp, sales mgr. 
of CHBC-TV Kelowna, B.C. that an automatic repeater 
satellite in Lumby B.C. (Ch. 5) began operation last Nov. 
21. The licensee, Lumby & District T.V. Syndicate, paid 
CHBC-TV to build & place into operation this repeater 
which has a 5-watt Benco transmitter and a 50-foot tower. 
It’s sold as a bonus to CHBS-TV which has a $195 hourly 
rate. This report changes Canadian operating total to 81. 

KFOV-TV has a 500-watt Gates transmitter and a 
310-ft. Truscon tow'er with a 6-bay RCA antenna at 362% 
Central Ave. It will be part of Donald W. Reynolds’ Don- 
rey Media Group which includes KLRJ-TV Las Vegas, 
KOLO-TV Reno, KFSA-TV Fort Smith, Ark., 5 radio 
stations and a newspaper chain. Harold E. King, ex-radio 
KOKL Okmulgee, Okla. is gen. mgr.; C. J. Dickson, com- 
mercial mgr.; Arie Landrum, program dir.; Bryan Bisney, 
production mgr. ; Lillian Robbins, promotion mgr. Base 
hour is $150. Sales rep is not yet selected, although Bolling 
handles other Reynolds TV stations. 

* * * 

In our continuing survey of upcoming stations, here 
are the latest reports received from principals: 

KSLN-TV (Ch. 34) Salina, Kan. started construction 
Jan. 9 and hopes to begin programming in March according 
to Melville L. Gleason, pres, of the grantee, Prairie States 
Bcstg., which also owns radio KAWL York, Neb. A 5-kw 
GE transmitter is scheduled to be ready for use Feb. 1, 
but work hasn’t begun as yet on the 221-ft. tower. Network 
affiliation, base hourly rate and sales rep not yet set. 

KCSD-TV (Ch. 19, educational) Kansas City, Mo. has 
changed its programming target to March 1, says J. Glenn 
Travis, admin, asst, to the school supt. of the Kansas City 
School Dist. A 1-kw GE transmitter was ready for use 
early in January, and antenna was installed on a stub tower 
atop City Hall last fall. However, studios in the Board of 
Education Bldg, won’t be ready until Feb. 15. 

XEFA-TV (Ch. 2) Nogales, Mexico-Nogales, Ariz. has 
set April 1 as target for programming in both Spanish & 
English, reports Reed N. Haythorne. He states that the 
station expects to cover Tucson wdth a Grade A signal. 
Foundation is in and walls are going up, for a studio- 
transmitter building on Cabellero Mt. The station will use 
a 1-kw Electron transmitter and 230-ft. guyed Liberty 
tower. Transmitter installation is scheduled for completion 
March 10, and 4-bay directional Electron antenna is sched- 
uled for arrival March 1. Base hour will be $150. Rep will 
be Sonora Television Sales Co. 



Grant of Ch. 8, Christiansted, St. Croix, Virgin Islands, 
will be authorized soon by FCC which instructed its staff to 
draft a final decision following the voluntary dropout of 
Radio American West Indies Inc. 

Transfer of KNDO-TV (Ch. 23) Yakima, Wash, to Col- 
umbia Empire Bcstg. Corp. for $194,229 has been approved 
by FCC. Columbia is controlled by Hugh E. Davis, who 
bought ZZ.&l'A for $37,500 to bring his holdings to 51.10'/i ■ 
KTVT Ft. Worth may also identify itself with Dallas 
under an FCC waiver, Comr. Bartley dissenting. 



Westinghouse will silence radio WBZA Springfield, 
Mass., it told FCC last week, if the Commission requires 
Westinghouse to dispose of an outlet to keep within the 7- 
station limit (in connection with its purchase of KLAC 
Los Angeles for $4 million — Vol. 16:50 pl2). WBZA is 
operated synchronously on 1030 kc with parent WBZ Bos- 
ton. Radio WHYN Springfield had urged FCC to deny 
WBZA’s renewal, refuse to approve the KLAC purchase 
or make Westinghouse dispose of another station. Despite 
the unusual nature of WBZA’s operation, WHYN said 
that it’s a separate station and should be counted against 
Westinghouse’s total. WBC agreed — or decided it wasn’t 
worth fighting about. 

WSAZ-TV (Ch. 3) & WSAZ Huntington, W.Va. have 
been bought for $6 million by WJR, the Goodwill Station 
Inc., Detroit. William D. Birke, pres, of sellers Hunting- 
ton Herald-Dispatch and Advertiser, said that the sale was 
made so that his firm could concentrate on the newspaper 
field. WJR officials said they’re interested in acquiring 
“other compatible broadcast properties.” Negotiations 
were handled by brokers H. E. Stark & Vincent J. Manno. 

KMBC-TV (Ch. 9) & KMBC Kansas City sale applica- 
tion (Vol. 16:52 p4) has been filed with FCC. Metropolitan 
is buying the stations, plus KMOS-TV (Ch. 5) Sedalia, Mo. 
& radio KFRM Concordia, Kan., for $10,250,000. It is sell- 
ing KMOS-TV to the owners of KRCG Jefferson City, Mo. 
for $200,000, and KFRM for $201,000 to a group headed 
by lumber dealer Norman Kightlinger, Hutchinson, Kan. 

NAB Codes contain answers to complaints about broad- 
cast programs & commercials, NAB Pres. LeRoy Collins 
said in a filmed interview for KOTV Tulsa. He told the 
station’s news dir. Roger Sharp, who talked with Collins 
in Washington, that: “Much of what people find objection- 
able now in programming can be improved by the operation 
of our Code procedure & by the future development of our 
Code practices.” Collins said “there is a need for improve- 
ment” in commercials and that that is another job in the 
“over-all work of our Code committees.” In the interview 
he also repeated arguments for revisions in the Communi- 
cations Act’s equal-time Sec. 315. 

NAB’s 43-member board meets this week (Feb. 6-10) 
in the El Mirador Hotel, Palm Springs, Cal., for its reg- 
ular winter sessions. This will be the first board meeting 
for Pres. LeRoy Collins since he was elected at a special 
session last October. The schedule: Feb. 6, committee 
meetings on general finance and TV & radio finance. Feb. 
7, committees on NAB’s 39th convention in Washington 
May 7-10, membership and distinguished service award. 
Feb. 8, Radio Board. Feb. 9, TV Board. Feb. 10, joint board. 

Storer Bcstg. Co. rep firm formed to handle national 
spot sales for the group’s 5 TV stations (Vol. 16:50 pl2) 
has been incorporated as Storer TV Sales, Inc. It will op- 
erate as a wholly-owned subsidiary (not as a div.), from 
temporary offices at 625 Madison Ave., N.Y. 

Sale of KIVA (Ch. 11) Yuma, Ariz. to CATV operator 
Bruce Merrill (Antennavision Inc.) has been FCC-ap- 
proved. Consideration is $500,000 cash or $550,000 in install- 
ments. 

CP for KHQL-TV (Ch. 3) Sterling, Colo, is being as- 
signed to Richard B. Steuer (radio KTUR Turlock, Cal.) 
following FCC’s approval of the $2,185 sale. 

Sale of radio KHOW Denver to TCA Bcstg. Corp., 
which controls radio WKDA Nashville & KNOX Ft. Worth, 
has been approved by FCC. Price: $575,000. 



VOL. 17: No. 6 



13 



The FCC 

WTSP-TV Inc. was favored for Tampa-St. Petersburg 
area’s (Largo) Ch. 10 — over 5 competitors — in an initial 
decision issued last week by FCC examiner Millard F. 
French. The other applicants were: Florida Gulfcoast 
Bcstrs., WSUN-TY (Ch. 38), Suncoast Cities Bcstg., Tam- 
pa Telecasters, and Bay Area Telecasting. French’s con- 
clusions: “WTSP-TV’s proposal has been preferred over 
all other applicants in the factors of integration, program 
planning, programming proposal and past broadcast 
record. The preference given its programming proposal is 
substantial, while its program planning is entitled to a 
significant preference. This applicant has had an equal 
first preference with other applicants in the factors of 
broadcast experience & diversity of business interests. In 
the factor of diversification of the media of mass com- 
munication, this applicant has been rated 5th only above 
Gulfcoast, by reason of the radio interests of its principals. 
However, this factor loses a good part of its significance 
because some of the principals of all the applicants have 
radio, TV, newspaper or other mass-media interests in the 
area or elsewhere.” The proposed winner is controlled by 
the Rahall brothers, originally from Beckley, W.Va., who 
own radios WLCY (formerly WTSP) St. Petersburg; 
WQTY Arlington, Fla.; WWNR Beckley, W. Va.; WRAP 
Allentown, Pa. and WNAR Norristown, Pa. 

New “payoff” rules in the 1960 Harris-Pastore Act 
were invoked for the first time by FCC’s chief hearing 
examiner James D. Cunningham. He did so in refusing to 
approve a $10,000 payment to a withdrawing applicant for 
a Laurel, Md. AM station. He recommended dismissal — 
“with prejudice” — of the application of Laurel Bcstg. Co. 
(WTTG Washington personality Milt Grant & his partner 
James R. Bonfils). Cunningham then turned down an 
agreement in which Interurban Bcstg. Co., the remaining 
applicant, undertook to pay $10,000 “expenses” to Grant 
and $10 to Bonfils. Cunningham conceded that Laurel's 
expenses in pursuing the application exceeded the $10,000, 
but held that Laurel failed to show in required detail that 
“the amounts expended were both legitimate & prudent.” 
Grant explained he withdrew from the Laurel venture 
because his employer Metropolitan Bcstg. Co. adopted a 
rule against employes owning or operating stations. 

Broadcasters are now liable to forfeitures up to $1,000 
a day for various violations, FCC having amended its rules 
to conform with changes in the Communications Act passed 
last year. The Commission summarized the new rules as 
follows: “The rules, effective Feb. 13, provide that the 
Commission give written notice of apparent liability & the 
forfeiture involved. The recipient has 30 days to make 
payment or contend that the forfeiture is excessive, or that 
he is not liable. If he fails to respond, an order for forfeit- 
ure will be issued, to which the licensee or permittee can, 
within 30 days, apply for remission or mitigation. If the 
licensee or permittee fails to take any action, the case may 
be referred to the Attorney General for civil action.” 

FCC-recommended bills (S-683 & 684), requiring paint- 
ing of unused transmission towers (Vol. 17:5 p4) and cut- 
ting down on affidavit paper-work requirements for Com- 
mission documents, have been re-introduced by Senate 
Commerce Committee Chmn. Magnuson (D-Wash.). 

First fix on the hijacked Portuguese liner Santa Maria 
was obtained by FCC direction-finding engineers who for- 
warded findings to the Navy. 



Congress 

Televised hearings on Capitol Hill are “wonderful” 
for Senators conducting them, but they don’t “deliver the 
goods” in investigative results, according to Senate minor- 
ity leader Dirksen (R-Ill.). In a floor speech protesting in- 
creased appropriations for committees, he said: “It is won- 
derful to sit under the klieg lights, have the TV camera 
shine down, and then have the film appear all over the 
land.” But Dirksen added that he didn’t think TV makes 
“a good inquiry technique,” and that too often “spectac- 
ular” proceedings are an end in themselves. He noted an 
exception, however — the Senate racket hearings. 

Another CBS-TV show has been cited by Sen. Prox- 
mire (D-Wis.), erstwhile critic of the networks (Vol. 17:3 
pl5), as an example of “timely, informative and fair TV.” 
He said CBS-TV’s report on “The Keeper of the Rules: 
Congressman Smith & the New Frontier” gave viewers a 
much-needed understanding of “complex & controversial 
issues” involved in the House fight over its Rules Commit- 
tee (see p. 14). Proxmire said they “may have found this 
description of legislative maneuvering as fascinating as a 
good Western.” 

“Staggering” TV-radio costs of political campaigns, as 
totted up in Senate Commerce Communications Subcom- 
mittee hearings (see p. 2), have been cited by Rep. Mona- 
gan (D-Conn.) as proof that his bill (HR-2501) for 
govt, subsidies (Vol. 17:3 pl6) should be enacted. Pointing 
to FCC Chmn. Ford’s testimony that more than $14 million 
was spent for 1960-campaign air time, Monagan told the 
House that “this startling & frequently useless expendi- 
ture, which is unequalled anywhere in the world, should 
give us pause.” 

“Backdoor influence in some of the regulatory bodies” 
is being probed by the Senate Judiciary Administrative 
Practice & Procedure Subcommittee, Chmn. Carroll (D- 
Colo.) told the Senate in a speech to justify continuation 
of the unit for another year. He was voted $115,000 — 
duplicating his 1960 appropriation— to carry on. Carroll 
said he may have to ask for more money later to keep the 
Subcommittee’s staff together. White House may try to 
take away his “trained men” for other work, he explained. 

Anti-crime bill (S-710) sponsored by Sen. Keating (R- 
N.Y.) sets up $10,000 fines and/or 5-year jail terms for any- 
body convicted of conspiring to use broadcasting facilities 
to “commit any organized crime offense.” The measure 
would apply to “wire or radio communications” involving 
“gambling, narcotics, extortion, intoxicating liquor, prosti- 
tution, fraud, or false pretenses, or murder, maiming,” etc. 

President Kennedy has received a presentation copy of 
a volume of his campaign statements from Sen. Yar- 
borough (D-Tex.) in a White House ceremony Feb. 3. The 
book was one of a half-dozen volumes prepared as equal- 
time case documentation for Yarborough’s Commerce Free- 
dom of Communications Subcommittee (Vol. 17:5 p8). 

Congressional attack on CBS-TV’s “Harvest of Shame” 
documentary on migratory farm labor (Vol. 17:4 p7) has 
been renewed by Rep. Michel (R-N.Y.). He told the House 
that the show contained “obvious misrepresentations & in- 
excusable omissions,” that it represented “a strange type of 
reporting — the cub type.” 

Amateur radio week would be observed nationally dur- 
ing the 3rd week of June under a resolution (H. J. Res. 
188) sponsored by Rep. Ryan (D-N,Y.). 



14 



FEBRUARY 6, 1961 



Television. Digest 

PUBLISHED BY TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. 

WALTER H. ANNENBERG, President 

PUBLICATION OFFICE Radnor, Pa., MUrray 8-3940, TWX: Radnor 1028 

JAMES T. QUIRK, MERRILL PANITT, Editorial Director 

Business Manager HAROLD B. CLEMENKO, Managing Editor 
DAVID LACHENBRUCH, Asst. Mng. Editor 
JAMES B. DELEHANTY, HAROLD RUSTEN, Associate Editor 

Asst. Business Mgr. PAUL STONE 



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Copyright 1961, by Triangle Publications, Inc. 



Personals: Kenneth L. Bagwell, ex-WTVJ Miami, named 

station mgr., WAGA-TV Atlanta. He replaces Terry H. 
Lee, who will supervise Storer TV stations WITI-TV Mil- 
waukee, WSPD-TV Toledo and WAGA-TV. 

Edwin S. Friendly Jr. elected NBC-TV program admin- 
istration vp; Lester Gottlieb, recently named special pro- 
grams dir., elected vp . . . Robert Rheineck promoted from 
chief engineer, CBS New r s, to technical operations mgr.; 
Egon Pohoryles promoted from asst. mgr. of film produc- 
tion to mgr., motion picture photography . . . Joseph J. 
Jacobs resigns as Metropolitan Bcstg. Corp. gen. attorney 
to resume private practice, specializing in bcstg., enter- 
tainment & federal regulatory matters. 

James H. Burgess promoted from sales mgr., WLWA 
Atlanta to gen. mgr., succeeding Harry LeBrun, resigned. 
Burgess also replaces LeBrun as vp, Crosley Bcstg. of 
Atlanta . . . Jim Dooley named sports dir., WTVJ . . . 
Jules Bergman named to new ABC post of science editor. 

George Finnegan named gen. sales mgr., Clyde Dutton 
local sales mgr., WTVH Peoria, 111. . . . Don V. Lindsey 
promoted from regional sales mgr. to commercial mgr., 
WTVP Decatur, 111. . . . Adrian S. Fisher, vp & counsel of 
Washington Post Co. WTOP-TV & WTOP Washington and 
WJXT Jacksonville), appointed deputy to White House 
disarmament advisor John J. McCloy. 

Kenneth Adam named TV dir., BBC-TV, replacing Sir 
Gerald Beadle, who retires in June. Stuart Hood succeeds 
Adam as programs controller . . . James Pearson Anderson, 
ex-London Daily Mail, named asst, chief of Westinghouse’s 
European News Bureau, headquartering in London. 

Joseph Friedman named mgr., H-R Reps San Fran- 
cisco office . . . Herman Lowe, former Variety Washington 
correspondent, recently dir. of public relations & develop- 
ment at Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, 
returns to Washington to establish a public relations firm; 
Mrs. Lowe, also ex-Variety, is now Washington repre- 
sentative of Metropolitan Bcstg. Co. 



A. Prose Walker, NAB engineering mgr., resigns as of 
May 16 after the annual convention, to take an unspecified 
industry position. Accepting the resignation, NAB Pres. 
LeRoy Collins said that Walker’s departure “will be keenly 
felt by the Association and by the membership which he 
has served so devotedly.” 



Frank B. Ellis, new OCDM dir., turns out to have a 
direct interest in the TV industry. A New Orleans attorney, 
he owns 6%% of WVUE (Ch. 13), has been active in its 
affairs. Our report on his appointment <Vol. 17:5 pl3) had 
a typographical error which garbled the following rather 
pertinent sentence: “Announcing his choice of Ellis as the 
successor to OCDM dir. Leo A. Hoegh, President Kennedy 
said ‘a thorough-going review of our non-military defense 
& mobilization programs’ would be the agency’s ‘first order 
of business.’ ” 

NASA administrator succeeding T. Keith Glennan will 
be James E. Webb, 54, pres, of Educational Services Inc. 
and a dir. of Kerr-McGee Oil Industries Inc. and McDon- 
nell Aircraft Corp. Webb was Undersecretary of State & 
Budget Bureau dir. in the Truman administration. During 
the Eisenhower administration he served on military-aid 
& stockpile advisory committees. Hugh A. Dryden, deputy 
space chief under Glennan, will keep his post. 

New officers of Broadcasters Club, Washington: chmn., 
Robert Richards, public-relations consultant; pres. Ben 
Strouse, WWDC Washington; first vp, Joseph Goodfellow, 
WRC-TV Washington; 2nd vp, Arthur Scharfeld, attorney; 
secy., Vincent Wasilewski, NAB; treas., Richard Stakes, 
WMAL-TV Washington. 

Meetings next week: Assn, of National Advertisers 
cooperative advertising workshop (Feb. 14-15). Hotel Am- 
bassador, Chicago • IRE 1961 international solid-state cir- 
cuits conference (15-17), U. of Pa., Philadelphia. 

Law firm of Lyon, Wilner & Bergson has moved to 1343 
H St., N.W., Washington 5 (MEtropolitan 8-6900). 



Educational Television 

Federal-aid-to-ETV prospects brightened Jan. 31 when 
the House voted 217-to-212 to liberalize the conservative- 
controlled Rules Committee by expanding its membership 
from 12 to 15. The action assured Kennedy Administration 
supporters of a majority of at least 8-7 on the Rules Com- 
mittee. Last year that Committee prevented ETV legisla- 
tion from reaching a House vote — although it has been 
passed by the Senate and endorsed by the House Commerce 
Committee (Vol. 16:20 p5). With White House backing 
this year — and with no Rules Committee roadblock — similar 
proposals probably will be pushed through to final enact- 
ment. New Democratic members named to the Committee 
are Rep. Elliott (Ala.), a political moderate who is an ex- 
pert on education legislation, and Rep. Sisk (Cal.), long a 
member of the liberal bloc in the House. Both are counted 
on by ETV advocates to vote to clear any aid bill for floor 
action. Republicans delayed naming the 3rd new member. 
House hearings on the legislation haven’t been set yet, but 
Chmn. Magnuson (D-Wash.) of the Senate Commerce Com- 
mittee will start another round on his $l-million-per-state 
bill (S-205) at hearings March 1-2. 

Stratovised ETV will be delayed “a few weeks” be- 
cause of technical difficulties. Dr. John Ivey, pres, of the 
Midwest Council on Airborne TV, said that start of the ex- 
periment, due at the end of January, had been held up by 
problems met by Westinghouse engineers (Vol. 16:52 p4). 

Tropical African radio systems will get increased 
UNESCO aid under terms of an education program adopted 
at the UN agency’s 11th general conference in Paris. A 
need for more educational broadcasting in the area was 
stressed at the sessions. 



VOL. 17: No. 6 



IS 



V 




MANUFACTURING, DISTRIBUTION, FINANCE 



IMPORTS — NO LET-UP, NO 'SOLUTION': Exports of Japanese electronic products & com- 

ponents to U.S. increased about 40% in 1960 over 1959, and leaders of the U.S. electronics industry 
unanimously predict another rise this year. Those who say imports are hurting their business see no strong 
possibility of relief in near future. Single ray of hope is perceived in increasing public awareness of buy- 
American campaigns — such as the ones being conducted by some IBEW locals (Vol. 17:5 p 15). 

Official 1960 Japanese export figures aren't available yet, but data for first 9 months — released last 
week by Commerce Dept, and printed on p. 17 — tell enough of the story. For full-year 1960, it's estimated that 
nearly 7 million radio receivers of all types came from Japan to U.S. (vs. 6 million in 1959), that tape recorder 
exports to U.S. tripled (41,000 to 120,000). Component shipments rose comparably — speakers more than 
doubled to 1.5 million, capacitors rose to 15 million (from 9 million), tubes to 13 million (from 8 million). Only 
shipments of transistors declined — to about 1.6 million from 2.4 million. 

Within radio category, the 3-or-more-transistor type remained stable at about 4 million units, due to 
Japan's export quota system. Tube-radio shipments, however, hit at least 800,000 (from 457,000), while ''toy'' 
radios (1 & 2 transistors) climbed to about 2.4 million from 1.6 million. TV sets began arriving in quantity. 

Electronics manufacturers are still divided into 2 camps on import guestion — the lick-'ems & the join- 
'ems. Most of the join-'ems, however, even though importing Japanese parts or sets, say they're all for any 
measures which would stem the tide of imports and insist they themselves must import to remain competitive. 
In radio industry, prominent among the lick-'ems, of course, are Zenith, Admiral, Philco. The join-'ems include 
such names as Motorola (parts), GE (parts), Magnavox (radios), Olympic (radios). 

There's more disposition now within electronics industry to call for direct federal legislation to stem 
tide of imports than there was a year ago — but there's also the realization that Kennedy administration, 
committed to freer trade & reciprocal trade agreements, will be mighty hard to convince. In this connection, 
and in connection with EIA's official stem-the-imports-tide policy, some unusual alliances appear to come up 
— although they're not as incongruous as they may seem at first glance. Examples: Edward R. Taylor, chair- 
man of EIA's consumer-products executive committee, which is continually grappling with problem of 
imports, is exec, vp of Motorola's consumer products div., which uses Japanese parts in its radios. EIA Pres. 
L. Berkley Davis is member of Board of Trustees of Trade Relations Council, which favors legislation to protect 
domestic industry from mushrooming imports; he's also vp-gen. mgr. of components div. of GE — which uses 
Japanese parts in its domestic radios. 

Question of imports again will get top priority at EIA's spring conference next month. Still pending is 
EIA-requested OCDM investigation of whether Japanese exports are hurting defense-readiness of U.S. tran- 
sistor plants. It's understood that investigation results are due to be sent to White House soon, and decision 
could come in about a month — but may take considerably longer. 

In consumer electronics, imports from Japan are diversifying. The 6-transistor pocket radio is still the 
bread-&-butter item, but bottom may be dropping out of this market due to dumping & price-cutting. Improve- 
ment of products & prices of comparable radios by U.S. manufacturers — together with first noticeable results 
of buy-American campaign — is said by some to have made Japanese sets harder to sell. Other U.S. manufac- 
turers say that service problems and difficulty in obtaining parts for off-brand imports is cutting into market 
for Japanese shirt-pocket sets. Some of this may be wishful thinking. 

Summing up our conversations on imports with many segments of industry (digested on p. 15): 
Importers of Japanese equipment say sales are good and going up, but see far heavier competition (and less 
profit) in pocket radios. U.S. manufacturers who use Japanese parts do so either because some small com- 
ponents are not available here or because combination of high quality & low cost can help keep their products 



1G 



FEBRUARY 6, 1961 



competitive with imported end-equipment. Manufacturers who import & sell complete Japanese radios say 
their own brand names, quality control & warranty policies have protected them from any consumer hesitancy 
to buy imported goods, and some insist they'll drop imports as soon as some kind of "protection" from import 
competition is available. 

Those who spurn imported parts & end-products think combination of moral suasion and quality of 
domestic goods will win out in end — although they see tough road again. Many manufacturers hailed IBEW's 
proposed boycott of imported parts as heavy propaganda weapon, and more of them are stressing made-in- 
America theme. Example: Prominently featured in ads for Zenith's new transistor-radio line is the phrase 
"American made — no Japanese parts." 

Summary of opinions in set & parts industries on p. 15. 



TV-RADIO PRODUCTION: EIA_ statistics for week ended Jan. 27 (4th week of 1961): 

Jan. 21-27 Preceding wk. 1960wk. '61 cumulative '60 cumulative 



TV 108,626 100,152 141,111 360,520 526,494 

Total radio 320,837 257,037 383,424 1,054,964 1,355,788 

auto radio 112,124 82,389 175,535 388,478 632,461 



Giannini Buys Conrac: Conrac Inc., Glendora, Cal. manu- 

facturer of broadcast studio & closed-circuit TV monitoring- 
equipment and maker of Fleetwood TV sets for custom in- 
stallations, will be sold to Giannini Controls Corp., Duarte, 
Cal. The sale, subject to approval of Conrac stockholders, 
involves the transfer of Conrac’s business & assets for an 
undisclosed amount of Giannini stock. Conrac will be op- 
erated under its present management as an independent 
division of Giannini, whose principal product lines are pre- 
cision instruments & control sub-systems for aircraft, mis- 
siles & space vehicles. Giannini’s plants are located in 
Southern Cal. & N.J. Other merger news last week: 

International Resistance has entered the semiconduc- 
tor field via the cash purchase of 51% of the common stock 
of North American Electronics, Lynn, Mass, maker of more 
than 600 types of silicon rectifiers & Zener diodes, as well 
as silicon-controlled rectifiers with unique characteristics. 
NAE will continue independent operation, with its present 
officers. IRC will hold 6 of NAE’s 11 board seats, up from 7. 

Siegler Corp. and Jack & Heintz obtained stockholder 
approval of their merger Jan. 27 (Vol. 16:40 pl7). J&H, 
Cleveland manufacturer of aircraft & missile components 
and electric control systems, will operate as a wholly- 
owned subsidiary of Siegler (Olympic Radio & TV, Halla- 
more Electronics, David Bogen Co., Presto Recording, other 
divisions & affiliates). J&H stockholders have the option 
of exchanging one share of J&H common for 55/100 shares 
of Siegler common, or accepting a share of Siegler $5.75 
preferred for each 7 shares of J&H common. 

Raytheon is acquiring Trans-Sil Corp., Englewood, 
N.J. manufacturer of high-power silicon rectifiers. 

General Railway Signal, Rochester, N.Y. maker of 
electronic & electric control systems, has acquired control- 
ling interest in Cardion Electronics, Westbury, N.Y. manu- 
facturer of electronic control & communications equipment. 

Ling-Temco Electronics’ efforts to secure additional 
stock in Chance Vought (Vol. 17:4 pl9) ran into a legal 
roadblock last week. Chance Vought filed suit in Federal 
District Court in Dallas to block Ling-Temco from buying 
more of its stock and voting what it does hold, and to force 
the company to sell its holdings. Hearing has been set for 
March 13 to consider the request for a temporary injunction. 
Ling-Temco is believed to hold 10% or about 19,700 of 
1,190,000 Chance Vought shares outstanding. 



Factory sales of transistors in November declined in 
unit & dollar volume from the preceding month but con- 
tinued to run substantially ahead of the year-earlier pace. 
Unit sales for the 3rd consecutive month topped the 12- 
million mark. Cumulative sales for Jan.-Nov. totaled 114.6- 
million units, compared with 82.3 million for all of 1959. 
The 11-month dollar volume climbed to $273.5 million vs. 
1959’s $222 million. Here are EIA’s figures: 

I960 1959 





Units 


Dollars 


Units 


Dollars 


January 


9,606,630 


$24,714,580 


6,195,317 


$18,243,224 


February 


9,527,662 


24,831,570 


5,393,377 


14,560,056 


March 


12,021,506 


28,700,129 


6,310,286 


18,117,660 


April 


9,891,236 


23,198,576 


6,906,736 


16,864,049 


May 


9,046,237 


24,714,580 


6,358,097 


19,007,298 


June 


10,392,412 


27,341,733 


6,934,213 


18,081,693 


July 


7,070,884 


18,083,802 


6,030,266 


16,618,316 


August 


9,732,993 


22,739,969 


7,129,696 


18,964,188 


September ... 


12,973,792 


28,442,229 


8,662,526 


20,861,290 


October 


12.168,632 


25,945,195 


8,710.913 


22.109,748 


November .... 


12,149,077 


25,372,480 


7,846,600 


22,742,625 


TOTAL .... 


114,581,061 


$273,516,636 


74,467,926 


$199,189,791 



General Dynamics/Electronics was announced last 
week as a new GD division, absorbing the Stromberg- 
Carlson div. and the electronics activities of other di- 
visions. Stromberg-Carlson Pres.-gen. mgr. James D. Mc- 
Lean is president of the new division, and S-C vp George 
J. Dickey becomes vp-gen. mgr. Consumer & telephone 
products will continue to use the S-C brand name. GD/E 
will have 4 operating divisions — commercial products & 
telecommunications (both located in the S-C facilities in 
Rochester, N.Y.), military products (in Rochester and in 
Convair Electronics’ San Diego facilities) & information 
technology (S-C San Diego facilities). 

Crosby -Teletronics Corp. announced last week that it 
has signed an exclusive licensing agreement to make & dis- 
tribute Integrand speaker systems. The “revolutionary” 
systems employ transistorized servo systems. Pres. Mur- 
ray Crosby explained: “A small search winding is used on 
the voice coil of each speaker, moving with the cone. It 
reports back to the transistorized amplifiers that are an 
integral part of the speaker system, and the information it 
reports is compared with the electrical signal coming in. 
If there are any differences, or distortions, the amplifiers 
take immediate corrective action.” Crosby-Integrand sys- 
tems will range from $350 to $850. 



VOL. 17: No. ti 



17 



Japanese Exports of Electron 

Source: U.S. Commerce Dept. 


ic Products to U.S. 

360 yen = $1 










Quantity in thousands of 


units 


Value in thousands of dollars 


Product 






Jan.- 


Sept. 






Jan. 


-Sept. 




1958 


1959 


1959 


1960 


1958 


1959 


1959 


1960 


TV receivers 


1 


* 


* 


3 


3 


* 


* 


132 


Radio receivers, total 


2,507 


6,052 


3,900 


5,247 


17,904 


62,373 


37,445 


47,987 


tube type 


t 


457 


303 


536 


t 


2,552 


1,547 


3,896 


3 or more transistors 


jl 

t 


3,990 


2,449 


2,944 


t 


57,272 


34,721 


39,001 


other 


t 


1,605 


1,148 


1,767 


f 


2,549 


1,177 


5,090 


Radio-phonographs 


2 


21 


12 


21 


59 


547 


322 


648 


Sound recorders & reproducers 


8 


41 


18 


93 


449 


1,617 


711 


3,311 


Amplifiers 


JL 

i 


34 


22 


66 


t 


460 


253 


466 


Microphones 


80 


161 


113 


170 


177 


321 


220 


293 


Speakers 


129 


455 


285 


1,156 


420 


1,155 


805 


1,442 


Condensers 


6,166 


8,925 


5,709 


11,509 


288 


533 


345 


695 


Earphones 


JL 

l 


2,741 


1,902 


1,917 


J. 

1 


619 


432 


396 


Electron tubes, total '. 


1,238 


7,911 


4,856 


10,665 


314 


2,088 


1,241 


2,934 


receiving tubes 


t 


7,704 


4,667 


10,651 


t 


2,034 


1,194 


2,918 


other 


t 


207 


189 


14 


t 


54 


47 


16 


Transistors 


11 


2,393 


1,828 


1,235 


7 


1,581 


1,145 


821 


Other semiconductor devices 


t 


597 


529 


123 


t 


92 


81 


22 


Phonograph parts & accessories 




— 


— 


— 


757 


824 


534 


688 


Other electronic products 


. 








1.397 


3,43.2 


2,632 


3,217 


TOTAL 


— 




— 


— 


21,775 


75,642 


46,166 


63,052 


* Less than 500. t Not shown separately. 



















More about 

VIEWS ON IMPORTS: How much of a threat are Japanese 
imports (see p. 15) — and what should be done about 
them? The answer still depends on where you sit. 
Here are some assorted views on different aspects of 
the situation by various segments of the industry: 

Delmonico International — Exec, vp Herbert Rabat of 
this large electronics importer, the first to bring in Japa- 
nese TV sets in quantity, says business is excellent. Last 
November, he adds, saw a 21% increase in business over 
Nov. 1959. December was up 50%, January 36% ahead of 
a year ago. Asked about standard 6-transistor pocket sets, 
he said: “Sales are still there, but the profit is out of the 
market. The competition is too heavy, both from domestic 
sets & other imports. We’ve switched our emphasis.” Tube 
radios, both AM & AM-FM, phonographs & stereo consoles 
are featured in Delmonico’s line. 

GE — A spokesman said GE is still using imported 
parts not available in the U.S. (including tuners) in its 
transistor radios. No imported transistors are used. GE 
hasn’t increased its consumption of Japanese parts in the 
past year, and hopes to switch to domestic items when 
they’re available. 

Motorola — Consumer-products div. exec, vp Edward R. 
Taylor recently said Motorola buys approximately 3% of 
all components from foreign sources, principally Japan & 
Germany. Consumer-products mktg. vp S. R. (Ted) Herkes 
told us the company has a policy of “buying components 
any place in the world where we can get good ones at the 
best price.” He chided IBEW for “blaming all layoffs on 
imports,” stating that economic conditions are undoubtedly 
much more responsible. “More transistor portables were 
built in the U.S. in 1960 than in any other year,” he pointed 



out. “It’s TV that’s down — and TV imports don’t amount 
to anything.” 

Olympic — Pres. Morris Sobin said Japanese transistor 
radios are just as salable now as in the past. He said the 
Olympic trade name, warranty & quality control were 
important in reassuring customers of the quality of the 
imported sets his company merchandises. “Our engineers 
closely inspected Japanese facilities before we decided on 
any products,” he said. He added that “the import base is 
broadening; the 6-transistor pocket set is still the biggest 
item, but now there’s a much wider variety of Japanese 
products — stereo components, for example, and TV has its 
foot in the door.” 

Will Olympic import TV sets ? He said he didn’t know 
yet. “We’re in close touch with all products. We may 
import TV if the situation remains the same.” As to the 
whole question of imports, he said Olympic is importing to 
remain competitive in certain lines. “Since it is going on, 
we’re doing what many others are doing.” 

Sylvania — Sylvania Home Electronics Pres. Peter 
Grant was optimistic over the future of all-American 
radios. Said he: “I believe we can beat them with greater 
efficiency, streamlining of market functions. Sylvania is 
sticking with U.S.-made radios.” Pres. Don G. Mitchell of 
parent GT&E meanwhile told AIEE’s winter meeting in 
N.Y. that the challenge of overseas competition can be met 
by increased emphasis on research & development, greater 
automation & mechanization of manufacturing & adminis- 
trative processes, and more effective marketing. 

Zenith — “There are only 2 possible solutions to the 
problem of imports — and neither of them is likely to hap- 
pen,” said Zenith Sales Corp. Pres. Leonard Truesdell: 
“Higher U.S. import duties or a meaningful export quota 
imposed by the Japanese.” However, he saw some falling 



18 



FEBRUARY 6, 1961 



off of Japanese pocket radio business due to American-made 
competition. He pointed to the success of Zenith’s tran- 
sistor-radio line as proof that American firms can meet 
the challenge. He also cited servicing problems met by 
some imports. 

Sprague Electric — Chmn. Robert C. Sprague, who is 
also chmn. of EIA import committee, feels “the tide of 
imports is increasing.” Because of their high labor content, 
he said, semiconductors “represent the most dangerous of 
imports.” He also observed that, “generally speaking, the 
quality of Japanese components is as good as and in some 
cases better than the products of some of our competitors.” 
However, he said, Sprague’s business hasn’t been notice- 
ably affected by imports because of its diversified nature. 
“The companies that really suffer are the one-product 
outfits.” As to EIA action, he said his import committee 
will continue to press for protective legislation, such as a 
law requiring stricter labeling of products with imported 
components. He added that he sees no indication of increas- 
ing industry support of such action. 

The Muter Co. — Pres. Leslie F. Muter agreed that 
Japanese imports are on the rise. “They’re not doing much 
to us on large speakers, but they’re raising the devil with 
that small stuff that can be flown in to meet production 
schedules. On that basis they can give one-'week delivery.” 
He saw the greatest hazard in the field of small light- 
weight components with high labor content, such as capac- 
itors & resistors. As to a solution, Muter proposes: “We 
should balance the labor content in any foreign product to 
American labor rates with an import tax. This would make 
for fair competition — and if we can’t beat the pants off 
them in fair competition, we deserve to get licked.” 

‘Situation Is Sufficiently Serious’ 

Although Muter’s 1960 sales & profits were down from 
’59, he said he didn’t know how much of the dip was due 
to import competition. “I do know that the situation is suf- 
ficiently serious now so that we must have action. It’s true 
that the balance of trade is in our favor — but the stuff we’re 
exporting is basic material; we’re importing Japanese goods 
with high labor content.” 

Centralab — Pres. W. S. Parsons says most of the 
impact of imports so far has been in the consumer-products 
field. Pointing out that 60% of the radios sold in 1959 were 
imports, he said: “If they had been made here, each one 
would have represented about 10<? worth of components to 
us — that’s a total of more than a half-million dollars. He 
added that imports of transistors, because of their high 
labor content, probably represent the greatest threat. 
“These imports affect our own ability to cut costs through 
increased production.” He was optimistic that educational 
campaigns, such as IBEW’s action, will help bring home 
to the administration the need for action. 

Howard W. Sams & Co. — We asked operations vp Bill 
Hendler of this large publisher of servicing aids about the 
service problems of Japanese sets. He said that the big 
problem comes with lesser-known sets or sets of dubious 
parentage. The technician has 2 tough problems with these 
sets: First, he must identify the set so he can obtain serv- 
icing materials, such as schematics, etc. If he can do this 
successfully, locating the trouble usually isn’t a big prob- 
lem — but replacement parts are. Some simply are not 
available, or are available only from the importer — or some- 
times the importer must send to Japan for them. “The 
majority of Japanese transistors, too, are different from 
those made here.” 

“An alarming percentage of transistor radios will 



never be repaired,” said Hendler, because of difficulty in 
obtaining parts or high service cost due to lack of adequate 
identification of some sets. He said a higher percentage of 
replacement parts is available for U.S.-made transistor 
radios, but a wait is sometimes involved even for them. 



Sylvania may re-enter color TV this year, according to 
Sylvania Home Electronics Pres. Peter Grant. The decision 
to go into the color business hasn’t yet been made, he told 
us, “but the indications suggest that we probably will.” He 
said Sylvania distributor sales mgrs., working on retail 
floors last Christmas season, noted a “very real” consumer 
interest in color TV. Meanwhile Feb. 1 Wall Street Jour- 
nal noted a “cheery contrast” between sales of color sets 
and the “otherwise bleak” TV picture. It quoted “RCA of- 
ficials” as forecasting color sales of more than 200,000 
units this year. “Though no official industry-wide figures 
on color TV output are published,” said the Journal, Wil- 
liam Boss, RCA’s color-TV coordinator, estimates sales 
last year at more than 150,000 sets, 30% above the 115,009 
units produced in 1959.” He said January sales were 50% 
higher than Jan. 1960. Note: Television Digest, in its 
1961 forecast last month, estimated 1960 color sales at 
150,000, predicted about 225,000 for 1961 (Vol. 17:1 pl6). 

U.S.-made “convertible” radio was announced last 
week as one of 4 new transistor sets by Zenith. Deter- 
mined to beat the Japanese at their own game, Zenith has 
attached a $44.95 list price to its Converta Royal 55 shirt- 
pocket radio with its own auxiliary speaker cabinet which 
makes it a cordless table radio. Other new Zenith transis- 
tor sets are a new pocket radio at $34.95 and 2 portables 
with top carrying handles, at $44.95 & $59.95, designed 
to play in autos, planes, trains and other difficult locations. 
Advertising for the sets prominently features the mes- 
sage: “American made — no Japanese parts!” 

Automation has eliminated 50,000 jobs in TV-radio 
manufacturing in the last 10 years. So said Rep. Elmer J. 
Holland (D-Pa.), a member of the House Education & Labor 
Committee, in a report to President Kennedy. He predicted 
that 4 million office & clerical jobs will be eliminated in the 
next 5 years, urged a Committee investigation of the sit- 
uation. His report, based on union figures, said electronic 
machines had eliminated 25% of the country’s office & cler- 
ical jobs in the last 5 years, that 33,000 telephone & 80,000 
electrical machinery jobs have been displaced since 1953. 

Senate probe of reports that U.S. industry has been 
pricing itself out of world markets will be conducted by 
the Judiciary Anti-Trust & Monopoly Subcommittee headed 
by Sen. Kefauver (D-Tenn.). The Senate authorized the 
investigation — along with other Subcommittee projects — 
in approving a $450,000 appropriation for Kefauver for ’61. 

Ampex Audio (consumer products) & Ampex Profes- 
sional Products Co. (broadcast & institutional products, 
including audio & Videotape recorders) are being merged, 
reportedly as an economy measure because of a $2-million 
loss by parent Ampex Corp. for the fiscal quarter ended 
Jan. 31. Both are wholly owned Ampex Corp. subsidiaries. 

Closed-circuit TV for the home will be marketed 
experimentally by Ling-Temco Electronics. Carrying a 
$700 list price, the camera & monitor will be merchandised 
through large appliance stores & builders. 

Sign of the times: Lafayette Radio is closing out dis- 
continued RCA all-channel uhf converters at $4.95 (WR- 
21A) & $7.95 ( WR-22A). 



VOL. 17: No. 6 



19 



Trade Personals: W. G. E. Vreeland promoted from inter- 

national mktg. operations dir., RCA International, to div. 
vp of international mktg. operations; J. R. Reist named div. 
vp of associated companies operations. 

Marc A. deFerranti, ex-GE, named pres., ITT Europe 
& European gen. mgr. of ITT, headquartei'ing in Brussels; 
John Lienhard appointed vp & export dept. gen. mgr., ITT’s 
International Standard Electric Corp. . . . Amory Houghton 
resumes his post as Corning Glass chmn. after serving as 
Ambassador to France since 1957. 

Robert S. Bell, pres, of Packard-Bell, named also chmn., 
succeeding his uncle Herbert A. Bell, who will remain as a 
dir. & senior consultant . . . Harry B. Miller, ex-Clevite, 
named mgr., General Dynamics /Electronics’ (formerly 
Stromberg-Carlson) new electroacoustics advanced develop- 
ment lab; Otto J. Howe, ex-Sylvania, named production 
control mgr., commercial products div.; Orval L. Buckner, 
ex-Magnavox, appointed quality control mgr., same div.; 
Richard L. Knight promoted from vp-treas. to senior finance 
vp, General Dynamics Corp.; Edward J. Williams appointed 
mfg. vp . . . R. K. Lockhart, ex-color TV advanced develop- 
ment mgr., named mgr., development engineering, for an 
RCA Navy ultra-high-speed computer project. 

Donald B. Shaw retires as vp-treas., Howard W. Sams 
. . . George L. Wilcox promoted from pres., Canadian West- 
inghouse, to vp & asst, to the pres., Westinghouse Electric 
. . . Dr. Rudolph G. E. Hutter appointed chief engineer, 
Sylvania electronic tube microwave device operations . . . 
J. Burton Henry named to new post of resistor product 
mktg. dir., International Resistance . . . Wilson R. Smith 
promoted from chief engineer to plant mgr., CBS Elec- 
tronics semiconductors. 

C. J. Harrison, Rixon Electronics, Silver Spring, Md., 
named chmn., EIA Small Business Committee . . . Glenn 
M. Bergmann promoted from sales dir., Collins Radio East- 
ern region, to mktg. dir., Cedar Rapids div. . . . Joseph F. 
Houdek Jr. named vp-gen. mgr. of operations, Seeburg 
Corp. . . . Francis A. Boehm named editor Sylvania News, 
replacing Alan D. Pospisil, who will head distributor na- 
tional & local ad campaigns . . .William P. Maginnis, ex- 
ITT, named Maxson Electronics research & development vp. 
■ 

AIEE Edison Medal was awarded to Dr. Harold S. 
Osborne, retired AT&T chief engineer, and Dr. Mervin J. 
Kelly, retired Bell Labs chmn., received the first Mervin J. 
Kelly Award “for outstanding contributions in the tech- 
nology of telecommunication” at the Institute’s winter 
meeting last week in N.Y. Nominated as president for 
1961-62 was Warren H. Chase, Ohio Bell Telephone. 

Hybrid U.S. -Japanese clock radio is now being mar- 
keted by Westclox under its own brand name. Clock is 
made in U.S., radio in Japan. 

Obituary 

George A. Landry, 71, a former Western Electric vp 
and pres, of its subsidiary Sandia Corp., died Jan. 30 of 
a heart attack. He had been asst. dir. of the Office of De- 
fense Mobilization from 1954 to 1958. Surviving are his 
wife, 2 sons, 3 daughters, 2 brothers, a sister, grandchildren. 

James L. Bernard, 63, pres, of Communication Prod- 
ucts Co., died Jan. 31 in Red Bank, N.J. He had been a 
Navy radio operator during World War I, and later studied 
with Marconi. He also worked on FM transmission with 
RCA. Surviving are his wife, a son, 2 sisters, grandchildren. 



Finance 

Zenith’s 4th-Quarter Sag: Zenith had a good i960— but 

failed to close out the year with its customary big finish. 
Sales & earnings in the December quarter slipped from the 
1959 levels. The extent of the profit decline still awaits 
year-end adjustments, and sales were slightly below the 
indicated $84-million volume of Oct.-Dec. 1959. 

“While 1960 was not as good as we thought it was 
going to be,” noted Pres. Joseph S. Wright, “it still was 
an obviously good year and our second best in history.” 
Wright said the sales sag developed mainly in TVs & hi-fi 
phonos. He attributed the profit decline to competitive 
price-cutting & dumping, reduced sales, effects of Zenith’s 
first strike, a 4-day walkout last Aug. (Vol. 16:34). 

“TV has been a highly competitive & confusing market 
in the last half of 1960,” Wright said. “Introduction of 
19-in. & 23-in. screens created heavy pressure to cut prices 
on other sets. Similarly, the less-than-expected sales vol- 
ume left some manufacturers with heavy inventories which 
they dumped at lower prices. While our inventory was held 
tightly in line throughout the year, Zenith tvas naturally 
affected by the pricing situation.” 

Analyzing 1961, Zenith’s president said: “We feel busi- 
ness should be all right in the coming half. We don’t think 
it will set any records, but it should be very satisfactory.” 



Desilu Productions has reduced the mortgage on its 
Hollywood and Culver City studios purchased from RKO 
Teleradio Inc. in 1958, with payment “in excess of $1 mil- 
lion,” including principal & interest. Desilu Pres. Desi 
Arnaz said notes outstanding on the mortgage have been 
reduced to about $2,480,000, and will bring a savings in in- 
terest of $49,000 a year. Desilu bought the 55-acre RKO 
properties for $6,150,000. 

Lynch Corp., parent of Symphonic Electronic Corp., 
plans to acquire Peninsular Metal Products Corp., maker 
of instrumentation & test equipment for aircraft, missiles, 
etc. The Lynch board Feb. 2 approved an exchange offer to 
be made to Peninsular stockholders, subject to SEC ap- 
proval and approval of Lynch stockholders of an increase 
in authorized stock at the June 14 stockholders meeting and 
the acceptance by Peninsular holders of “a fixed percentage 
of the shares of Peninsular.” 

Corning Glass has sold to Sylvania its share of Syl- 
vania-Corning Nuclear Corp., which they established in 
1956 to develop & manufacture fuel elements for nuclear 
power reactors (Vol. 12:46 pl5). In its 1960 financial re- 
port (see financial table) Corning listed a net loss of $2,- 
334,924 on the sales of investments, later explained that 
the bulk of the loss stemmed from its sale of its 50% inter- 
est in Sylvania-Corning. Sylvania will now operate the 
facility as its Sylcor division. 

Transitron Electronic scored record sales of about $23.5 
million in fiscal 1961 ’s first half ended Dec. 31, compared 
with $22 million in the year-earlier period. Pres. David 
Bakalar noted, however, that earnings may just about or 
not quite match the year-ago profit of $3,807,262 (51^ a 
share). He attributed the slowed earnings pace to increased 
R&D spending & start-up costs for Transitron’s new East 
Boston plant. Bakalar said the company’s order backlog 
tops $14 million, 60% of which is in military orders from 
govt, contractors. 

Meredith Publishing Co. has submitted an SEC regis- 
tration statement (File 2-17562) covering 77,064 shares 
for use in its restricted option plan for key employes. 



20 



FEBRUARY 6, 1961 



Financial Reports of TV-Electronics Companies 

These are latest reports as obtained daring; the last week. Dash indicates the information was not available at press time. Parentheses denote loss. 



Company 


Period 


Sales 


Pre-Tax 

Earnings 


Net Earnings 


Per 

Common 

Share 


Common 

Shares 


Corning Glass 


1961 — 52 wks. to Jan. 1 


$214,871, 286 1 


$40,080,741 


$22,054,741' 


$3.23" 


6,754,600 


Story on p. 19 


1960 — 53 wks. to Jan. 3 


204,887,424 


44,635,899 


24,335,899 


3.57* 


6,754,600 


GE 


1960 — vear to Dec. 31" 


4,197,500,000 





200,100,000 


2.26 






1959 — year to Dec. 31 


4,349,508,529 




280,242,123 


3.19 






1960 — qtr. to Dec. 31' 


1,144,277,000 




31,165,000 


.35 






1959— qtr. to Dec. 31 


1,207,211,529 




90,730,123 


1.03 




Hewlett-Packard 


1960 — year to Oct. 31 


60,206,918' 




4,226,645' 


.43 






1959 — year to Oct. 31 


47,745,073 




3,899,941 


.40 




P. R. Mallory 


1960 — vear to Dec. 31 


83,586,283 


8,917,403 


4,367,403 


2.84" 


1,469,743 




1959 — year to Dec. 31 


86,504,443 


8,909,042 


4,339,042 


2.82* 


1,441,009 


Minneapolis-Honey well 


1960 — vear to Dec. 31 2 


426,225,682 


56,313,539 


26,228,539 


3.74 


7,012,128 




1959 — year to Dec. 31 


381,408,597 


62,713,399 


29,399,399 


4.20 


6,997,328 




1960 — qtr. to Dec. 31" 


113,449,185 




7,869,713 


1.12 


7,012,128 




1959 — qtr. to Dec. 31 


107,605,636 




8,618,742 


1.23 


6,997,328 


Narda Microwave 


1960 — 6 mo. to Dec. 31 


1,236,204 




53,121 


.10 






1959 — 6 mo. to Dec. 31 


1,080,596 




26,530 


.04 


— 


Trav-Ler Radio 


1960—6 mo. to Oct. 31 


10,996,000 




230,000 


.27 


865,765 




1959 — 6 mo. to Oct. 31 


12,445,000 




453,000 


.53* 


827,445 


Universal Pictures 


1960 — vear to Oct. 29 


58,429,592 




6,313,357' 


6.92 







1959 — year to Oct. 29 


52,639,256 




1,031,066° 


.95 




Varian Associates 


1960 — 13 wks. to Dec. 31 


12.747,932 




865,008 


.26 


3,374,695 




1959 — 13 wks. to Jan. 2' 1 


10,795,951 




776,710 


.25 


3,142,983 


Warner Brothers Pictures 


1960 — qtr. to Nov. 26 


23,367,000 


3.373,000 


1,773,000 


1.16 


1,527,900 




1959 — qtr. to Nov. 26 


.24,092,000 


3,453,000 


1,753,000 


1.16 


1,505,196 



Notes: ’Record. ^Preliminary. 3 After preferred dividends. •‘Adjusted for Nov.-1960 5% stock dividend. “Excludes $3,367,387 profit ($4.07 a 
share) on sale of studio properties. “Adjusted to include Semicon Associates, acquired June 1960. 7 Excludes non-recurring loss of 
$2,334,924 from sale of investments. 



Ampex anticipates a loss of about $2 million for its 
3rd fiscal quarter ended Jan. 31, compared with earnings 
of $683,000 (28b a share) on $16.3-million sales in the 
year-earlier period. Pres. George I. Long Jr. attributes the 
loss to “substantially lower sales than had been forecast, 
higher costs of placing certain new products into produc- 
tion during this period,” and inventory write-offs. 

Reports & comments available: Ampex, discussion, 
Purcell & Co., 50 Broadway, N.Y. 4 • International Resist- 
ance, study, J. A. Hogle & Co., 40 Wall St., N.Y. 5 • In- 
diana General, analysis, Laird, Bissell & Meeds, 120 Broad- 
way, N.Y. 5 • CBS, review, Fahnestock & Co., 65 Broad- 
way, N.Y. 6 • Thompson Ramo Wooldridge, report, Dean 
Witter & Co., 14 Wall St., N.Y. 5 • Walt Disney Produc- 
tions, memo, Hardy & Co., 30 Broad St., N.Y. 4 • Elec- 
tronic Tube Corp., prospectus, Harrison & Co., 67 Wall 
St., N.Y. 5 • MGM, profile in Feb. 1 Financial World • 
Howard W. Sams, analysis, First California Company, 300 
Montgomery S., San Francisco 4. 



Common Stock Dividends 



Corporation 


Period 


Amt. 


Payable 


Stk. of 
Record 


General Electric Ltd. . . 


— 


3% 


Apr. 17 


Feb. 


27 


GT&E 


Q 


.19 


Mar. 31 


Feb. 


21 


General Tire & Rubber 


Q 


$0.25 


Feb. 28 


Feb. 


13 


Internat’l Resistance . . 


Q 


.07% 


Mar. 1 


Feb. 


15 


Lear Inc 


Q 


.10 


Mar. 1 


Feb. 


10 


P. R. Mallory 


Q 


.35 


Mar. 10 


Feb. 


15 


Maxson Electronics . . . 




.05 


Mar. 1 


Feb. 


14 


Siegler 


Q 


.10 


Mar. 1 


Feb. 


15 


Speer Carbon 


Q 


.17% Mar. 15 


Mar. 


1 


Zenith 


Q 


.40 


Mar. 31 


Feb. 


10 



OVER-THE-COUNTER 
COMMON STOCK QUOTATIONS 

Thursday, February 2, 1961 
Electronics TV-Radio-Appliances Amusements 



The following quotations, obtained in part from the National Asso- 
ciation of Securities Dealers Inc., do not represent actual transactions. 
They are intended as a guide to the approximate range within which 
these securities could have been bought or sold at time of compilation. 



Stock 


Bid Asked 


Stock 


Bid Asked 


Acoustica Associates 


22 


23 Vs 


Maxson Electronics 


10 


11 


Aerovox 


814 


9y» 


Meredith Pub. __ 


41% 


44% 


Allied Radio 


21 


22% 


Metropolitan Bcstg. 


22 


23% 


Astron Corp. 


1% 


2% 


Milgo Electronics 


23 


25% 


Baird Atomic 


24% 


26% 


Narda Microwave .. 


5% 


64g 


Centron Electronic 


5% 


6 


Nuclear of Chicago 


39% 


42%. 


Control Data Corp. 


80% 


84 


Official Films 


2% 


27 a 


Cook Elec. 


12% 


13% 


Pacific Automation 


4% 


5% 


Hraig Systems 


13 Vi 


14% 


Pacific Mercury 


6 


6% 


Dictaphone _ 


34 


36% 


Philips Lamp 


150% 


156% 


Digitronics 


23 


25% 


Pyramid Electric 


3 3 


-7 16 


Eastern Ind. 


1414 


15% 


Radiation Inc. 


26% 


28 7 a 


Eitel-McCullough 


17% 


1914 


Howard W. Sams 


43% 


47 


Elco Corp. 


16 


17% 


Sanders Associates 


39% 


43 


Electro Instruments 


25 


27% 


Silicon Transistor 


5 >4 


6% 


Electro Voice 


9% 


10% 


Soroban Engineering _ 


45% 


49 


Electronic Associates _ 


32% 


35% 


Soundscriber 


14% 


15% 




13% 


14% 


Speer Carbon . 


18% 


19 7 a 




22 VI 


24% 


Sprague Electric 


58% 


62 


Farrington Mfg. 


25% 


27% 


Sterling TV 


7% 


9 


Fo to -Video 


3% 3-11/16 


Taft Bcstg. -- - 


12% 


14% 


General Devices 


9% 


10% 


Taylor Instrument 


42 


45% 


O-L Electronics 


8% 


9% 


Technology Inst. 


6 


7% 


Gross Telecasting 


2114 


23 >4 


Telechrome . _ 


10% 


11% 


Hallicrafters - 


35% 


37% 


Telecomputing 


8 


8% 


Hewlett-Packard 


28% 


3014 


Telemeter 


10% 


11 >4 


High Voltage Eng. 


200 


214 


Time Inc. . 


93 


98 


Infrared Industries 


15% 


17% 


Tracerlab _ _ _ 


9% 


10% 


Interstate Engineering 


1814 


19% 


United Artists 


6% 


7% 


Itek 


50 


54 V. 


United Control _ 


15% 


17% 


Jerrold 


7 


7% 


Universal Trans. . 


% 1 


-3 '16 


I *b for Electronics 


48 


51% 


Vitro — 


13 


14 


f .el Inc _ _ __ _ 


RVa 


5% 


Vocaline _ 


2% 


2 7 a 


Ma^na Theater 


2% 3-1/16 


Wells-Gardner 


23% 


25% 


Magnetics Inc. 


9 


10 


Wometco Ent - 


13 


14% 




WEEKLY 



Television Digest 



FEBRUARY 13, 1961 



© 1961 TRIANGLE PUBLICATIONS, INC. 



■ 



VOL. 17: No. 7 



The authoritative service for executives in all branches of the television arts & industries 



SUMMARY-INDEX OF WEEK'S NEWS 



Stations 

COLLINS RESETS NAB COURSE in his first speech as President 
to Board at Palm Springs sessions. Clair McCollough named 
chmn.; Code operations expanded again (pp. 1, 5 & 11). 

FCC 

MINOW'S HONEYMOON ON THE HILL: Senate hearing produces 
strong agreement between new FCC chairman and Commerce 
Committee members who endorse him unanimously (pp. 2 & 7). 
FORD STRIKES BACK at Landis Report for "derogatory generali- 
zations" about FCC (p. 7). 

Networks 

ADMEN'S REACTIONS TO NEW CBS PLAN for rotating daytime 
minutes, 10 a.m.-noon, are generally favorable, although reps 
hate it passionately (pp. 3 & 9). 

CBS CUTS PRE-EMPTIONS for the 1961-62 season, returning to 
policy of 2-pre-emptions for specials on 60 days notice (p. 10). 
$520,000 IN TV TIME has been given by the networks for the 3 
Presidential press conferences held this far (p. 4). 

Advertising 

TRUST-BUSTER NAMED FTC CHIEF. Paul Rand Dixon moves 
from Kefauver Subcommittee to replace Earl W. Kintner (p. 3). 

Congress 

HARRIS COMMITTEE IS SET in House, with the Democratic-GOP 
ratio changed from 21-12 to 20-13. Broadcasters will see 2 new 
Commerce faces: Republicans Sigal & Thomson (p. 14). 



Consumer Electronics 

DEC. RETAIL UPSURGE brought 1960 TV sales to 5,945,045 sets, 
home radios to 2,378,853. Final EIA 1960 figures (p. 16). 

NO "RECESSION" in consumer electronics, despite softness in 
market, set makers say. Most firms now in fighting trim, expect 
sales at 1960's level (p. 17). 

TV EXPORTS ROSE sharply in October & November, although 
1960 total was lower than 1959 (p. 18). 

EMPLOYMENT IS STABILIZING in home-electronics industry, with 
signs here & there of recalls of furloughed workers and of beef- 
ing up sales & marketing staffs (p. 19). 

HOFFMAN ENDS TV MANUFACTURE, may return when "market 
is stabilized." Will continue radio-phono output. Stromberg- 
Carlson may market TV combinations this year (p. 20). 

Film <t Tape 

DESILU SPLITS WITH NTA. Long-simmering dispute over re-run 
payments causes the break, and SAG charges residuals delin- 
quent on NTA-Desilu series (p. 12). 

20TH-FOX PLANS TV EXPANSION. Studio to build revolutionary, 
new multiple-level TV film stages, says Levathes (p. 12). 

WHAT IA PACT WILL COST TV FILM. Below-the-line costs vary, 
but average hike is $2,500 for half-hour (p. 13). 

Other Departments 

FOREIGN (p. 8). PROGRAMMING (p. 15). PERSONALS (p. 15). 
FINANCE (p. 22). TECHNOLOGY (p. 24). AUXILIARY SERVICES 
(p. 24). EDUCATIONAL TELEVISION (p. 24). 



COLLINS RESETS NAB COURSE: In his first full-dress speech to NAB's Board , new Pres. 

LeRoy Collins last week lamented the networks' pre-eminence as industry spokesmen, decried the influence 
of the rating systems, deplored fissures in broadcasting's public front — and proposed to reorganize NAB's 
structure to make it more effective. 

A standing ovation was given Collins by Board members at conclusion of wide-swinging — & fre- 
guently biting — address winding up 5-day business sessions in Palm Springs, Cal. (see p. 5 & 11). He said 
he would be ready in June to give the Board detailed plans to raise NAB's stature, strengthen its govt, rela- 
tions, co-ordinate the industry's public relations and improve broadcasting itself. Much depends on the last 
point, he added: ''We can wear ourselves out in Washington & talk ourselves hoarse trying to impress the 
public. But if we do not make some substantial progress in the improvement of our product, we will be 
whipped before we start." 

NAB's "voice should be stronger than the voice of any part of it, " Collins told Board. Instead, he 
said, networks speak louder: "When big, important matters develop concerning broadcasting, NAB too often 
is not regarded as the primary contact. Rather, the networks are. I do not quarrel with the networks about 
this. Prestige is something that must be earned & deserved, and it is simply up to NAB to build by its own 
merits its position to this status of acceptance." 

Collins said he's been "shocked" to discover extent of rating systems' grip on broadcasting: "In 
effect, their reporting is determining in large measure not only what the American broadcasting diet will be. 



2 



FEBRUARY 13, 1961 



but also at what time the meals will be served." He pointed out NAB has no "checkrein or oversee status 
over what the raters do, or how they do it." Result: broadcasting allows "an outsider to become master of 
its own house, and does not even check his health card." 

Collins called for "fresh look" at industry's public relations . Complaining that "multitude of voices" 
— NAB, TIO, networks, individual stations — now talk for broadcasting, he said: "We should seek a formal- 
ized method for coordinating NAB & non-NAB public relations activities as they affect the profession as a 
whole." 

Three alternatives were offered Board by Collins : (1) "We can make of NAB a first-class, typical 
trade association." (2) "We can concentrate more on defensive operations in Washington, dodging & ducking 
the efforts of those who seek, with good intentions or bad, to take over our responsibilities and tell us how we 
must run our businesses." (3) "We can become the captain of our own industry, the prime-mover, the prin- 
cipal innovator." 

MINOW'S HONEYMOON ON THE HILL: Newton Minow had no trouble at all with the Senate 

Commerce Committee. He saw eye-to-eye with members on just about everything, and they voted immedi- 
ately & unanimously to recommend confirmation after his hearing last week. He expects to take over as 
FCC Chairman about March 1 for 2 terms — one ending July 1, the other for the full additional 7-year stint. "I 
plan to serve as long as President Kennedy wants me," he said. He paid tribute to Chmn. Ford, whom he'll 
succeed, for smooth transition. 

On virtually every subject, Minow agreed with his questioners or showed satisfactory concern with 
problems mentioned. This is par for the course. New appointees just don't antagonize committees. 

Minow showed occasional glint of something else , however — a substantial mind of his own. Good 
illustration: Sen. Yarborough (D-Tex.) noted that FCC had granted Ch. 10 Albany, N.Y. to WTEN, partially 
because stockholders included congressmen and station was credited by FCC with their presumed knowledge 
of public's needs. Minow said he didn't know the case but that the congressmen angle "shouldn't have a 
thing to do with it." That's one he could have sidestepped easily. 

Minow was also treated to a quick & harsh lesson in Washington jungle warfare — and it was well 
that he was exposed to it early rather than late. After his hearing, he left the witness table to talk to Senators 
— leaving his briefing notes. A UPI reporter picked them up and excerpts were published in Washington 
News Feb. 9, Post Feb. 10. 

As Minow explained later, the notes comprised a series of suggested answers, given him by various 
people, to potential questions. They included methods of hedging, if necessary. There also was a suggestion 
on how to shuffle Commission staff members. It included unflattering comments about a veteran employe. 
Washington News printed his name, Post had the grace to omit it. 

Minow later told UPI that the notes "positively do not represent my own considered opinions." He 
called the affected employe and assured him directly, as did Chmn. Ford. 

Hearin g touched on just about every major subject — and Minow satisfied the Committee with 
responses on all, including: 

Programming: "FCC has a role in elevating programming, and I intend to do something about 
it . . . The FCC must never engage in censorship, but if a licensee is not operating responsibly and in the 
public interest, it's FCC's job to find someone who will ... A poor Western is none of our business, but if they 
put on nothing else for 3 years, FCC should be concerned." He agreed that fiction should be labeled fiction. 

ETV: Hopes that FCC can liberalize rules so that stations "can get some income." Intends to 
retain channel reservations. Commercial stations can do much more in educational field. 

Allocations: "High priority . . . We've got to find a way to use all channels to produce a truly 
nation-wide, competitive system." 

Program ratings: "A proper area of concern for FCC. Ratings differ, so they all can't be right. 
I feel that they underestimate the tastes of the American people." Magnuson said that the Committee's 
files on ratings will be given to FCC after FTC is through with them — which he hoped would be soon. 

CATV & boosters: "A delicate problem. The object is to protect local service while giving a 
variety of services." 



VOL. 17: No. 7 



3 



Space & satellites : A uniform telecommunications policy is "much needed . . . one of the chief 
areas of concern." Will do "whatever I can" to have FCC assume leadership in this field for the government. 

AT&T telephone rates : "Will devote much time" to studying whether they're too high. 

Local vs. network programming : "My approach is to give local stations as much freedom of 
choice as possible." 

There was so much talk of "crime & violence" that the topic may well emerge as the major TV theme 
of this session of Congress, (for details of discussion, see p. 7). 

Strikingly conspicuous by its absence was any discussion of the Landis Report. When the report was 
issued, there was a big to-do about White House putting a large oar into regulatory agency operations. 
But Landis in his recent speeches (Vol. 17:6 p4) has shown that this notion has cooled considerably. And 
President Kennedy virtually deep-froze it last week when he said: "The Congress bears special responsi- 
bility in this area for these agencies, and, therefore, I think it is probably not likely that major responsibility 
in this area would be released to the White House, and I am not completely sure it is wise." He said he 
had talked about it with Rep. Harris (D-Ark.) — and, though he didn't mention it, he has also gone into the 
subject with Sen. Magnuson (D-Wash.). They're chairmen of the Committees most affected — Interstate & 
Foreign Commerce. 

Minow is now lining up assistants but won't confirm anything until Senate finally approves him. 
It's understood that Henry Geller, former FCC attorney now in Justice Dept. Anti-Trust div., will become his 
administrative asst., and that Tedson (Ted) Meyers, ABC N.Y. attorney & campaigner for Stevenson, is 
slotted for a key job — probably Minow's legal asst. There's no evidence that Minow has cleared preferences 
for new general counsel and Broadcast Bureau chief — and it's assumed he'll maintain status quo for chiefs of 
Common Carrier and Safety & Special Radio Services Bureaus. 

CBS-TV's OWN DAYTIME DRAMA: CBS-TV will go ahead with "rotating minutes" plan, due 

to start Feb. 13 in Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-noon periods, despite complaints from station reps & grumbling from sev- 
eral important CBS affiliates. Network's attitude is that it is tired of losing some $5 million annually on unsold 
morning programming, and that CBS must become as competitive as NBC & ABC for daytime dollars. 

This doesn't mean that CBS is wedded forever to the low-priced, rotational plan as presently drafted 
(Vol. 17:3 p7). The network told us last week that it hopes eventually to "upgrade" its morning block with 
new programming paid for by new revenue, and may eventually return to quarter-hour-block selling or at 
least a rate boost. 

Reps are complaining bitterly in the meantime, and say that the entire plan is nothing more than a 
network attempt to siphon off the creamiest national spot revenue (in which affiliates obviously have a stake) 
into network coffers. "An encroachment on the station profit margin," is how James F. O'Grady Jr., exec, 
vp of rep Adam Young, described the CBS plan to us. No such thing, says CBS, which believes "most" affil- 
iates will go along with the plan after it's been in operation for at least 60 days. 

How do buyers feel about the CBS plan? We queried several, found that most like it, some with res- 
ervations. (For details, see p. 9.) 

TRUST-BUSTER NAMED FTC CHIEF: President Kennedy's search for a Democratic re- 

placement for Republican Earl W. Kintner as crusading FTC chairman ended last week with selection of Sen- 
ate investigator Paul Rand Dixon, 47, whose demonstrated zeal as champion of consumer matches Kintner 's. 

American industry may expect intensified FTC drives against price-fixing & monopolistic practices 
under Dixon, who was a trial attorney at FTC (1938-57) before going on the Hill to head up the staff of Sen- 
ate Judiciary Anti-Trust & Monopoly Subcommittee. Dixon & Subcommittee Chmn. Kefauver (D-Tenn.) made 
headlines with slashing probes of price policies in the drug, steel, automobile and milk industries. 

Also tapped for FTC appointments by President Kennedy were 2 other govt, veterans of anti-monopoly 
campaigns. They are political independent Philip Elman, 42, who has worked as asst, in Solicitor General's 
office since 1946, and Democrat Everette MacIntyre, 60, gen. counsel of House Small Business Committee since 
1955 and an FTC staffer for 25 years before that. 

Dixon will take over Kintner's desk as soon as he wins confirmation by Senate for 7-year term. 



4 



FEBRUARY 13, 1961 



Kintner then will go into private law practice in Washington. Elman will replace lame-duck Republican 
Edward K. Mills, whose recess appointment ends Sept. 23, 1963. MacIntyre will fill the first available FTC 
Democratic vacancy. That will probably come when Comr. Robert Secrest's term runs out next Sept. 25. Dixon 
& MacIntyre had figured in the speculation about FTC jobs (Vol. 17:3 pl7). Elman was a dark-horse choice. 

Lone Republican FTC member when change-over dust settles will be Sigurd Anderson. With hold- 
over Democrat William C. Kern carrying on, political lineup of 3 Democrats, one independent and one 
Republican will satisfy the legal requirement that not more than 3 on the 5-man FTC may belong to one party. 

Broadcasters & advertisers may look for no let-up in the Kintner-spurred FTC enforcement programs 
against deceptions & frauds on the air. At same time, there is nothing in reported records of Dixon, Elman or 
MacIntyre to support any industry suspicions that they may turn out to be anti-broadcasting zealots. On the 
Hill and in earlier work at FTC, Dixon & MacIntyre have concentrated on monopoly cases, and Elman's Justice 
Dept, work has covered the same field. 

In goodbye-&-good-luck statement, Kintner said he will leave office with one big hope: That suc- 
cessors Dixon & Co. will operate on the principle that the surest health insurance for free enterprise is more 
industry self-regulation & less govt, control. Kintner also confirmed reports that the Kennedy administration 
asked him to step down as FTC chmn. and continue as a member, but that he turned down the offer. 

"If the advertising industry does not restrain itself, the public will demand increased govt, restraints," 
Kintner told the Detroit meeting of American Assn, of Advertising Agencies Feb. 8. "If the advertising indus- 
try wishes to demonstrate that increased govt, control over its activities is unnecessary, then it must provide 
an immediate demonstration of effective self-regulation." 

COMPLIMENTS OF TELEVISION: $520 ,000 "gift" to the public has been made by the networks 
— in terms of free time accorded so far for the 3 Presidential TV press conferences. 

ABC estimates the value of its time at $90,000, CBS at approximately $205,000, NBC at $225,000 (all 
gross, one-time charges). Prime-time revenue loss will of course be considerably greater if evening press con- 
ferences become numerous. But the Feb. 8 arrangement, under which networks taped the 10-10:35 a.m. con- 
ference for telecast in "convenient" time-slots (CBS ll:30-noon, NBC 1-1:35 p.m., ABC 5-5:30 p.m.), may be the 
answer both for networks & public. 

On a related financial front, although network expenditures for last fall's Great Debates totaled 
$5.5 million ($1.5 million for ABC, $2 million apiece for CBS & NBC), worried network stockholders have 
this consolation: Busy schedules or other considerations kept the 2 candidates from accepting offers of an 
additional $2.45-million worth of TV & radio time ($1 million by NBC, $750,000 by ABC, $700,000 by CBS). 

Last week we learned that White House rules for President Kennedy's news conferences, which 
have been televised live & on tape to try out varying formats (Vol. 17:6 pll), may be changed again. Press 
Secy. Pierre Salinger said the President may return to the Eisenhower administration practice of permitting 
conferences to be filmed & recorded for delayed broadcasts only — or he may decide to allow live cameras 
& microphones at all of them. In any event, Salinger said, procedure for the President's 3rd conference Feb. 
8, when networks used tape, raised an unexpected problem. Print-media reporters were permitted for the 
first time to dispatch stories to their offices while the conference was in progress, but a strict embargo was 
placed on any release of news — by broadcasters or others — until the conference ended. UPI's Washington 
Capital News Service ticker started carrying the news 10 minutes ahead of time, however. UPI said local 
transmission was "inadvertent," but Salinger cited the slip in reporting that Feb. 8 format may be abandoned. 



Stations 

Daytime tower-lighting demonstration will be con- 
ducted for FCC & FAA representatives Feb. 20-21 by 
WMTV (Ch. 33) Madison, Wis. The station has 6 white 
rotating lights which give an effective candlepower of 200,- 
000. The Wis. State Aviation Commission had opposed 
WMTV’s proposed increase from 500 to 1,200 ft., and the 
station leveled off at 1,000 ft. but installed the lights to 
demonstrate how to diminish hazards. Also on hand will 
be Orrin Towner, enginering chief of WHAS-TV Louisville 
& pioneer in daytime lighting. 



Back on the air: WWTV (Ch. 13) Cadillac, Mich, 
resumed with network and filmed programming Feb. 7, 
two weeks after fire destroyed its transmitter & studio 
(Vol. 17:5 pl4). Its 1,282-ft. tower wasn’t damaged, and 
FCC has authorized use of a lower-power RCA transmitter 
than before. It is installed in the building that was to 
have been an addition to the one destroyed by fire. Work- 
men began completion of this structure while firemen were 
still getting the fire under control. New temporary frame 
buildings house the studio-control room and engineering 
office & workroom. The production office is in a trailer. 
Live programming awaits cameras & control equipment. 



VOL. 17: No. 7 



More about 

McCOLLOUGH NAMED NAB CHMN.: NAB’s chief policy- 
maker in the interregnum between Fellows & Collins 
administrations — Clair R. McCollough of Steinman 
stations — last week was elected chairman by the 43- 
member TV & Radio Board. 

Voting unanimously for McCollough to work with new 
Pres. LeRoy Collins as NAB’s presiding officer for a term 
ending in June, 1962, the Board acted in Palm Springs, Cal. 
after hearing Collins lash out at faults he said he’d found 
within the industry (see p. 1). The late Pres. Harold E. 
Fellows, who died in March 1960, had been pres. & chmn. 

In a further move to provide rank-&-file NAB guidance 
for Collins’s Washington hq administration, the Board 
picked a 3-man advisory committee headed by McCollough. 
Other members are Thomas Bostic (Cascade Bcstg. Co.) 
& W. D. (Dub) Rogers (KDUB-TV & KDUB Lubbock, 
Tex.). In effect, they replace NAB’s 3-man Policy Com- 
mittee — also headed by McCollough — which guided NAB 
after the death of Fellows. The Board gave the policy 
committee a rousing vote of thanks for its service. 

Another longtime NAB leader — ex-Pres. Justin Miller, 
who preceded Fellows in office — also was singled out for 
recognition by the Board. It named Miller the winner of 
NAB’s distinguished service award for 1961. Now living 
in Pacific Palisades, Cal., Miller was president from Oct. 
1945 until June 1951, then served as chmn. & gen. counsel 
until April 1954. 

Miller will receive the award — citing him for “a 
significant & lasting contribution to the American system 
of broadcasting” — at the NAB’s May 7-10 Washington con- 
vention. 

NAB board members also: 

Applauded reports that NAB membership (363 TV 
stations & 3 networks, 2,261 radio stations & 4 networks) 
had reached another all-time high. 

Heard CATV Committee Chmn. Eugene S. Thomas 
(KETV Omaha) sound a staff “alert” for “signs of growth” 
of CATV. He said more NAB research on CATV opera- 
tions is needed to determine their “unfavorable impact on 
licensed TV stations.” 

Got Washington lowdowns on Congressional & regula- 
tory-agency developments from NAB govt, affairs vp 
Vincent T. Wasilewski & chief counsel Douglas A. Anello. 

Resolved that the govt, should reappraise require- 
ments for its Conelrad warning system in view of weapons 
development. 

Planned a reception for govt, leaders in Washington 
May 8 in conjunction with the 39th annual NAB convention 
May 7-10 in the Sheraton Park Hotel, revised the conven- 
tion format to include all-day joint TV-radio sessions May 
8, and designated May 7 “FM day.” 

Approved proposals for increased TV Code monitor- 
ing, and further tightened the Radio Code (see p. 11). 

Heard TIO Dir. Louis Hausman report that TV sta- 
tions in 21 cities are now circulating joint bulletins listing 
cultural, educational and public-service programs. 



NAB’s 3rd annual seminar for TV & radio station 
executives will be held July 9-21 at the Harvard Graduate 
School of Business Administration. Participants will be 
charged $575 for the 2-week course, for which applications 
will be accepted by NAB broadcast personnel & economics 
mgr. James Hulbert until March 31. Harvard’s Dr. J. 
Sterling Livingston will be academic dir. of the seminar. 



NEW & UPCOMING STATIONS: CFTM-TV (Ch. 10) Mon- 
treal, Que. began programming as an independent 
French-language outlet Feb. 13-18 with movies & news 
shows. It will hold official opening ceremonies Feb. 19. 
It’s this year’s 2nd independent outlet in the city where 
CBC has operated French- & English-language TV 
stations since the early 1950’s. The other Montreal 
starter this year is English-language CFCF-TV (Ch. 
12), wffiich began Jan. 20 (Vol. 17:4 p. 6). CFTM-TV 
raises the Canadian operating total to 82 outlets. 

CFTM-TV has an 18-kw Marconi transmitter and is 
using a temporary 125-ft. tower, pending the move next 
summer to a special tower which will provide space for all 
Montreal TV & FM stations. At that time its 3-bay Alford 
antenna will be mounted 354-ft. above the ground. Owner 
is Tele-Metropole Corp., with principals being J. A. DeSeve, 
pres.; Andre Ouimet, exec, vp; Paul L’Anglais, vp & com- 
mercial dir. Roland Giguere is station mgr., with Jean- 
Paul Landouceur, dir. of programs, and Maurice Doucet, 
dir. of technical operations. Base hourly rate is $1,000. 
Reps are For joe, Paul L’Anglais (Montreal & Toronto) 
and Stovin-Byles (Winnipeg-Vancouver). 

* * * 

In our continuing survey of upcoming stations, here 
are the latest reports received from principals: 

KVLF-TV (Ch. 12) Alpine, Tex. hasn’t ordered a trans- 
mitter or set a target as yet. Grantee Big Bend Bcstrs. 
Inc., owner of radio KVLF, needs “to do a lot of planning 
. . . because this will be the smallest town in America to 
have a vhf station,” writes Pres. Gene Hendryx. Plans are 
to house TV in the same plant as radio KVLF. No rep yet. 

CHCC-TV (Ch. 10) Coronation, Alta. — call letters 
pending approval — plans March 15 start as satellite of 
parent CHCA-TV (Ch. 6) Red Deer, Alta., according to 
Pres. G. A. Bartley. It has ordered a Canadian GE trans- 
mitter, and tower footings have been installed for a 200-ft. 
Wind Turbine tower. 

CHAT-TV-1 (Ch. 4) Pivot, Alta, is expected to be on 
the air the 3rd week in March as a satellite of parent 
CHAT-TV (Ch. 6) Medicine Hat, Alta., reports Sid Gaff- 
ney, chief engineer. Construction has begun and the sta- 
tion will use a GE transmitter and a 500-ft. Wind Turbine 
tower. The outlet will be included as bonus to CHAT-TV. 

Chicoutimi Ch. 2 & Roberval Ch. 8, satellites licensed in 
Que. to CKRS-TV (Ch. 12) Jonquiere, P. Q., won’t be on 
the air until next July according to Tom Burham, gen. mgr. 
of CKRS-TV. Construction is scheduled to start late in 
January. They will be automatic unattended repeaters of 
CKRS-TV and sold as bonus to that station, which has a 
$300 hourly rate. 

Riviere-du-Loup, P. Q. Ch. 7, licensed to Radio CJFB 
Ltee., doesn’t expect to start programming until September 
1961, writes Luc Simard, pres., who points out that first 
the station must build a road to the transmitter site. It 
hasn’t ordered a transmitter as yet, but will use a 170-ft. 
tower with a 60-ft. 3-bay Alford antenna. 



Sale of WROC-TV (Ch. 5) Rochester to Ch. 10 share- 
timers WHEC-TV & WVET-TV has been agreed upon 
(Vol. 17:5 pl4). WVET-TV will pay Transcontinent TV 
Corp. $6.5 million for WROC-TV, and WHEC-TV will give 
WVET-TV $3,817,500 for its half of Ch. 10— WVET-TV 
winding up full time on Ch. 5, WHEC-TV full time on Ch. 
10. WROC-FM isn’t involved in the sale. 



G 



FEBRUARY 13, 1961 



Canada’s TV-Radio Code: Canadian TV-radio code went 

into effect Feb. 6 upon acceptance by 75% of CAB’s sta- 
tion membership — 35 of 48 privately-owned TV-station 
members and 122 of 168 private radio-station members. 

Among the code’s principal provisions: (1) “Full, fair 
& proper presentation of news, opinion, comment & editor- 
ials is the prime & fundamental responsibility of the 
broadcast publishers.” The term “publishers” is applied to 
station owners & managers as “an integral part of the 
press of Canada.” (2) Honesty & fairness in business & 
advertising are required, and stations are pledged to 
“guard against advertising appeals which might be in poor 
taste or which might encourage activities of a dangerous 
social nature.” (3) Programs “shall be based upon sound 
social concepts and presented with superior craftsmanship 
[and] reflect respect for parents, adult authority, law & 
order, and honorable behavior.” 

Responsibility for enforcement rests with a 5-man 
committee: Gordon Love, CFCN-TV & CFCN Calgary; 
Gerry Gaetz, Selkirk Holdings Ltd., Edmonton; W. T. 
Cruikshank, CKNX-TV & CKNX, Wingham, Ont.; Henri 
Lepage, CHRC Quebec; D. Malcolm Neil, CFNB Frederic- 
ton, N.B. 

Stations can be deprived of use of the code symbol if 
violations are found to have been committed. 

* * * 

Nine applications for Canadian satellites will be con- 
sidered by the Board of Broadcast Governors at its Feb. .22 
meeting in Ottawa. They are: Ch. 5 Salmon Arm, B.C. by 
CHBC-TV Kelowna, B.C.; Ch. 3 Stranraer, Sask. by CFQC- 
TV Saskatoon, Sask.; Ch. 3 Kindersley, Sask., Ch. 2 East- 
end, Sask., and Ch. 2 Val Marie, Sask. by CJFB-TV Swift 
Current, Sask.; Ch. 7 Carlyle Lake, Sask. by CKOS-TV 
Yorkton, Sask.; Ch. 13 Edmundston, N.B. by CJBR-TV 
Rimouski, Que.; Ch. 7 Harrison Brook, Que. by CKCW-TV 
Moncton, N.B., to pick up its other satellite CKAM-TV 
Campbellton, N.B.; Ch. 6 Bon Accord, N.B. by CHSJ-TV, 
Saint John, N.B. Also on the agenda are a change in the 
tower height of CKBL-TV Matane, Que. from 629 ft. to 
2,336 ft. above average terrain, and move of satellite CFCL- 
TV-2 from Elk Lake, Ont. to Kearns, Ont., along with a 
slight drop in power. 



Broadcast engineering conference sessions in conjunc- 
tion with NAB’s annual convention in Washington May 7- 
10 will have these presiding officers & coordinators: May 
8 — a .m. session, A. Prose Walker (NAB), Warren L. 
Braun (WSVA-TV Harrisonburg, Va.); luncheon, Frank 
Marx (ABC); p.m. session, George W. Bartlett (NAB), 
Benjamin E. Windle (radio WCLT Newark, 0.). May 9 
— a.m. TV session, J. D. Bloom (WWL-TV New Orleans), 
Jack Petrik (KETV Omaha); a.m. radio session, Leslie S. 
Learned (MBS), Clure Owen (ABC); luncheon, James D. 
Parker (CBS). May 10 — luncheon, Virgil Duncan (WRAL- 
TV Raleigh-Durham) ; p.m. session, Andrew L. Hammer- 
schmidt (NBC), William S. Duttera (NBC). 

Bcstrs.’ Promotion Assn, will publish this spring a 
compilation of promotion ideas entitled The Best of BP A. 
Bruce Wallace of WTMJ-TV & WTMJ Milwaukee is edit- 
ing the work which will include sections on audience pro- 
motion, sales promotion and merchandising. 

KOTV Tulsa raised more than $75,000 for the March 
of Dimes with an 18-hour telethon that featured such TV 
& Hollywood personalities as Raymond (Perry Mason) 
Burr, Bob Crosby, Red Foley, Kirby (Sky King) Grant. 



$100,000 KPIX San Francisco campaign is being used to 
drum up audience interest & new spot business for the 
station, one of the 5 TV outlets owned by Westinghouse 
Bcstg. Co. The promotion drive is part of a $500,000 
revamp of the station’s local shows in the Mon.-Fri., 4-7 :30 
p.m. and Sat.-afternoon lineup which KPIX has labeled 
“Operation: Entertainment 5.” The station has so far 
scheduled newspaper and TV Guide ads in the San Fran- 
cisco area, outdoor advertising, spot radio, posters on 
municipal buses, bread labels, hamburger wrappers, milk- 
bottle collars, handbills, and truck signs. To introduce the 
revised local schedule, KPIX gen. mgr. Louis Simon invited 
timebuyers from all San Francisco agencies to a luncheon 
at the station’s studios, currently undergoing an expansion 
program. Chief elements in the program shuffle : An after- 
noon dance-party show, an across-the-board slot in early 
evening (6-6:30 p.m.) for cartoon shows like Deputy Dawg, 
increased local news coverage by KPIX teams, more new 
syndicated telefilm shows such as Assignment: Underwater 
and The Blue Angels. 

NAB’s engineering achievement award this year will 
go to Raymond F. Guy, who retired last October as NBC’s 
senior staff engineer after nearly 40 years’ service with the 
network & its parent RCA. Guy, picked by a subcommittee 
of NAB’s bi'oadcast engineering conference committee, will 
receive the 3rd annual award May 10 at the conference in 
Washington. He entered broadcasting in 1921 as an 
engineer-announcer at old radio WJZ N.Y. Subsequently 
he was an active participant in RCA’s research & develop- 
ment in international broadcasting, TV and FM. Guy for 
many years was NBC’s radio & allocations engineering dir. 
and served on scores of industry & govt, committees. Since 
his retirement he has been an engineering consultant in 
Haworth, N.J., and now is on a technical mission in Saigon. 

Stauffer Publications Inc., owner of WIBW-TV & 
WIBW Topeka, Kan., has sold its interest in Home Farm 
Publications Inc. to the firm’s other owner Harman-Slocum 
Publishing Co. Inc. of Cleveland. It acquired the stock when 
it bought all Capper properties, including the Topeka TV 
& radio stations, in 1956. This transaction cuts Stauffer’s 
interest in semi-monthly farm papers from 8 to 2 as it 
continues to publish papers in Kansas & Missouri that are 
not part of Home State Farm Publications. 

KYW-TV & KYW Cleveland have agreed with NABET 
on a new 5-year contract covering 58 technicians at the 2 
stations. The pact, effective to Jan. 31, 1966, replaces the 
3-year agreement which expired last month. Among the 
major changes: Starting weekly wage is increased to 

$104.10 from $99 and will rise to $124.50 in the 5th year. 
The pi'evious weekly high of $162.50 will now increase to 
$188 over the 5-year period. Agreement on the new con- 
tract was announced jointly by Westinghouse Bcstg. area 
vp F. A. Tooke & NABET Local 42 Pres. Dominic Lolli. 

Financing TV & radio stations will be the exclusive 
business of new Communications Capital Corp. (Time-Life 
Bldg., N.Y. 20; Circle 5-2870). Its officers, most of them 
with long experience in various branches of the broadcast 
field: Lazar Emanuel, pres.; George G. Weiss, vp-gen. mgr.; 
Lewis R. Cowan, N.Y. attorney, vp-gen. counsel; Blair 
Walliser, former MBS exec, vp, secy.-treas. The new firm 
announced it will make secured long-term loans and will 
purchase installment notes resulting from the sales of TV 
& radio stations. 

WAFB-TV (Ch. 9) Baton Rouge boosted to 316-kw 
Feb. 4. It had been operating with 275 kw since Aug. 9 
when it shifted to Ch. 9 from Ch. 28. 



VOL. 17: No. 7 



7 



The FCC 

More about 

FCC, SENATE & PROGRAMS: The difficulties besetting 
FCC, Congress or any other governmental agency 
which seeks to influence TV-radio programming were 
well displayed last week during Newton Minow’s hear- 
ing on his nomination to FCC (see p. 2). As the ques- 
tions & discussions developed, members of Senate Com- 
merce Committee began to show how they split. 

Senator Pastore (D-R.I.) started out by asserting that 
“we can’t legislate in programs,” but that FCC needs to 
provide “leadership.” He then told how he had watched a 
succession of horsewhippings, shootings, etc., and that “the 
public deserves something better than this.” He com- 
plained, too, indirectly, about the prevalence of Italian 
gangsters on The Untouchables. 

Sen. Yarborough (D-Tex.) told how foreign visitors 
are amazed at our good news programs — because all they 
see from the U.S. is “shoot-’em-ups.” 

Chmn. Magnuson (D-Wash.), reporting about a discus- 
sion of The Untouchables with Federal Prison Dir. James 
Bennett & Minow, asserted that “fiction should be labeled 
fiction,” and “FCC has that authority.” Minow said he’d 
“try to do something about that.” 

Pastore said that there can be no censorship but that 
FCC “can admonish networks & stations.” If the Com- 
mission had done so earlier, he said, “there wouldn’t have 
been quiz & payola scandals.” 

Sen. Cotton (R-N.H.) asked whether FCC can revoke 
the license of a station that puts on a program that is 
“revolting & offensive to everyone.” Replied Minow: 
“Legally yes, but not as common sense. There are lesser 
methods than revocation.” Cotton pushed further: What 
if the station broadcasts several such programs? Minow 
said that FCC’s power to revoke has been confirmed by the 
courts — “there are precedents.” 

Magnuson stressed industry self-policing, stating that 
there is a good Code which “has made good progress in 
the last couple of years.” 

Then came Sen. McGee (D-Wyo.), who believes very 
much in a tough FCC (congratulating Minow on his “tough 
backbone”). More seriously than humorously, he urged 
that nobody monkey around with “cowboy folklore.” Why, 
he said, tourists are the 2nd largest industry in the West, 
and everyone wears cowboy suits to attract them. But, 
asked Magnuson, “don’t you think the programs should be 
accurate?” McGee retorted: “That would spoil it.” 

Sen. Bartlett (D-Alaska), sounding like a wise old 
sourdough, then proceeded to give the synopsis of a West- 
ern he had watched, building up suspense slowly: Good guy 
& bad guy, both “one of the fastest guns in the West,” 
draw in a saloon. Hero is killed. Heroine walks into sunset 
alone. Pause. “What I want to know, Mr. Minow, is that 
good or bad?” Quickly, he added that he doesn’t want an 
answer now, will ask for it in a year. 

Minow allowed as how that there was “a most unusual 
Western.” 



Ch. 13 Panama City, Fla. was finally awarded to Bay 
Video Inc. FCC anounced that an initial decision favoring 
the grant became effective Feg. 6. 

New TV CPs granted by FCC: Lamar, Colo. Ch. 12 and 
Gallup, N.M. Ch. 3 to Televents Inc. (Denver broker Bill 
Daniels & Associates). 



FORD HITS BACK: Carefully refraining from mention- 

ing the name of James M. Landis, FCC Chmn. Ford 
last week castigated President Kennedy’s regulatory- 
agency advisor for making “derogatory generaliza- 
tions” about the Commission. 

In an obvious reference to caustic criticism of FCC in 
Landis’s report to Kennedy on operations of the agencies 
(Vol. 17:1 pi), Ford said bitterly: 

“There are those who would like to ignore the vigor & 
resolution with which the Commission has attacked the 
almost insurmountable problems which confronted it a year 
ago — and who with derogatory generalizations seek to 
have the accomplishments of the Congress & the Commis- 
sion, working in close cooperation, brushed into oblivion.” 
In a lengthy speech to the Bcstg. & Film Commission 
of the National Council of Churches of Christ in N.Y. Feb. 
8, Ford then ticked off a list of actions completed & 
policies adopted by FCC in 1960 (Vol. 17:1 p8). This one- 
year record alone should prove “the Commission’s courage, 
resoluteness, firmness in its decisions & ability to cope with 
its problems,” he said. 

Ford also pointed out that most critics of FCC never 
look beyond its work in the broadcasting fields, which 
represents “only about one-third” of the Commission’s 
scope. Citing FCC’s responsibilities in wide areas, ranging 
from amateur radio operations to international telecom- 
munications, he said: 

“Accomplishments in these areas have been as import- 
ant to our economy — if not more so — than in TV & radio, 
and they are carried on with little fanfare or public 
recognition.” 

All in all, Ford told the church group, he had no 
apologies to make as he prepared to step down from the 
chairmanship to make way for President Kennedy’s ap- 
pointee Newton N. Minow (see p. 2). 

“I know of no commission or board in Washington 
during the past 25 years that in a period of one short year 
can equal the record of progress made by this small group 
of men in Washington known as the FCC,” he said. “I am 
very proud to have been their chairman for the past year.” 
As for “important & complex” problems of govt, ethics 
outside & inside agencies, Ford deplored the lack of any 
central organization which could provide “leadership and 
issue authoritative opinions.” He suggested a Commission 
on Ethics in Govt, under the White House. 

The Commission’s first job, Ford said, “would be to 
organize a comprehensive program to clarify & define the 
standards of ethics expected of federal officials.” 

Relating that during his long govt, service he had 
“seen the mistakes in judgment of too many competent & 
honest men bring heartache & misery to themselves & their 
families,” Ford asked: “Can we longer afford to bring 
competent men to Washington ignorant of the ethical 
pitfalls that abound here?” 

Supplied with standards spelled out by the top-side 
Commission, federal employes would provide “far fewer 
instances of clouded reputations or public disgrace occa- 
sioned not by bad faith or violation of law, but by a lapse 
of judgment or an insufficient knowledge of the unwritten 
standards of govt, conduct,” Ford argued. 



Shift of WNOK-TV Columbia, S.C. from Ch. 67 to Ch. 
19 has been authorized by FCC. Final allocations rule- 
making deleted Ch. 31 from Lancaster, S.C. and substituted 
Ch. 67, added Ch. 31 to Columbia for educational use and 
made educational Ch. 19 available for commercial use. 



j 



-8 



FEBRUARY 13, 1961 



Anti-Trust Convictions and FCC Licenses: Sentences im- 

posed last week upon companies in the electrical equipment 
anti-trust case may eventually involve properties of GE & 
Westinghouse, the 2 with TV-radio interests. 

There’s thinking at FCC that it’s obligated to weigh 
the convictions to determine whether the 2 firms are so 
“tainted” that they’re unfit to retain licenses. Particularly 
on spot at the moment is Westinghouse, which is seeking to 
buy radio KLAC Los Angeles and has renewals pending 
for WBZ-TV & WBZ Boston, latter on payola questions. 

Commission may or may not start proceedings on its 
own, calling for hearings, but even if it doesn’t, attorneys 
who practice before the FCC say there’s strong possibility 
that private interests, with eager eye on prime facilities 
will attempt to wrest them away. 

GE & Westinghouse would have defenses, of course. 
Arguments would include: (1) Violations weren’t in broad- 
cast field. (2) Very top management wasn’t responsible. 
(3) Good broadcast records. 



Reluctant Hollywood witnesses in FCC’s TV film hear- 
ings have been “commanded” by chief hearing examiner 
James D. Cunningham to turn up at reconvened public 
sessions next month. Setting March 8 for the start of re- 
sumed hearings in the federal court house in Los Angeles, 
Cunningham called on Dick Fishell, Betty Langley, Dick 
Fishell & Associates, Mary Rothschild, MCA’s Taft B. 
Schreiber and Promotions Unlimited to be on hand. Citing 
the Commission’s order supporting him in his hassles with 
the witnesses (Vol. 17:5 p4), Cunningham instructed them 
“to produce all of the information & data required.” The 
parties have stated they intend to appeal FCC’s order. 
In Hollywood, an MCA spokesman, asked if Schreiber 
would appear & testify, replied, “We prefer not to discuss 
it at this time.” Oliver B. Schwab, attorney for Fishell, 
Rothschild, and Langley, said: “We’re not going to dis- 
regard a govt, order. We will appear at the hearing. 
We’re analyzing the FCC order. We haven’t determined 
our course as yet.” 

Cornhusker TV Corp. (John E. Fetzer) will operate 
KGIN-TV (Ch. 11) Grand Island, Neb. as a satellite of 
its KOLN-TV Lincoln. Electron Corp. transferred its CP 
for KGIN-TV to Fetzer in an FCC-approved agreement 
providing for payment of $2,500 out-of-pocket expenses. 
The Commission extended the station’s completion date to 
June 13. Comr. Bartley dissented from the CP assignment. 

Allocations rule-making has been started by FCC on 
conflicting proposals by (1) KHOL-TV (Ch. 13) Kearney- 
Holdrege, Neb. to add Ch. 4 to Superior and Ch. 8 to 
Albion, and (2) Neb. Council for Educational TV to add 
Ch. 4, 3 and 8 respectively to Kearney, Basset and Albion 
for educational use and reserve commercial Ch. 13, Alliance, 
and Ch. 9, North Platte, for educational purposes. The 
Commission asked for comments by March 13. 

Simultaneous vhf-uhf operation of Triangle’s KFRE- 
TV Fresno until April 15 has been authorized by FCC to 
insure “orderly transition” in the all-uhf deintermixture 
which shifted the station from Ch. 12 to Ch. 30 (Vol. 16:28 
p6 et seq.). The Commission said the dual operation, 
scheduled to start Feb. 16, will not only provide continuity 
of service to the area, but will permit determination of 
precise locations of uhf boosters or translators to provide 
satisfactory service. 

WTOC-TV (Ch. 11) Savannah received program test 
authorization, will boost power soon from 209 to 316 kw. 



New international allocations agreement, signed in 
Geneva in 1959 but not yet ratified by the U.S., is the basis 
of a rule-making proceeding started by FCC last week. The 
Commission proposed a number of changes in between 108 
& 40,000 me, none affecting basic TV & radio allocations. 
The proposal is Docket No. 13928. Copies are available from 
the Commission. Comments due Feb. 28, replies March 10. 

Lower uhf channels for Harrisburg, Pa. were author- 
ized by FCC as it finalized rule-making. WHP-TV was 
granted a shift from Ch. 55 to Ch. 21; off-air WDTV from 
Ch. 71 to Ch. 33. WTPA remains on Ch. 27. The Com- 
mission also ordered CP-holder WTLF Baltimore to change 
from Ch. 18 to Ch. 24 and CP-holder WRAK-TV Williams- 
port to change from Ch. 36 to Ch. 26. 

Uhf WKAK-TV (Ch. 36) Williamsport, Pa. has been 
granted more time to build, FCC acting favorably on a 
petition for reconsideration filed by grantee WGAL-TV 
Lancaster. A similar petition by WLAN-TV (Ch. 21) Lan- 
caster was denied because of “untimely filing.” 

Foreign 

Getting ready for world TV, Japan’s Postal Service 
Ministry hopes to join in any space-satellite TV program 
which gets started between now and 1964, the year of the 
Tokyo Olympics. In April, the Ministry will form the Space 
Communication Cooperation Council to unify the research 
of 10 organizations. It already has started construction of 
a 100-ft. parabolic space-communication antenna, largest 
in Asia, in Togane. 

NBC Pres. Robert E. Kintner leaves for Latin America 
this week (Feb. 17) to “explore the potential for expansion 
of NBC news coverage & international business opera- 
tions.” He will meet with William H. Phelps, Radio 
Caracas owner, Curt Lowe and Dr. Ildefonso Recalde, own- 
ers of Argentina’s Cadete. Visits to the new TV stations 
in Mar del Plata, Argentina and Brasilia are also planned 
before Kintner’s return to N.Y. March 5. 

Model prison with TV rooms, cinema, swimming pool 
and other niceties for the best of the captive audience will 
be built at Muret, France. Unmellowed “toughs” who re- 
fuse to watch their ps & qs won’t get to watch TV either. 
Minimum entrance requirement: A 10-year sentence. 



FACTBOOK NO. 32 CLOSES MARCH 3 

The 1961 Spring-Summer edition of Television 
Factbook (No. 32), our new and greatly expanded issue 
containing data never before published in one volume, 
closes for advertising on Friday, March 3. 

The new Factbook, for the first time, provides sta- 
tion area coverage and circulation at a glance — contour 
maps of all commercial stations as filed with the FCC, 
county by county and net weekly circulation of all com- 
mercial stations as reported by the American Research 
Bureau 1960 Television Coverage Study, plus all the 
regular features which, since 1947, have made 
Television Factbook the industry’s most frequently 
used reference. 

To reserve your advertising space for this new 
1,088-page edition, we suggest you get in touch with our 
Business Department today. Call, write or wire for 
rate card and descriptive brochure. 




VOL. 17: No. 7 



9 



Networks 

If! ore about 

CBS DAYTIME PLAN: “Daytime TV,” a network sales 

executive told us last week in a candid moment, “has be- 
come, at the network level, primarily a matter of cost 
efficiency. The moment your ratings put you in the 
top position, you’ll get a rush of business — if your 
prices are reasonable. If you’re on the losing end of 
the ratings race, you’re in trouble because you’ll almost 
certainly be the guy who’s losing the business.” 

This, in essence, is what’s been happening to CBS-TV’s 
10 a.m.-noon line-up lately. NBC-TV has pulled ahead in 
competitive ratings & has jumped higher than 30% in 
business. CBS’s answer has been — for CBS — a fairly drastic 
action: The new “rotating minutes” plan which has aroused 
considerable industry controversy (see p. 3). As CBS sees 
it, the network had little choice but to take the step. “We 
were taking a beating,” a CBS official told us privately last 
week. “We had to make ourselves competitive in the day- 
time market place.” 

Some segments of the industry are taking a wait-&-see 
attitude toward the CBS plan, because some things about it 
are not clear. It’s not at all certain just how many stations 
will accept the plan in the first place. Several large station 
groups, notably Corinthian Bcstg. Co.’s outlets, all CBS 
affiliates, are playing it very cozy and still haven’t notified 
the network whether they’ll go along with the rotating 
participations. 

Even those stations who intend to clear for the new 
CBS plan don’t know exactly how much they’ll be paid in 
station compensation. The way the plan now works out, 
CBS will receive a standard amount for each spot announce- 
ment and the “station compensation” portion will be 
divided up among the stations carrying the schedule. 
Actually, the longer the lineup, the less each individual 
station gets. 

Network Busily Selling Plan 

CBS salesmen are meanwhile involved in a crash 
program of agency & client calls. Although they may not 
be able to talk firmly of station lineups, the price for the 
new package is so low ($3,200 per 60-sec. announcement in 
the winter-spring season, dropping to a winter low of $2,500 
with discounts) that business is already coming in. Signed 
(or expected to sign shortly) are Lever Bros., S. C. Johnson, 
Bon-Ami, and Mentholatum. Of 100 weekly commercial 
minutes in the 10 a.m.-noon block, CBS has so far sold a 
little over 40, hopes to sell more before the plan debuts 
Feb. 13. 

The final decision on the CBS plan, actually, rests not 
with reps (who hate it) or the affiliates (who aren’t sure 
about it) or the network (which feels it is the only course 
left) ; it rests with agency buyers, media planners, market- 
ing strategists and others who reflect the client viewpoint. 
To sample such opinion, we contacted a number of leading 
N.Y. admen (several of whom asked for anonymity for 
various competitive reasons, or because of their relation- 
ships with the network or with clients). The comments 
below are typical: 

Maxwell Ule, senior vp, Kenyon & Eckbardt: “The 
new CBS plan could be an interesting step in terms of 
increasing coverage of market, reducing variance of cover- 
age within the market, and obtaining a more balanced 
frequency in the market. There will be little, if any, loss 
in the effectiveness of commercials on a rotating basis, as 



the CBS morning shows have a fairly steady audience.” 

Media director of a medium-sized N.Y. agency handling 
several TV accounts, including an auto firm: “I’m all in 
favor of the plan, strictly as a media buy. We may even 
move some of our national spot money into it. However, 
the CBS plan is also causing me some headaches. We have 
one advertiser who buys a fairly heavy schedule of daytime 
i.d. spots on CBS stations. We’ve already been advised by 
the CBS o&o outlets that the i.d. schedule will have to 
be yanked because of the loss of middle station breaks and 
the shift of closing station breaks to 60 seconds plus an i.d., 
which creates new product-protection problems.” 

Ann T. Janowicz, media supervisor, Ogilvy, Benson & 
Mather: “CBS very definitely had to do something to meet 
the competition. They had 2 choices — either improve day- 
time program ratings or reduce the price to compete. So, 
they are not dealing from strength. Back in November, 
we did an extensive network daytime analysis for one of 
our clients, and found that both ABC and NBC represented 
a more efficient, flexible buy than CBS. The new CBS plan 
has altered that. We have now made a revision in our 
recommendation, and the CBS plan could affect this client. 
In general, it is my interest to get the best possible buy for 
clients, and I’m not concerned if the CBS plan is ‘raiding 
the spot field’ as reps claim.” 

Media director of one of the “big 3” soap-detergent- 
food firms: “I don’t think the new CBS plan is a substitute 
for spot TV. It is a wise competitive move to stay in busi- 
ness. The stations would do well to listen to CBS. The plan 
could be of mutual benefit, and total revenue — network & 
spot — could be greater to stations than it is now. From the 
advertiser standpoint, I don’t see a great loss in shifting 
from 15-min. segments to rotating 60-sec. announcements. 
Any program identification loss to the advertiser is not 
worth considering, compared with the price reduction being 
offered.” 

Jeff Fine, chief timebuyer, Wexton: “It’s a realistic 
plan, an important aid to the small advertiser. Of course, 
at the moment we have no guarantee of how many stations 
will clear for it. Within our own shop, we have Golden 
Press (Golden Books) which has been advertising ©n a 
limited spot basis. Golden Press can now get full network 
identification for the same price, so the CBS plan will 
undoubtedly be considered.” 

Leslie L. Dunier, TV-radio vp, Mogul, Williams & 
Saylor: “I think the plan was inevitable. CBS is only 
competing with other networks. Although stations have 
reacted unkindly toward the plan, it will enable advertisers 
to spread out & reach an unduplicated audience. It will also 
enable small-budget advertisers, who have been restricted 
in the past, to enter the daytime TV field. We’ve had little 
participation business on CBS-TV in the past, but the. new 
plan might make a real difference.” 

* * * 

Praise for magazine-format TV came recently from 
Foote, Cone & Belding Chmn. Fairfax Cone. By spreading 
advertiser messages around on a rotating basis between 
low- & high-rated shows, he said, networks could “experi- 
ment more & do more programming for minority tastes,” 
since all advertisers would share the cost. “As it is now,- 
the advertiser has to take all the risks,” Cone added. 
“That’s why we see so much copying of a successful 
format.” Magazine-format TV also makes for firmer 
pricing of network program availabilities, in Cone’s opinion, 
unlike the present situation in which hard-to-sell shows 
(informational, public-affairs and special events programs) 
have to be sold frequently at cut rates. 



10 



FEBRUARY 13, 1961 



CBS Cuts Back Pre-emptions: Because CBS-TV’s night- 

time schedule “suffered substantially by reason of numerous 
interruptions” during the 1960-61 season, CBS’s William H. 
Hylan, sales administrative vp, informed the network’s 
“Class A” clients last week that the network was abandon- 
ing its experiment of planning “as many as 4” pre-emptions 
per program for nighttime specials & public-affairs shows, 
2 of which were to be on a mandatory basis. 

During the 1961-62 season, the relationship between 
CBS & “Class A” advertisers will be for 52 shows in 52 
weeks “with the right to exercise 2 contractural omissions 
on 60 days notice.” Public-affairs programs will be con- 
fined as much as possible to “a fixed, weekly nighttime hour 
for the remainder of the season.” 

Next fall, there’ll be no heavy bumping of regular 
nighttime fare (with consequent disruption of regular 
rating patterns). Hylan said that special shows scheduled 
via pre-emptions will be “on a very limited basis” and “of a 
highly selective character.” 

CBS’s problems in the 1960-61 season in this area 
apparently were, in part, due to a fairly heavy schedule of 
entertainment specials (although not as big as NBC’s) 
which broke into the pattern of regular bread-&-butter fare. 
Adding to the problem was the unexpectedly heavy schedule 
of political shows (debates, pre-election shows, the election 
itself, etc.) which sometimes ousted such CBS audience 
blockbusters as Gunsmoke and Have Gun, Will Travel. In 
effect, CBS is thus returning to a programming theory 
whereby a special must be something pretty “special” 
indeed before it can lay claim to a valuable nighttime slot 
occupied by a well-rated show. 



Growing network program control, with its parallel 
trend toward magazine-type participations in 60-min. night- 
time shows, is typified by the ABC-MGM deal for The 
Asphalt Jungle, which replaces The Islanders on April 2 
in the 9:30-10:30 p.m. slot. The show is a direct purchase 
by the network from MGM-TV, with ABC-TV in for a 
share of ultimate residuals and a slice of overseas revenue. 
In turn, the network has sold the show to a client list which, 
within the frame of the hour-long show, reads like a roster 
of full-program-sponsorship clients on a major network a 
few years ago. There will be no less than 11 sponsors when 
the show begins its run. The usual buy is a l/6th-sponsor- 
ship, alternate-week arrangement. The lineup, with 
agencies: Gillette Co. (Maxon), Liggett & Myers (McCann- 
Erickson), Beecham Products (Kenyon & Eckhardt), 
Cluett, Peabody (Lennen & Newell), Union Carbide (Wil- 
liam Esty), American Chicle (D-F-S), Carter Products 
(Ted Bates), Pepsi-Cola (BBDO), Simoniz (D-F-S), Polk 
Miller Broducts (Ayer), Speidel (McCann-Marschalk). 

CBS-IBEW negotiations for a new contract replacing 
one that ran out Jan. 31 (Vol. 17:6 pll) continued last week 
in Washington, but were reported nowhere near an end. 
Union spokesmen were attempting to wrap up a job- 
security package before getting down to wage demands — 
as yet unspecified. Job-security issues centered on dis- 
placement of IBEW technicians by automation and on the 
network’s shutdown of its N.Y. production sales unit (Vol. 
17:4 pll). Also in issue: Definitions of IBEW’s jurisdiction. 
“We’ve been unable to pin down anything yet,” a union 
source told us. 

Leonard H. Goldenson, AB-PT pres., will discuss inter- 
national broadcasting’s relation to world trade and the U.S. 
economy before the San Francisco Ad Club March 1. A 
reception at the World Trade Club will follow, , v 



NETWORK SALES ACTIVITY 



ABC-TV 

The Roaring Twenties, Sat. 7:30-8:30 p.m.; The Untouch- 
ables, Thu. 9:30-10:30 p.m., part. eff. March 
& April respectively. 

Corn Products (Lennen & Newell) 

NBC-TV 

50 major league baseball games, Sat. & Sun. aft., half- 
sponsorship on regional basis. 
Anheuser-Busch (Gardner) 

Laramie, Tue. 7:30-8:30 p.m., part. eff. April 18. 

Quaker Oats (J. Walter Thompson) 

Chet Huntley Reporting, Sun. 5:30-6 p.m., part. eff. Feb. 26. 
Mutual of Omaha (Bozell & Jacobs) 

Daytime programming, part. eff. March 31 & April 1 resp. 

Whitehall Pharmaceutical (Ted Bates) 
Cracker Jack (Leo Burnett) 



Biggest TV plum of the season, the estimated $20- 
million spent annually in nighttime business on CBS-TV by 
General Foods Corp., is staying right where it is — at CBS. 
This was the upshot last week of an intense rivalry between 
the 3 networks. NBC and ABC, armed with evidence of 
their rating strength against CBS and tentative 1961-62 
season schedules, made extensive pitches, by invitation, to 
General Foods’ top brass & marketing strategists. For 
a few days (so rumor ran), NBC had the inside track. 
Then CBS moved in, armed with its own research facts & 
planned lineup. GF mulled the pitches over, gave the nod to 
CBS, we learned last week. The GF lineup includes full 
sponsorship of the Danny Thomas and Andy Griffith Shows, 
co-sponsorship of Hennesey, Angel, Ann Sothem, and 
Twilight Zone, and a one-third sponsorship of Rawhide. 
There is, however, no GF daytime business now on CBS-TV. 

NBC Board of Delegates (executives of the key affili- 
ates) held its annual meeting last week in Phoenix. NBC- 
TV program vp David Levy briefed affiliates on that portion 
of the network’s fall schedule which is reasonably firm at 
this point. A few highlights: A Walt Disney-produced 
60-min. show in color, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Sunday. 
Earlier that day, The Nation’s Future will occupy an 
afternoon slot, moving over from Saturday. Four Star 
Productions’ big entry on NBC this fall will be a 60-min. 
anthology hosted by Dick Powell. David Brinkley, of the 
Huntley-Brinkley team, will have a weekly 30-min. fea- 
ture news show of his own. 

40 NBC-TV employes have been discharged in Holly- 
wood because of decreased production, and more are slated 
to go, we’re told by network sources. Those given notices 
to date were 14 technical operators, 22 stage hands, 2 asst, 
directors, 2 stage managers. We’re told the cutbacks are 
caused by completion of production of the Shirley Temple 
Show for this season, and the fact that there are fewer 
specials. An additional factor: NBC-TV will not be carry- 
ing the Oscar awards show this spring, for the first time 
in years. It’ll be on ABC-TV (Vol. 16:36 p6). 

CBS-TV affiliate executives will hold their annual con- 
ference May 4 & 5 at N.Y.’s Waldorf-Astoria. Agenda 
includes discussion of sales and programming plans for the 
1961-62 season, the network’s competitive position, develop- 
ments in the new daytime sales plan. 




VOL. 17: No. 7 



11 



Advertising 

more about 

Code Monitoring Step-up: NAB’s TV Code Review Board 

plans to monitor TV stations for about 150,000 hours this 
year compared with about 90,000 in 1960, Chmn. E. K. 
Hartenbower (KCMO-TV Kansas City) reported last week. 

Appointed for another term in his job as Review 
Board chief, Hartenbower also told NAB’s TV Board at a 
Feb. 9 session in Palm Springs, Cal. (see p. 5) that the 
industry’s self-regulating activities are being stepped up 
in all 3 Code offices — Washington (central administration), 
Hollywood (films), N.Y. (commercials). 

The TV Board reappointed Mrs. A. Scott Bullitt (KING- 
TV Seattle) & Joseph Herold (KBTV Denver) to 2-year 
terms as Review Board members. It also named a new 
member — Lawrence H. Rogers II (Taft Bcstg. Co.). Rogers 
replaces Gaines Kelley (WFMY-TV Greensboro, N.C.), who 
turned down reappointment because of his health. 

Meeting a day earlier in Palm Springs, NAB’s Radio 
Board accepted a recommendation by the Radio Code 
Review Board that Code rules specify the maximum amount 
of advertising time acceptable for announcement and mul- 
tiple-sponsorship programs (Vol. 17:3 pl6). 

Effective May 1, the Radio Code amendment will read: 

“The maximum time to be used for advertising in 
anouncement and/or multiple sponsorship programs shall 
not exceed an average of 14 min. an hour, computed on a 
weekly basis; provided, however, that in no event shall the 
maximum exceed 18 min. in any single hour or 5 min. in 
any 15-min. segment. For the purpose of determining 
advertising limitations, such programs as ‘classified,’ ‘swap 
shop,’ ‘shopping guide,’ and farm auction programs shall be 
considered as containing 1 Yz min. of advertising for each 
5-min. segment.’’ 

Cliff Gill (KEZY Anaheim, Cal.) was reappointed Radio 
Code Review Board chmn., along with other members — 
Richard O. Dunning (KHQ Spokane), Elmo Ellis (WSB 
Atlanta), Herbert L. Krueger (WTAG Worcester), Robert 
L. Pratt (KGGF Coffeyville Kan.). 



Good time-buyer needs curiosity, conviction & courage, 
William S. Vernon, Blair TV account exec, told the Feb. 7 
RTES timebuying and selling seminar. He must have 
curiosity to explore all available tools and determine the 
most efficient way to handle specific media situations; con- 
viction to suggest new, unorthodox, off-beat approaches; 
and courage to stick his neck out. Speaking to sellers of 
time, Sam B. Vitt, Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield vp 
& media dir., also suggested 3 basics: (1) Understand the 
rudiments of the ad business and, “above all, understand 
the time buyer.” (2) Be helpful — “a salesman’s success in- 
creases in direct proportion to